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Pigeon Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 7
disappears in a series of kills a few miles below Chattanooga, only to reappear again under the name of Peavine Ridge, and again lower down under the name of Pigeon Mountain; the latter uniting near the Alabama line with Lookout Mountain, and forming an acute angle. --The space enclosed between these two mountains is known as McLemore's Cove, the entrance to which from the west is by Stephens's and Cooper's Gaps in Lookout Mountain, and from the east by Dug Gap in Pigeon Mountain. North of Chattanooga and beyond the Tennessee are Walden's Ridge and the Cumberland Mountains proper stretching away to the northeast. The distance from Chattanooga to Trenton, in Willa's Valley, and thence through Stephens's and Cooper's Gaps in Lookout Mountain to Lafayette and Dalton, passing through McLemore's Cove and across Pigeon Mountain at Dug Gap. Rome is about sixty-five miles southwest of Chattanooga, and is reached by a good wagon road, which passes through Lafayette, about twenty-three
Walden's Ridge (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
below Chattanooga, only to reappear again under the name of Peavine Ridge, and again lower down under the name of Pigeon Mountain; the latter uniting near the Alabama line with Lookout Mountain, and forming an acute angle. --The space enclosed between these two mountains is known as McLemore's Cove, the entrance to which from the west is by Stephens's and Cooper's Gaps in Lookout Mountain, and from the east by Dug Gap in Pigeon Mountain. North of Chattanooga and beyond the Tennessee are Walden's Ridge and the Cumberland Mountains proper stretching away to the northeast. The distance from Chattanooga to Trenton is twenty miles; to Bridgeport, twenty-eight; to Caperton's Ferry, on the Tennessee, opposite Stevenson, about forty. From Caperton's ferry there is a public road leading across Sand Mountain to Trenton, in Willa's Valley, and thence through Stephens's and Cooper's Gaps in Lookout Mountain to Lafayette and Dalton, passing through McLemore's Cove and across Pigeon Mountain
Ringgold, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 7
pon Crittenden, who, having crossed the Chickamauga with a part of his corps, and sent the remainder in the direction of Ringgold, advanced beyond Lee and Gordon's Mills, and crush him before Thomas or McCook could reach him. Forrest, Pegram, and Armpon Crittenden, whose forces, it will be borne in mind, were not concentrated, a portion having gone in the direction of Ringgold. Generals Cheatham and Walker left Lafayette at noon, and General Hindman at night. Gen. Polk reached Rock Spring at dt and right flank, and Wheeler to pass to the left of Polk and protect his flank. Gen. Bushrod Johnson's brigade was at Ringgold, to which point the reinforcements as they arrived at Atlanta were directed. These orders were executed on the afternoois not little reason to doubt that the Confederate army would to-day be in Nashville or beyond, instead of at Dalton and Ringgold. Whose fault is it that we are not now well on the way to the Chief. Is it Gen. Bragg's? Let the people do justice, ev
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 7
e the point where the river cleaves its way through the great Cumberland Mountains. On the South side of the river these mountains are known by different names, and, like the river, they run in a southwesterly direction, finally disappearing in Alabama. Raccoon Mountain and Sand Mountain, which lie next to the river, are parts of the same range, being separated by Nickajack Cove. To the east of this range, and separated by a narrow valley, is Lookout Mountain. This valley is known as Lookoutupon the Tennessee river. Missionary Ridge disappears in a series of kills a few miles below Chattanooga, only to reappear again under the name of Peavine Ridge, and again lower down under the name of Pigeon Mountain; the latter uniting near the Alabama line with Lookout Mountain, and forming an acute angle. --The space enclosed between these two mountains is known as McLemore's Cove, the entrance to which from the west is by Stephens's and Cooper's Gaps in Lookout Mountain, and from the east b
Alpine, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 7
ing down Wills's Valley in advance of Thomas, were endeavoring to cross the mountain opposite to Alpine, fifteen or twenty miles southwest of Lafayette, for the purpose of destroying our lines of comen divided, and one-half sent through Stephens's Gap to cut off McCook, then many miles below at Alpine, and the other thrown back upon Crittenden. Thus, with but trifling loss on our part, would havhe meantime, whilst Crittenden was thus slipping from the hands of Gen. Polk, McCook had reached Alpine, distant about twenty miles to the southwest of Lafayette. On Sunday the 13th, his advance cavalry appeared in sight of Lafayette, on the Alpine road, and vigorously assaulted the picket line of Gen. Breckinridge; but they were quickly repulsed and considerably damaged. The events here relnew base at Chattanooga. Accordingly, on the 13th McCook was directed to retrace his steps from Alpine, and send two divisions of his corps to support Gen. Thomas. He was ordered to reach Daugherty'
