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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 14, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Belgium (Belgium) (search for this): article 6
trumpet, a dinner service in handsome porcelain, a printing press, a table, and everything necessary for photography. It was mounted by Madame La Princesse de la Tour d'auvergne, Jules and Louis Godard, Messrs. Nadar, de St. Martin, Delessert, the Prince Witgenstein, Tournachon, St. Felix, Paillar, Thirion an anonymous individual, and myself. M. Eugene Arnoult, the anonymous passenger, furnishes La Nation with the following account of the disastrous experiment, dated from Hanover, in Belgium. They left Paris at 5 minutes to 5 o'clock on the evening of the 15th ult: You saw us leave the Champ de Mars on Sunday. You were a witness of the majestic ascent of the Giant, raising into the air amid the applause of the crowd. They cried to us from below, "Bon voyage!" Alas! At nine o'clock at night we were at Erquelines, we passed over Malines; and towards midnight we were in Holland. We rose very high, but it was necessary to come down to see where we were. Ignoran
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 6
individual, and myself. M. Eugene Arnoult, the anonymous passenger, furnishes La Nation with the following account of the disastrous experiment, dated from Hanover, in Belgium. They left Paris at 5 minutes to 5 o'clock on the evening of the 15th ult: You saw us leave the Champ de Mars on Sunday. You were a witness of I felt myself humiliated at looking from the truss of straw at those clouds which in the night I had had under my feet. It was in this way we reached Ruthem, in Hanover. In seventeen hours we had made nearly two hundred and fifty leagues. Our course infernale had covered a space of three leagues. Now that it is over I haveThese Germans who surround us are brave people, and we have been as well cared for as the resources of the little spot will allow. P. S.--I have just reached Hanover with my companions, and reopen my letter to tell you so.--The King has sent an aide-de-camp to us. Are we at the end of our reverses? At any rate, I am consoled
St. Petersburg (Russia) (search for this): article 6
A disastrous balloon excursion. There was a grand balloon excursion from Paris three weeks ago. It was a monster balloon, and carried a two-story wicker house with thirteen persons in it. The trip was to be made to St. Petersburg, Russia, and a few days before the Emperor Napoleon had presented one of the proprietors of the balloon with $5,000, to aid in perfecting his scheme for navigating the air. The Constitutionnel gives the following account of the freight for the excursion: The balloon was called "The Giant;" it was white. The car carried some legs of mutton, ices a lobster, champagne, carriage wheels, Chateau Margany wine, swords, Lyons's sausages, guns, a wild boar's head, speaking trumpet, a dinner service in handsome porcelain, a printing press, a table, and everything necessary for photography. It was mounted by Madame La Princesse de la Tour d'auvergne, Jules and Louis Godard, Messrs. Nadar, de St. Martin, Delessert, the Prince Witgenstein, Tournachon, St. Fel
St. Martin (search for this): article 6
following account of the freight for the excursion: The balloon was called "The Giant;" it was white. The car carried some legs of mutton, ices a lobster, champagne, carriage wheels, Chateau Margany wine, swords, Lyons's sausages, guns, a wild boar's head, speaking trumpet, a dinner service in handsome porcelain, a printing press, a table, and everything necessary for photography. It was mounted by Madame La Princesse de la Tour d'auvergne, Jules and Louis Godard, Messrs. Nadar, de St. Martin, Delessert, the Prince Witgenstein, Tournachon, St. Felix, Paillar, Thirion an anonymous individual, and myself. M. Eugene Arnoult, the anonymous passenger, furnishes La Nation with the following account of the disastrous experiment, dated from Hanover, in Belgium. They left Paris at 5 minutes to 5 o'clock on the evening of the 15th ult: You saw us leave the Champ de Mars on Sunday. You were a witness of the majestic ascent of the Giant, raising into the air amid the applause
onnel gives the following account of the freight for the excursion: The balloon was called "The Giant;" it was white. The car carried some legs of mutton, ices a lobster, champagne, carriage wheels, Chateau Margany wine, swords, Lyons's sausages, guns, a wild boar's head, speaking trumpet, a dinner service in handsome porcelain, a printing press, a table, and everything necessary for photography. It was mounted by Madame La Princesse de la Tour d'auvergne, Jules and Louis Godard, Messrs. Nadar, de St. Martin, Delessert, the Prince Witgenstein, Tournachon, St. Felix, Paillar, Thirion an anonymous individual, and myself. M. Eugene Arnoult, the anonymous passenger, furnishes La Nation with the following account of the disastrous experiment, dated from Hanover, in Belgium. They left Paris at 5 minutes to 5 o'clock on the evening of the 15th ult: You saw us leave the Champ de Mars on Sunday. You were a witness of the majestic ascent of the Giant, raising into the air
