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following list of articles sent from Baltimore for the relief of prisoners $2,000 in Virginia money. To Libby prison, 526 bbls flour, 13 bbls. mess beet, 12 bbls. mess pork, 1 bbl, corn meal, and I sack of sail, and the same amount to Belle Isle. The "loyal citizens" of Baltimore have contributed $272. The Federal authorities at Baltimore have received satisfactory letters that the articles sent are faithfully distributed. A Connecticut Chaplain named Trumbull, who left the Libby on the 11th inst., contributes the following to the narrative of grievances: The rations of meat to the officers in Libby prison had been stopped for two days, and was not likely to be resumed. The only ration served out to them was a small wedge of dry corn bread, weighing less than a half pound. This they were expected to subsist on for twenty-four hours. The officer in change confessed that the prisoners on Belle Isle were starving, and that he had not, and could not, procure food for them. For t
d will be repaired and in running order to Culpeper on the 15th inst. The bridge to be placed across the river at Rappahannock Station is completed, and will be erected to-day or tomorrow. The railroad is in order to a point three miles west of Bealton, to which place trains run. The weather for two days past has been delightfully pleasant, and the roads are still in excellent condition. The following is the dispatch sent by Lincoln to General Meade, and published to the army on the 10th instant: Washington, Monday, Nov. 9, 1863. Major Gen. Meade: I have seen your dispatches about operations on the Rappahannock on Saturday, and I wish to say "Well done." A Lincoln. The barbarous habit of picket shooting has been revived by the rebels, and our men find it necessary to keep well under cover unless they are anxious to be made targets of. The enemy still present a strong front on the South bank of the Rapidan, and the river being very low makes guarding it a
November 9th, 1863 AD (search for this): article 5
er to Culpeper on the 15th inst. The bridge to be placed across the river at Rappahannock Station is completed, and will be erected to-day or tomorrow. The railroad is in order to a point three miles west of Bealton, to which place trains run. The weather for two days past has been delightfully pleasant, and the roads are still in excellent condition. The following is the dispatch sent by Lincoln to General Meade, and published to the army on the 10th instant: Washington, Monday, Nov. 9, 1863. Major Gen. Meade: I have seen your dispatches about operations on the Rappahannock on Saturday, and I wish to say "Well done." A Lincoln. The barbarous habit of picket shooting has been revived by the rebels, and our men find it necessary to keep well under cover unless they are anxious to be made targets of. The enemy still present a strong front on the South bank of the Rapidan, and the river being very low makes guarding it a task of trying difficulty. Inte
August 15th (search for this): article 5
letter from Mr. Ed. de Leon to Secretary Benjamin. It was captured on the Ella and Annie, a blockade running steamer; which was intercepted on her way from Nassau to Wilmington. They say that there are a great many more letters, which have been sent to Washington, and which will be published as soon as Lincoln is through with them: Paris, September 10, 1863. Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State, Richmond, Confederate States America: [No. 10.] Sir "Your dispatch No. 3, 15th August last, was delivered to me by Dr. Charles Girard, on the 16th instant, and in conformity with the instructions therein contained I write you, via Bermuda, by the first post, and shall continue my communications by each successive steamer for that port. Since your last dispatch was written you have doubtless received my Nos. 8 and 9, and it is scarcely necessary for me to observe that, had the views and intentions of the Administration been previously confided to me, the strength of my
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