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Missionary Ridge, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 9
he army have not been changed. With this great and almost impassable wall on our left, effectually barring the advance of the enemy from that direction, and Missionary Ridge, with its steep sides, on our front, no General can ask a more desirable place of defence than that which is now held by this army. If the enemy have sutters are frequently sent, and sometimes travel is also permitted. Mrs. Gen. Helm passed through the other day. A letter to the Atlanta Register dated Missionary Ridge, Nov. 15, says: The signal corps, under the supervision of Captain G. C. Bain, has proven itself to be a valuable organization. Lookout Mountain converses with Missionary Ridge with expedition. Messages are borne on the air for five and six miles with a celerity barely to be believed. The signal flag transmits messages and orders throughout the whole army. Some of the corps having been consolidated, and all placed under the command of the untiring and indefatigable Bain, its
Lookout Mountain, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 9
ing to and from Chattanooga in the rear. Secondly. We could not extend our lines beyond Lookout Mountain to the left, because of the disintegration of our forces which would be necessarily involve preparation to give them battle. Both Generals Bragg and Longstreet were on the summit of Lookout Mountain, observing the movements of the enemy above and below — the six thousand at Brown's Ferry, across Brown's Ferry three times more expeditiously than we could have thrown troops across Lookout Mountain, (through a demoralizing fire,) and sweeping down on our rear, or even encountering our frour bane during the winter. Finally. We have not "lost the advantages of our position." Lookout Mountain is still in our possession, and, to all intents and purposes, the lines of the army have noer the supervision of Captain G. C. Bain, has proven itself to be a valuable organization. Lookout Mountain converses with Missionary Ridge with expedition. Messages are borne on the air for five an
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): article 9
e correctness of the judgment by which that concession was made. It is an error, too, to suppose that the mere possession of Chattanooga is the stake for which this army is contending, and the fact that the Federals may remain undisturbed there during the winter adds and subtracts nothing from our prospects of success. In truth, there are many officers who believe that we are better off where we are, with a railroad at our back, than if we were forty miles on the other side of the Tennessee river and dependent for supplies on the rugged roads and faulty wagons, which would be our bane during the winter. Finally. We have not "lost the advantages of our position." Lookout Mountain is still in our possession, and, to all intents and purposes, the lines of the army have not been changed. With this great and almost impassable wall on our left, effectually barring the advance of the enemy from that direction, and Missionary Ridge, with its steep sides, on our front, no General c
lieve me sincere when I say that I never felt more hopeful? I believe we shall winter around Nashville. If Gen. Longstreet gobbles Burnside, as I think he will, Grant must retreat from Chattanooga. And as sure as we get him moved we will keep him moving. The prospect is very cheerful. A large army, an animated spirit, a programme well arranged, nothing but extraordinary bad luck will foil our plans. It is true that we need Forrest. It is true that we shall miss Polk. It is true that Gen. Lee would inspire a deeper confidence. But it is equally true that things are not so bad as they seem, and that General Hardee's presence, his energy, his great talent for discipline, and his fine mind, have corrected a multitude of errors. The Yankees down in Chattanooga are a sorry looking set of fellows, certain. They burrow away in the ground and are as muddy as minks. The pickets are now on mighty friendly terms. They converse freely, joke each other, and sometimes treat. You can
great river. Will you believe me sincere when I say that I never felt more hopeful? I believe we shall winter around Nashville. If Gen. Longstreet gobbles Burnside, as I think he will, Grant must retreat from Chattanooga. And as sure as we get him moved we will keep him moving. The prospect is very cheerful. A large army, an animated spirit, a programme well arranged, nothing but extraordinary bad luck will foil our plans. It is true that we need Forrest. It is true that we shall miss Polk. It is true that Gen. Lee would inspire a deeper confidence. But it is equally true that things are not so bad as they seem, and that General Hardee's presence, his energy, his great talent for discipline, and his fine mind, have corrected a multitude of errors. The Yankees down in Chattanooga are a sorry looking set of fellows, certain. They burrow away in the ground and are as muddy as minks. The pickets are now on mighty friendly terms. They converse freely, joke each other, and
