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Edward Leon (search for this): article 5
our men find it necessary to keep well under cover unless they are anxious to be made targets of. The enemy still present a strong front on the South bank of the Rapidan, and the river being very low makes guarding it a task of trying difficulty. Intercepted Correspondence — effect of the withdrawal of Mr. Mason from London — the emigration from Ireland to. The United States.--the feeling in France towards the Confederacy. The Northern papers publish the following letter from Mr. Ed. de Leon to Secretary Benjamin. It was captured on the Ella and Annie, a blockade running steamer; which was intercepted on her way from Nassau to Wilmington. They say that there are a great many more letters, which have been sent to Washington, and which will be published as soon as Lincoln is through with them: Paris, September 10, 1863. Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State, Richmond, Confederate States America: [No. 10.] Sir "Your dispatch No. 3, 15th August last, was deli
h bank of the Rapidan, and the river being very low makes guarding it a task of trying difficulty. Intercepted Correspondence — effect of the withdrawal of Mr. Mason from London — the emigration from Ireland to. The United States.--the feeling in France towards the Confederacy. The Northern papers publish the following leguage, on one measure of policy since adopted, would have been greatly modified, however unchanged my private opinion might have remained. The withdrawal of Mr. Mason from London has had Southern question, and awakening the public in England from their dream of continued non-intervention. From all sources of information in myir visit to Prince Maximilian, near Trieste, and some people hope he may say something hearing on our question. I entertain no such hope. The withdrawal of Mr. Mason from London makes the Emperor more than ever master of the situation, the only rivalry he feared being thus withdrawn. He can amuse us with Mexican alliances, i
papers. The American publishes the following list of articles sent from Baltimore for the relief of prisoners $2,000 in Virginia money. To Libby prison, 526 bbls flour, 13 bbls. mess beet, 12 bbls. mess pork, 1 bbl, corn meal, and I sack of sail, and the same amount to Belle Isle. The "loyal citizens" of Baltimore have contributed $272. The Federal authorities at Baltimore have received satisfactory letters that the articles sent are faithfully distributed. A Connecticut Chaplain named Trumbull, who left the Libby on the 11th inst., contributes the following to the narrative of grievances: The rations of meat to the officers in Libby prison had been stopped for two days, and was not likely to be resumed. The only ration served out to them was a small wedge of dry corn bread, weighing less than a half pound. This they were expected to subsist on for twenty-four hours. The officer in change confessed that the prisoners on Belle Isle were starving, and that he had not, and cou
red of them, but many more were entrapped by promise of high wages, their contract containing a clause that they would take the preliminary "oath of renunciation" on their arrival in America. This at once would make them subject to the draft. Another drag put upon them was the exhortation to the women to accompany their husbands, as the promised wages were so high, so that the Yankees now get a good deal of dross with their good metal. The number of actual recruits thus obtained from Ireland, for the past year, up to August, cannot have exceeded twenty thousand able-bodied men, but has probably reached that figure. When the harvest time is over the Yankees hope to make a grand haul, but we hope their nets will not hold. The men of intelligence who see the drain thus made of the very bone and sinew of the country, resist it from policy and patriotism. The priests, who are generally conscientious and earnest men, and who live on voluntary contributions of their parishioners, a
Connecticut Chaplain (search for this): article 5
phed to the Baltimore papers. The American publishes the following list of articles sent from Baltimore for the relief of prisoners $2,000 in Virginia money. To Libby prison, 526 bbls flour, 13 bbls. mess beet, 12 bbls. mess pork, 1 bbl, corn meal, and I sack of sail, and the same amount to Belle Isle. The "loyal citizens" of Baltimore have contributed $272. The Federal authorities at Baltimore have received satisfactory letters that the articles sent are faithfully distributed. A Connecticut Chaplain named Trumbull, who left the Libby on the 11th inst., contributes the following to the narrative of grievances: The rations of meat to the officers in Libby prison had been stopped for two days, and was not likely to be resumed. The only ration served out to them was a small wedge of dry corn bread, weighing less than a half pound. This they were expected to subsist on for twenty-four hours. The officer in change confessed that the prisoners on Belle Isle were starving, and tha
Vallandigham (search for this): article 5
