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Shenandoah (United States) (search for this): article 5
Depredations of the enemy in Shenandoah. --The Yankees who made a raid up the Valley to Mt. Jackson, a little more than a fortnight ago, behaved as thieves on their return through Woodstock. They had succeeded in robbing Mrs. Scheffes, whose husband was of several barrels of brandy, and after getting drunk were, of course, a great deal meaner than they were when --They robbed the stores in Woodstock of whatever they could lay their hands on, carrying off and destroying at least $40,000 worth of goods. They carried out sacks of salt and strewed it on the and committed other mean and wanton acts, which would disgrace any other but Abolition soldiers.
Depredations of the enemy in Shenandoah. --The Yankees who made a raid up the Valley to Mt. Jackson, a little more than a fortnight ago, behaved as thieves on their return through Woodstock. They had succeeded in robbing Mrs. Scheffes, whose husband was of several barrels of brandy, and after getting drunk were, of course, a great deal meaner than they were when --They robbed the stores in Woodstock of whatever they could lay their hands on, carrying off and destroying at least $40,000 worth of goods. They carried out sacks of salt and strewed it on the and committed other mean and wanton acts, which would disgrace any other but Abolition soldiers.