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army. Well is it for us that the confidence is not misplaced, for no battle of more rital importance has been fought during the rebellion than that which is impending or already decided. Brilliant affair in Texas--two Yankee gunboats repulsed and destroyed — Failure of the expedition. The great Texas expedition, so often hinted at in the Yankee papers, has been repulsed, with the loss of two gunboats composing it. The 19th Army corps, under Ben Franklin, left New Orleans on the 4th inst., in transports, accompanied by four gunboats, to capture Sabine City, a point of great strategic value on the line dividing Louisiana from Texas. They arrived off the city on the 8th. A correspondent of the N. Y. Tribune says: In the course of Monday night the entire fleet gathered in the vicinity of the Sabine. The gunboats and vessels of lightest draught crossed the bar, and preparations were made for the attack. Capt. Crocker, of the Clifton, was to feel the enemy, uncover the
. Brilliant affair in Texas--two Yankee gunboats repulsed and destroyed — Failure of the expedition. The great Texas expedition, so often hinted at in the Yankee papers, has been repulsed, with the loss of two gunboats composing it. The 19th Army corps, under Ben Franklin, left New Orleans on the 4th inst., in transports, accompanied by four gunboats, to capture Sabine City, a point of great strategic value on the line dividing Louisiana from Texas. They arrived off the city on the 8th. A correspondent of the N. Y. Tribune says: In the course of Monday night the entire fleet gathered in the vicinity of the Sabine. The gunboats and vessels of lightest draught crossed the bar, and preparations were made for the attack. Capt. Crocker, of the Clifton, was to feel the enemy, uncover the batteries, and ascertain his strength and position. Gens. Franklin and Weitzel examined the shore of the Pass to find the most eligible point for landing the forces. The Clifton steame
Another letter thus sums up the disaster: Just as soon, however, as an attempt was made to land, the rebels poured in shot thick and fast, which they sent through and through our gunboats, and very soon sunk one--the Sachem — and blew up another. All our sharpshooters on one of the boats were captured, and it was only by prompt and rapid movements that the Commanding General, Franklin, managed to get away. From Charleston. The New York papers have news from Charleston to the 16th inst.: Gen. Gillmore was mounting heavy guns on the upper part of Morris Island for the purpose of bombarding Charleston, and, although Fort Sumter was still held by the rebels, the siege was progressing favorably. The fire from the rebel works on James Island had proved somewhat annoying to the working parties, but casualties were few. Gen. Gillmore had issued a congratulatory order to his troops, and a copy is to be placed in the hands of every living officer and soldier who has particip
iven back. Buford, with his cavalry, made a reconnaissance, crossing at Germania Ford and driving in the rebel pickets. The rebels are fortifying Slaughter Mountain, and it is thought a battle will take place near Orange Court- House. Miscellaneous. The Baltimore American's special Fort Monroe correspondent says there is a rumor there, which obtains belief with many, that Richmond is being evacuated. Beast Butler is canvassing Pennsylvania in favor of Curtin for Governor. He made his first speech at Harrisburg. There was a heavy frost, the first of the season, in Eastern Tennessee on Friday night, the 18th inst. The news from Rosecrans sent gold up to 134½ in New York on Saturday. Gen. Sickles is on his way to join his command. Gen. Cass is reported to be dying. The Abolition majority in Maine is over 16,000. A "rebel paymaster" with $2,000,000, on his way to pay the troops at Little Rock; Ark, has been captured by Gen. Blunt's forces.
