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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 2, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
he can shove the croakers and grumblers into a more hopeful and manly attitude; but we submit that they are not the true exponents of the spirit and sentiment of the country. Coming in contact chiefly with citizens, and not with soldiers, it is natural that a stranger should express the opinions we find in the letters of the Times. But the country is now to be found in the army, not among those who stay at home. The heart, the brains, the bravery, the patriotism, the chivalry of the Confederate States are to be found in front of the foe, and not in the pursuits of civil life. We must look to the army if we want to know whether the faith and hope of the South are equal to the hope and faith of the North in the issue of this contest. And never did hope and faith burn brighter in human hearts than in those which are ready to shed their last drop of blood in the cause. It is stated by those who have recently visited the army that it is really a relief to get away from the gloomy atmo
For hire --A likely young negro Woman without encumbrance, who is a first rate washer and ironer and house servant. Price no object, if a good and suitable home can be procured. Apply to A L Shepherd, Post Comm'y Dep't, 31 Pearl st. fe 2--1t*
For hire --A likely young negro Woman without encumbrance, who is a first rate washer and ironer and house servant. Price no object, if a good and suitable home can be procured. Apply to A L Shepherd, Post Comm'y Dep't, 31 Pearl st. fe 2--1t*
on account of the Commissioners offering for sale premises actually occupied by the military, and found to be indispensable for the need of the service. This is a point that certainly claims the serious attention of the Commissioners. Display of Canadian affection for the Yankees. The following letter is from Acting Volunteer Lieutenant-Commanding Edward F. Devens, to Secretary Welles, in relation to the treatment of the officers and crew of the U. S. steamer Howqua, at Halifax, in June last: Charlestown, July 3, 1863. --Sir: --During the recent cruise of the steamer Howqua under my command, it became necessary for me to put into the port of Halifax for coal, and would most respectfully call your attention to the many insults offered to, and the outrageous manner in which my officers and self were treated by the citizens of the place. A portion of the facts are as follows:-- As the Howqua was dropping away from the coal wharf one of the crew attempted to d
July 3rd, 1863 AD (search for this): article 10
fering for sale premises actually occupied by the military, and found to be indispensable for the need of the service. This is a point that certainly claims the serious attention of the Commissioners. Display of Canadian affection for the Yankees. The following letter is from Acting Volunteer Lieutenant-Commanding Edward F. Devens, to Secretary Welles, in relation to the treatment of the officers and crew of the U. S. steamer Howqua, at Halifax, in June last: Charlestown, July 3, 1863. --Sir: --During the recent cruise of the steamer Howqua under my command, it became necessary for me to put into the port of Halifax for coal, and would most respectfully call your attention to the many insults offered to, and the outrageous manner in which my officers and self were treated by the citizens of the place. A portion of the facts are as follows:-- As the Howqua was dropping away from the coal wharf one of the crew attempted to desert, when three of my officers we
from the coal wharf one of the crew attempted to desert, when three of my officers went on the wharf for the purpose of arresting said deserter; they were mobbed by the citizens of the place, knocked down, badly bruised, and otherwise treated in a most shameful manner, and the deserter rescued from them. In passing through the streets I was subjected to the most trying insults. As the vessel proceeded down the harbor crowds collected on the end of the wharf, cheering for the rebels and Jeff, Davis. Men came down and tried to induce my men to desert, while others came around the ship with Secession flags and singing Secession songs. As not the slightest cause for insult was offered by my officers, I attribute the treatment we received to the fact of our being Northern officers, and to the sympathy of the citizens of Halifax with the rebels. Your most obedient servant, Edward F. Devens, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant-Commanding. The Yankee army and navy Statistics.
March 24th (search for this): article 10
ave done so. One was dismissed for surrendering his command in the face of the enemy, and one made an attempt to desert to the rebels. 242 of them resigned, 26 were dismissed, and 9 dropped. Miscellaneous. The prize steamer R. E. Lee has been strictly searched at Boston in an expectation that gold would be found. One hundred and eight packages were found behind a partition supposed to divide the machinery from the hold. They are valued at twenty thousand dollars. The Pennsylvania Democratic State committee have issued a call for a State Convention, to be held at Philadelphia on the 24th of March. The Chinese have adopted a national ensign.--Hitherto they have had only local and individual flags. Lincoln has signified his intention of granting to prisoners of war in certain cases the privilege of accepting the terms of the Amnesty Proclamation. It is officially reported that there are twelve hundred cases of small pox in the whole District of Columbia.
letter from there dated the 21s ult. It says: The shelling of Charleston from Fort Putnam is continued night and day at intervals of ten minutes. One gun alone has fired over 1,100 rounds at an elevation of forty degrees. Charleston is gradually crumbling under this incessant bombardment. We often observe dense clouds of smoke arising from some portion of the city, which is considered good evidence that our firing is effective. Occasionally we send a few missiles to Moultrie or Johnson, or some other rebel work, which are reluctantly replied to by the enemy. For some weeks past the enemy has evinced an unmistakable desire to be let alone. He invariably waits an attack before using his pieces. We do not observed any changes of note along the borders of the rebellions. The iron-clad fleet remain on picket duty off Charleston, notwithstanding rumors to the effect that a number of the monitors had been dispatched for service to the Gulf. The Court of Inquiry institute
ve done so. One was dismissed for surrendering his command in the face of the enemy, and one made an attempt to desert to the rebels. 242 of them resigned, 26 were dismissed, and 9 dropped. Miscellaneous. The prize steamer R. E. Lee has been strictly searched at Boston in an expectation that gold would be found. One hundred and eight packages were found behind a partition supposed to divide the machinery from the hold. They are valued at twenty thousand dollars. The Pennsylvania Democratic State committee have issued a call for a State Convention, to be held at Philadelphia on the 24th of March. The Chinese have adopted a national ensign.--Hitherto they have had only local and individual flags. Lincoln has signified his intention of granting to prisoners of war in certain cases the privilege of accepting the terms of the Amnesty Proclamation. It is officially reported that there are twelve hundred cases of small pox in the whole District of Columbia.
several bureaus of the department and for navy-yards, docks, and miscellaneous expenditures. The pay of officers, seamen, and engineers requires $19,423,000; and for construction and repair, $20,800,000; and for armor plated vessels, $3,000,000; materials, $700,000, fuel, $3,840,000; equipment, $3,000,000; provisions, $6,416,000; construction and repair of machinery, $28,312,000; surgeons' appliances and medicines, $8,300,000; navigation apparatus and supplies, $126,000. Assistant Adjutant General Townsend has made a report, containing a list of all the known desertions of non-commissioned officers and privates from the regular army to the rebels. The number is only 28, of whom 20 are from the 8th United States infantry. He also furnishes a list of the officers who have left the service by resignation or desertion, to engage in the rebellion. The total number is 277, of whom 183 entered the rebel service, and 92 are presumed to have done so. One was dismissed for surrendering
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