Jules Godard (search for this): article 6
ived in the distance a red house — I see it now — the wind bore us straight for this house. It was death for all, for we should be dashed to pieces. No one spoke. Strange to say, of those nine persons, one of whom was a lady, who were clinging to a slender screen of osier, for whom every second seemed counted, not one had any fear. All tongues were mute, all faces were calm. Nadar held his wife, covering her with his body. Poor woman! Every shock seemed to break her to pieces. Jules Godard then tried and accomplished an act of sublime heroism. He clambered up into the netting, the shocks of which, were so terrible that three times he fell on my head. At length he reached the cord of the valve, opened it, and the gas having a way of escape the monster ceased to rise, but it still shot along in a horizontal line with prodigious rapidity. There were we squatting down upon the fall osier car. "Take care?" we cried, when a tree was in the way. We turned from it, and the tree
Delessert (search for this): article 6
count of the freight for the excursion: The balloon was called "The Giant;" it was white. The car carried some legs of mutton, ices a lobster, champagne, carriage wheels, Chateau Margany wine, swords, Lyons's sausages, guns, a wild boar's head, speaking trumpet, a dinner service in handsome porcelain, a printing press, a table, and everything necessary for photography. It was mounted by Madame La Princesse de la Tour d'auvergne, Jules and Louis Godard, Messrs. Nadar, de St. Martin, Delessert, the Prince Witgenstein, Tournachon, St. Felix, Paillar, Thirion an anonymous individual, and myself. M. Eugene Arnoult, the anonymous passenger, furnishes La Nation with the following account of the disastrous experiment, dated from Hanover, in Belgium. They left Paris at 5 minutes to 5 o'clock on the evening of the 15th ult: You saw us leave the Champ de Mars on Sunday. You were a witness of the majestic ascent of the Giant, raising into the air amid the applause of the cro
Constitutionnel (search for this): article 6
A disastrous balloon excursion. There was a grand balloon excursion from Paris three weeks ago. It was a monster balloon, and carried a two-story wicker house with thirteen persons in it. The trip was to be made to St. Petersburg, Russia, and a few days before the Emperor Napoleon had presented one of the proprietors of the balloon with $5,000, to aid in perfecting his scheme for navigating the air. The Constitutionnel gives the following account of the freight for the excursion: The balloon was called "The Giant;" it was white. The car carried some legs of mutton, ices a lobster, champagne, carriage wheels, Chateau Margany wine, swords, Lyons's sausages, guns, a wild boar's head, speaking trumpet, a dinner service in handsome porcelain, a printing press, a table, and everything necessary for photography. It was mounted by Madame La Princesse de la Tour d'auvergne, Jules and Louis Godard, Messrs. Nadar, de St. Martin, Delessert, the Prince Witgenstein, Tournachon, St. Fe
La Princesse De la Tour (search for this): article 6
erfecting his scheme for navigating the air. The Constitutionnel gives the following account of the freight for the excursion: The balloon was called "The Giant;" it was white. The car carried some legs of mutton, ices a lobster, champagne, carriage wheels, Chateau Margany wine, swords, Lyons's sausages, guns, a wild boar's head, speaking trumpet, a dinner service in handsome porcelain, a printing press, a table, and everything necessary for photography. It was mounted by Madame La Princesse de la Tour d'auvergne, Jules and Louis Godard, Messrs. Nadar, de St. Martin, Delessert, the Prince Witgenstein, Tournachon, St. Felix, Paillar, Thirion an anonymous individual, and myself. M. Eugene Arnoult, the anonymous passenger, furnishes La Nation with the following account of the disastrous experiment, dated from Hanover, in Belgium. They left Paris at 5 minutes to 5 o'clock on the evening of the 15th ult: You saw us leave the Champ de Mars on Sunday. You were a witness
chon, St. Felix, Paillar, Thirion an anonymous individual, and myself. M. Eugene Arnoult, the anonymous passenger, furnishes La Nation with the following account of the disastrous experiment, dated from Hanover, in Belgium. They left Paris at 5 minutes to 5 o'clock on the evening of the 15th ult: You saw us leave the Champ de Mars on Sunday. You were a witness of the majestic ascent of the Giant, raising into the air amid the applause of the crowd. They cried to us from below, "Bon voyage!" Alas! At nine o'clock at night we were at Erquelines, we passed over Malines; and towards midnight we were in Holland. We rose very high, but it was necessary to come down to see where we were. Ignorant of that, our position was a critical one. Below, as far as we could see, were marshes, and in the distance, we could hear the roar of the sea. We threw out ballast, and, mounting again, soon lost sight of the earth. What a night! Nobody slept, as you may suppose; for th
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