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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 25, 1863., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Marysville (California, United States) (search for this): article 9
eye-witness. --Besides commissary and quartermaster stores there were a number of troops on their way to join their commands. London, Tenn., 4 P. M.--Our forces this morning advanced as far as Lenoir's Station, capturing a large number of wagons and prisoners. They are pressing the enemy considerably. Heavy and continuous firing has been going on all day. The result of the cannonading has not yet transpired. Gen. Wheeler sent back about one hundred and fifty prisoners, captured near Marysville. Wolford, the Federal cavalry officer, is trying to elude him. The conflict between the military and railroad authorities is still pending. No train has come up the road to-day, and I am informed the President of the railroad positively refuses to allow another train to come up the road unless the rebellious agents are unconditionally released.--The train which came up yesterday is still at Sweet Water. Consequently no mails either way, nor any certainty when there will be one.
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 9
The movements in Tennessee and Georgia. The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle, of the 22d inst., says: From a gentleman who left Rome yesterday, the Rebel learns that but little doubt is felt as to the crossing of Sherman's force at Whitesburg last Saturday. His force is variously estimated, some placing the figures at twenty two thousand. He has not exceeding eight or ten thousand men, that is the force he was reported to have when bellow Tuscumbia. It is not likely that he has been reinforced. He is said to be coming towards Rome, but it is more than probable that his main object is to cut the Western and Atlantic Railroad. Our authorities are aware of his movements, and will doubtless be prepared to receive him. A letter from Sweet Water, Tenn., gives some intelligence from Longstreet's army. It says: A train arrived here with commissary stores for the army, which should have been delivered the day before. The train was about half an hour behind its schedule t
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 9
The movements in Tennessee and Georgia. The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle, of the 22d inst., says: From a gentleman who left Rome yesterday, the Rebel learns that but little doubt is felt as to the crossing of Sherman's force at Whitesburg last Saturday. His force is variously estimated, some placing the figures at twenty two thousand. He has not exceeding eight or ten thousand men, that is the force he was reported to have when bellow Tuscumbia. It is not likely that he has been reiname is Worrell. Finally, Captain Rell, of the 2d Tennessee regiment, volunteered his services, and was put in charge of the train. I leave to your readers to draw their inference respecting the spirit of accommodation of the managers of the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad. Every word of the above statement I am prepared to substantiate, as I was an eye-witness. --Besides commissary and quartermaster stores there were a number of troops on their way to join their commands. London,
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 9
arrived here with commissary stores for the army, which should have been delivered the day before. The train was about half an hour behind its schedule time, and the conductor was about to unload the stores at this point and return the train to Dalton, when an officer attached to Gen. Longstreet's staff remonstrated with him, acquainted him with the nature of the case; and begged him to carry the provisions to the troops at London, only twelve miles further, and offered to send a man with a flconsequence was, the train still remained. From half-past 11 A. M. until 4 P. M. was consumed in vain entreaties to send the train the twelve miles. Finally the conductor suggested that Major Wallace, the President of the road, be telegraphed at Dalton, and, as he was acting under his positive instructions, the case might be settled. So argent was the case that any accommodation of the matter was eagerly sought, and Major Wallace was telegraphed a full statement of the facts. He declined maki
Whitesburg (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 9
The movements in Tennessee and Georgia. The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle, of the 22d inst., says: From a gentleman who left Rome yesterday, the Rebel learns that but little doubt is felt as to the crossing of Sherman's force at Whitesburg last Saturday. His force is variously estimated, some placing the figures at twenty two thousand. He has not exceeding eight or ten thousand men, that is the force he was reported to have when bellow Tuscumbia. It is not likely that he has been reinforced. He is said to be coming towards Rome, but it is more than probable that his main object is to cut the Western and Atlantic Railroad. Our authorities are aware of his movements, and will doubtless be prepared to receive him. A letter from Sweet Water, Tenn., gives some intelligence from Longstreet's army. It says: A train arrived here with commissary stores for the army, which should have been delivered the day before. The train was about half an hour behind its schedule ti