Chattanooga Valley (United States) (search for this): article 7
outhwesterly direction, finally disappearing in Alabama. Raccoon Mountain and Sand Mountain, which lie next to the river, are parts of the same range, being separated by Nickajack Cove. To the east of this range, and separated by a narrow valley, is Lookout Mountain. This valley is known as Lookout Valley up to the water-shed, and as Willis's Valley beyond, the dividing line being where the water runs northeast and southwest in opposite directions. To the east of Lookout Mountain is Chattanooga Valley, so called after the creek of that name, and then comes, still further to the east Missionary Ridge. Each one of these mountain ranges abuts upon the Tennessee river. Missionary Ridge disappears in a series of kills a few miles below Chattanooga, only to reappear again under the name of Peavine Ridge, and again lower down under the name of Pigeon Mountain; the latter uniting near the Alabama line with Lookout Mountain, and forming an acute angle. --The space enclosed between these two
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): article 7
d southwest in opposite directions. To the east of Lookout Mountain is Chattanooga Valley, so called after the creek of that name, and then comes, still further to the east Missionary Ridge. Each one of these mountain ranges abuts upon the Tennessee river. Missionary Ridge disappears in a series of kills a few miles below Chattanooga, only to reappear again under the name of Peavine Ridge, and again lower down under the name of Pigeon Mountain; the latter uniting near the Alabama line with Lo McCook's, and Granger's — the whole numbering about 75,000 men, exclusive of Stanley's cavalry corps, estimated at 15,000, making 90,000 in all. Crittenden's corps having taken position immediately beyond the heights which overlook the Tennessee river opposite Chattanooga, the main body of the enemy, consisting of Thomas's and McCook's corps, (Granger's being held in reserve,) crossed the river on the 1st of September at Caperton's Ferry, and moved across Sand Mountain into Wills's Valley
Raccoon Mountains (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
e physical difficulties against which the Confederates have had to contend — difficulties not less serious than the great superiority of the enemy's forces. Chattanooga, as is well known, is situated in a bend in the Tennessee just above the point where the river cleaves its way through the great Cumberland Mountains. On the South side of the river these mountains are known by different names, and, like the river, they run in a southwesterly direction, finally disappearing in Alabama. Raccoon Mountain and Sand Mountain, which lie next to the river, are parts of the same range, being separated by Nickajack Cove. To the east of this range, and separated by a narrow valley, is Lookout Mountain. This valley is known as Lookout Valley up to the water-shed, and as Willis's Valley beyond, the dividing line being where the water runs northeast and southwest in opposite directions. To the east of Lookout Mountain is Chattanooga Valley, so called after the creek of that name, and then comes
Cooper's Gap (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 7
igeon Mountain; the latter uniting near the Alabama line with Lookout Mountain, and forming an acute angle. --The space enclosed between these two mountains is known as McLemore's Cove, the entrance to which from the west is by Stephens's and Cooper's Gaps in Lookout Mountain, and from the east by Dug Gap in Pigeon Mountain. North of Chattanooga and beyond the Tennessee are Walden's Ridge and the Cumberland Mountains proper stretching away to the northeast. The distance from Chattanooga t; to Bridgeport, twenty-eight; to Caperton's Ferry, on the Tennessee, opposite Stevenson, about forty. From Caperton's ferry there is a public road leading across Sand Mountain to Trenton, in Willa's Valley, and thence through Stephens's and Cooper's Gaps in Lookout Mountain to Lafayette and Dalton, passing through McLemore's Cove and across Pigeon Mountain at Dug Gap. Rome is about sixty-five miles southwest of Chattanooga, and is reached by a good wagon road, which passes through Lafayette
Chattanooga Creek (United States) (search for this): article 7
ce of the enemy, supposed to be a portion of Thomas's corps, had emerged from Wills's Valley through Stephens's Gap into McLemore's Cove. This cove or valley is from five to six miles in width at its widest part, and opens out into the level country east of the Lookout range, nearly opposite to Lee's and Gordon's Milist the place known as Crawfish Springs being situated directly in its entrance or mouth. Along its lowest level, but separated by a prolongation of Missionary Ridge, run Chattanooga creek and the Chickamauga, on their way to the Tennessee, into which they empty their waters, the former between Chattanooga and the base of Lookout, and the latter about five miles above Chattanooga. There are several good roads in the cove, the intersection of the principal one of which with the road leading from Stephens's Gap, through Dug Gap, to Lafayette, constitutes what is known as Davies's Cross Roads. It having been ascertained that the force in the cove did not exceed eight
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