make a raid upon the shipping. Additional information shows their design to turn and lay waste the cities of Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit, and every other town from Ogdensburg to Chicago, and to obliterate entirely the commerce of Lake Erie. Vallandigham, James Clay, and Marshal Kane, are said to have been the "arch-conspirators." Reports from Sandusky say that everything is quiet in that vicinity, and that all the preparations are made to guard against danger. There were no indications on th condition of our take coast and towns not only suggests but invites some such enterprise, and Detroit, from its location, seems best adapted for its execution. A dispatch from Washington says: It is understood here from Canada that Vallandigham, Hemy Clay's beautiful son James, and that pardoned villain, Marshal Kane, had fully arranged for passing through the Walland canal an armed steamer whose mission was: First--To open the prison doors for captive rebels at Sandusky bay. S
rteen thousand Richmond prisoners. In the name of their gallant deeds for their country's flag — in the name of the mothers and wives, and sisters and children, whose hearts are wrung with the tidings of their sufferings — in the name of the sensibilities of every loyal man in the Republic — in the name of civilization — in the name of humanity — in the name of God--we demand that these victims of Confederate fiendishness shall be rescued, at whatever cost." Miscellaneous. Major General Schenck, in Baltimore, has issued an order prohibiting any one visiting the Confederate prisoners in hospitals there. Brig.-Gen. Lockwood reports from Drummondtown, Va., on the 15th, his coast guard the day before captured a small party of Confederate raiders on the Chesapeake shore, and that on the same day one of his coasting vessels fell in with and captured Capt. John T. Beall himself, three commissioned officers, and six men. He thinks this will put an end to the depredations in
and sisters and children, whose hearts are wrung with the tidings of their sufferings — in the name of the sensibilities of every loyal man in the Republic — in the name of civilization — in the name of humanity — in the name of God--we demand that these victims of Confederate fiendishness shall be rescued, at whatever cost." Miscellaneous. Major General Schenck, in Baltimore, has issued an order prohibiting any one visiting the Confederate prisoners in hospitals there. Brig.-Gen. Lockwood reports from Drummondtown, Va., on the 15th, his coast guard the day before captured a small party of Confederate raiders on the Chesapeake shore, and that on the same day one of his coasting vessels fell in with and captured Capt. John T. Beall himself, three commissioned officers, and six men. He thinks this will put an end to the depredations in that department. The Yankee Government intends to recruit eleven regiments of negro troops in Maryland. Lincoln commenced the p
be kept up until nothing but a mass of sand and dirt remaing within which it will be impossible for either party to find refuge. The inert resistance of the vast mass of rubbish composing the gorge wall is very great, and to strengthen this the rebels have formed an immense traverse of sand bags. A great amount of labor must have been expended by them on this work, as the traverse is estimated to be twenty feet thick and from twenty to thirty feet high. Through both these obstructions Gen. Gillmore has to bore before he can effectively reach that part of the fort which is still tenable. Though slow, the work is sure to be accomplished. Already we can see changes in the aspect of the front against which our fire is directed, the wall of which is being perceptibly lowered and the sand barrier demolished, and not many days can elapse before the interior wall will he opened to a "fire in the rear," and the last rebel driven perforce from the stronghold they have so tenaciously held.
has been received that Gen. Lee is extending his "already formidable" works on the Rapidan. The railroad is now used by Meade as far as Warrenton Junction.--Gen. Meade and his Adjutant-General were in Washington on the 15th inst. A dispatch from tGen. Meade and his Adjutant-General were in Washington on the 15th inst. A dispatch from the army, dated the 14th, says: A reconnaissance was made by the enemy yesterday in the vicinity of Stevensburg, which is occupied by Kilpatrick's cavalry. Not more than half a dozen shells were thrown on either side, and on the advance of our fully pleasant, and the roads are still in excellent condition. The following is the dispatch sent by Lincoln to General Meade, and published to the army on the 10th instant: Washington, Monday, Nov. 9, 1863. Major Gen. Meade: I haMajor Gen. Meade: I have seen your dispatches about operations on the Rappahannock on Saturday, and I wish to say "Well done." A Lincoln. The barbarous habit of picket shooting has been revived by the rebels, and our men find it necessary to keep well under co
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