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 9
The movements in Tennessee and Georgia. The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle, of the 22d inst., says: From a gentleman who left Rome yesterday, the Rebel learns that but little doubt is felt as to the crossing of Sherman's force at Whitesburg last Saturday. His force is variously estimated, some placing the figures at twenty two thousand. He has not exceeding eight or ten thousand men, that is the force he was reported to have when bellow Tuscumbia. It is not likely that he has been reinforced. He is said to be coming towards Rome, but it is more than probable that his main object is to cut the Western and Atlantic Railroad. Our authorities are aware of his movements, and will doubtless be prepared to receive him. A letter from Sweet Water, Tenn., gives some intelligence from Longstreet's army. It says: A train arrived here with commissary stores for the army, which should have been delivered the day before. The train was about half an hour behind its schedule t
The movements in Tennessee and Georgia. The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle, of the 22d inst., says: From a gentleman who left Rome yesterday, the Rebel learns that but little doubt is felt as to the crossing of Sherman's force at Whitesburg last Saturday. His force is variously estimated, some placing the figures at twenty two thousand. He has not exceeding eight or ten thousand men, that is the force he was reported to have when bellow Tuscumbia. It is not likely that he has been reinforced. He is said to be coming towards Rome, but it is more than probable that his main object is to cut the Western and Atlantic Railroad. Our authorities are aware of his movements, and will doubtless be prepared to receive him. A letter from Sweet Water, Tenn., gives some intelligence from Longstreet's army. It says: A train arrived here with commissary stores for the army, which should have been delivered the day before. The train was about half an hour behind its schedule t
ntil 4 P. M. was consumed in vain entreaties to send the train the twelve miles. Finally the conductor suggested that Major Wallace, the President of the road, be telegraphed at Dalton, and, as he was acting under his positive instructions, the case might be settled. So argent was the case that any accommodation of the matter was eagerly sought, and Major Wallace was telegraphed a full statement of the facts. He declined making any reply. The officer insisted that the dispatch should again be presented to Major Wallace, and in a few minutes he received a reply from the Dalton operator that Wallace positively declined answering. About six o'clock the two trains from above came down, and the road was perfectly clear — but incredulous aWallace positively declined answering. About six o'clock the two trains from above came down, and the road was perfectly clear — but incredulous as it may appear, these "conscripts" refused even now to move up with the provisions, but insisted that they must remain at the depot until 10 ½ o'clock to-day, in order to be on schedule time. The engineer, a man of Northern birth, after night fall
Longstreet (search for this): article 9
Our authorities are aware of his movements, and will doubtless be prepared to receive him. A letter from Sweet Water, Tenn., gives some intelligence from Longstreet's army. It says: A train arrived here with commissary stores for the army, which should have been delivered the day before. The train was about half an hour behind its schedule time, and the conductor was about to unload the stores at this point and return the train to Dalton, when an officer attached to Gen. Longstreet's staff remonstrated with him, acquainted him with the nature of the case; and begged him to carry the provisions to the troops at London, only twelve miles furthetime.--The officer then produced an order from the Chief Commissary of the corps, saying "send up the stores as soon as they arrive,--, and, if necessary, use Gen. Longstreet's name in forcing the engineers to bring up the cars." The commandant of the post was then appealed to and he placed the train under a guard, but did not, unf
ry word of the above statement I am prepared to substantiate, as I was an eye-witness. --Besides commissary and quartermaster stores there were a number of troops on their way to join their commands. London, Tenn., 4 P. M.--Our forces this morning advanced as far as Lenoir's Station, capturing a large number of wagons and prisoners. They are pressing the enemy considerably. Heavy and continuous firing has been going on all day. The result of the cannonading has not yet transpired. Gen. Wheeler sent back about one hundred and fifty prisoners, captured near Marysville. Wolford, the Federal cavalry officer, is trying to elude him. The conflict between the military and railroad authorities is still pending. No train has come up the road to-day, and I am informed the President of the railroad positively refuses to allow another train to come up the road unless the rebellious agents are unconditionally released.--The train which came up yesterday is still at Sweet Water. Conse
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