ed 15-feet wall instead, they were unable to do so, having no scaling ladders. The rebels at the same time opened a concentric fire of shell, grape, and canister from a ram and the adjacent forts, so that the difficulty was increased. The garrison seem to have felt secure, as a sentry, being hailed, demanding a surrender, replied: "Hallo, Yank, are you there? Nary a surrender; you can't climb up here." Operations of the army of the Potomac. A dispatch from Washington, dated the 20th inst., says: From various sources we have the following reports of doings in front: The rebels tried to effect crossings at different points on the Rapidan on Wednesday, but only succeeded at Robinson Ford, and there they were speedily driven back. Buford, with his cavalry, made a reconnaissance, crossing at Germania Ford and driving in the rebel pickets. The rebels are fortifying Slaughter Mountain, and it is thought a battle will take place near Orange Court- House. Miscellaneou
Latest from the North. We are indebted to the courtesy of the officers of the Exchange Bureau for New York papers of Monday, the 21st inst. The Yankees have received the first instalment of the Tennessee news. The dispatch we publish below is all that is published; but the editorial from the Tribune shows that more and worse news, which has not been printed, is in Washington. The Times and Herald, of the 21st, acknowledge a defeat. From Rosecrans — the great battle commenced. Under the heading, "Highly important from Gen. Rosecrans's army, desperate engagement near Chattanooga, the enemy attack Thomas's corps, they are temporarily repulsed, a second assault by reinforcements, the enemy again repulsed, another engagement expected, Gens. Hill, Johnston, Longstreet, and Polk engaged," the Tribune has the following dispatch: Headq's army of Cumberland,Crawfish Spring, Ga., Sept. 19, 1863. A desperate engagement commenced this morning at 11 o'clock. The rebels m
September 19th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 1
f the 21st, acknowledge a defeat. From Rosecrans — the great battle commenced. Under the heading, "Highly important from Gen. Rosecrans's army, desperate engagement near Chattanooga, the enemy attack Thomas's corps, they are temporarily repulsed, a second assault by reinforcements, the enemy again repulsed, another engagement expected, Gens. Hill, Johnston, Longstreet, and Polk engaged," the Tribune has the following dispatch: Headq's army of Cumberland,Crawfish Spring, Ga., Sept. 19, 1863. A desperate engagement commenced this morning at 11 o'clock. The rebels made a heavy attack on the corps of Gen. Thomas, forming the left wing of our army, and at the same time they attacked the right wing, which was thought to be a feint. Gen. McCook's and Gen. Crittenden's troops were thrown into the engagement as convenience offered, the main portions of their forces being on the march at the time. The fight on the left was of a very desperate character. The enemy
December, 9 AD (search for this): article 1
ravely until a shot passed through her boiler, and she was compelled to raise the white flag. The Clifton had, besides her crew, 70 sharpshooters on board. The Sachem had a detachment of 30 sharpshooters. Five soldiers, one sailor, and one signal man, escaped down the beach from the Clifton. The number of killed and wounded is not known. The Arizona, being unequal to the contest, fell back, and the order was issued to the fleet to withdraw. The expedition returned to New Orleans, Sept. 12, with its designs prostrated at the feet of adverse circumstances. Another letter thus sums up the disaster: Just as soon, however, as an attempt was made to land, the rebels poured in shot thick and fast, which they sent through and through our gunboats, and very soon sunk one--the Sachem — and blew up another. All our sharpshooters on one of the boats were captured, and it was only by prompt and rapid movements that the Commanding General, Franklin, managed to get away. Fr
iven back. Buford, with his cavalry, made a reconnaissance, crossing at Germania Ford and driving in the rebel pickets. The rebels are fortifying Slaughter Mountain, and it is thought a battle will take place near Orange Court- House. Miscellaneous. The Baltimore American's special Fort Monroe correspondent says there is a rumor there, which obtains belief with many, that Richmond is being evacuated. Beast Butler is canvassing Pennsylvania in favor of Curtin for Governor. He made his first speech at Harrisburg. There was a heavy frost, the first of the season, in Eastern Tennessee on Friday night, the 18th inst. The news from Rosecrans sent gold up to 134½ in New York on Saturday. Gen. Sickles is on his way to join his command. Gen. Cass is reported to be dying. The Abolition majority in Maine is over 16,000. A "rebel paymaster" with $2,000,000, on his way to pay the troops at Little Rock; Ark, has been captured by Gen. Blunt's forces.
jured. Col. Heg and Col. Bradley, commanding brigades, were wounded. Col. Jones, of the 36th Ohio regiment, and Col. Carroll and Maj. Vannetta, of the 10th Indiana regiment, were also wounded. Lieut. Jones, of company A, 10th Indiana regiment, was killed. Lieut. Col. Hunt, of the 40th Kentucky regiment, and Lieut. Col. Maxwell, of the 2d Ohio regiment, were wounded. Lieut. Degraw, Lieut. Ludlow, and Lieut. Fessenden, of battery H, 5th Artillery, were wounded. Lieut. Boyd, of battery I, 4th artillery, and Capt. Brown, of the 31st Illinois regiment, were wounded. Capt. Searies, Assistant-Adjutant-General of Stark weather's brigade, was killed. Battery H, of the 5th artillery, was lost and afterwards recaptured by the 79th Indiana regiment. The battle is not yet over. It will probable be renewed to-morrow. Rebel prisoners represent that the corps of Gens. Hill, Polk, Johnston, and Long street were in the engagement. Our men are in t
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