problem while the two armies confront each other intact. A correspondent of the Atlanta Confederacy, writing on the 20th, says: I notice in the few papers that now and then reach this elevated region that some despondency is felt by those at a distance concerning the situation of the campaign which extends itself along this great river. Will you believe me sincere when I say that I never felt more hopeful? I believe we shall winter around Nashville. If Gen. Longstreet gobbles Burnside, as I think he will, Grant must retreat from Chattanooga. And as sure as we get him moved we will keep him moving. The prospect is very cheerful. A large army, an animated spirit, a programme well arranged, nothing but extraordinary bad luck will foil our plans. It is true that we need Forrest. It is true that we shall miss Polk. It is true that Gen. Lee would inspire a deeper confidence. But it is equally true that things are not so bad as they seem, and that General Hardee's presen
paign which extends itself along this great river. Will you believe me sincere when I say that I never felt more hopeful? I believe we shall winter around Nashville. If Gen. Longstreet gobbles Burnside, as I think he will, Grant must retreat from Chattanooga. And as sure as we get him moved we will keep him moving. The prospect is very cheerful. A large army, an animated spirit, a programme well arranged, nothing but extraordinary bad luck will foil our plans. It is true that we need Forrest. It is true that we shall miss Polk. It is true that Gen. Lee would inspire a deeper confidence. But it is equally true that things are not so bad as they seem, and that General Hardee's presence, his energy, his great talent for discipline, and his fine mind, have corrected a multitude of errors. The Yankees down in Chattanooga are a sorry looking set of fellows, certain. They burrow away in the ground and are as muddy as minks. The pickets are now on mighty friendly terms. They
The Yankees down in Chattanooga are a sorry looking set of fellows, certain. They burrow away in the ground and are as muddy as minks. The pickets are now on mighty friendly terms. They converse freely, joke each other, and sometimes treat. You can ride from one end of our line of sharpshooters to the other without receiving a shot. Papers are not permitted to be exchanged. Flags of truce ply daily. By these, letters are frequently sent, and sometimes travel is also permitted. Mrs. Gen. Helm passed through the other day. A letter to the Atlanta Register dated Missionary Ridge, Nov. 15, says: The signal corps, under the supervision of Captain G. C. Bain, has proven itself to be a valuable organization. Lookout Mountain converses with Missionary Ridge with expedition. Messages are borne on the air for five and six miles with a celerity barely to be believed. The signal flag transmits messages and orders throughout the whole army. Some of the corps having been c
The position of affairs before the battle of Lookout Mountain. Anything from Gen. Bragg's army is interesting just now. The army correspondent of the Charleston Courier gives a view of the position of affairs before the battle of Lookout Mountain which will enlighten our readers relative to the situation as it then stood. Tneral Law, every pound having to be carried at night, in panniers, on the backs of mules. Thirdly. The advance of the Federals from Bridgeport was known to General Bragg from the start, and progress was reported from hour to hour as the troops marched up the valley. (This fact I learn from one of the signal officers.) Consequently there was no surprise and no lack of time for adequate preparation to give them battle. Both Generals Bragg and Longstreet were on the summit of Lookout Mountain, observing the movements of the enemy above and below — the six thousand at Brown's Ferry, who had already crossed the Tennessee from Chattanooga, and the eleven th
G. C. Bain (search for this): article 9
etters are frequently sent, and sometimes travel is also permitted. Mrs. Gen. Helm passed through the other day. A letter to the Atlanta Register dated Missionary Ridge, Nov. 15, says: The signal corps, under the supervision of Captain G. C. Bain, has proven itself to be a valuable organization. Lookout Mountain converses with Missionary Ridge with expedition. Messages are borne on the air for five and six miles with a celerity barely to be believed. The signal flag transmits messages and orders throughout the whole army. Some of the corps having been consolidated, and all placed under the command of the untiring and indefatigable Bain, its efficiency and discipline will be more perfect, and its services far more useful. The signal corps always on the qui vive, their flag reports every movement of the enemy by day, while their land torch is ever watchful by night. The roads are in a fine condition, and the weather beautiful. The army is losing no time in pre
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