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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 2, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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he coal wharf one of the crew attempted to desert, when three of my officers went on the wharf for the purpose of arresting said deserter; they were mobbed by the citizens of the place, knocked down, badly bruised, and otherwise treated in a most shameful manner, and the deserter rescued from them. In passing through the streets I was subjected to the most trying insults. As the vessel proceeded down the harbor crowds collected on the end of the wharf, cheering for the rebels and Jeff, Davis. Men came down and tried to induce my men to desert, while others came around the ship with Secession flags and singing Secession songs. As not the slightest cause for insult was offered by my officers, I attribute the treatment we received to the fact of our being Northern officers, and to the sympathy of the citizens of Halifax with the rebels. Your most obedient servant, Edward F. Devens, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant-Commanding. The Yankee army and navy Statistics. The
the entire mass to the surface must necessarily be of the best material and of extensive proportions. A few adjuncts, in the way of machinery, will soon be supplied, when the labor will be resumed. It is believed the bodies — with two or three exceptions — of the unfortunate men who went down in the Weehawken, are still encased in the cabin and turret. The exceptions refer to the bodies washed upon the beach a few days after the accident occurred. The subjoined circular, issued by Gen. Saxton, has been extensively circulated about Beaufort and the adjacent Islands. It will be observed that the General gives wholesome advice to the people concerning matters appertaining to the purchase and culture of the soil. Pursuant to instructions from Washington the tax commissioners notified the public that they would be ready to dispose of the lands at Beaufort on Monday last. At 10 A. M., the hour appointed, the apartment in which the commissioners convened was densely crowded with o
dings as may be required for use by the military authorities. I learn some dissatisfaction has been expressed on account of the Commissioners offering for sale premises actually occupied by the military, and found to be indispensable for the need of the service. This is a point that certainly claims the serious attention of the Commissioners. Display of Canadian affection for the Yankees. The following letter is from Acting Volunteer Lieutenant-Commanding Edward F. Devens, to Secretary Welles, in relation to the treatment of the officers and crew of the U. S. steamer Howqua, at Halifax, in June last: Charlestown, July 3, 1863. --Sir: --During the recent cruise of the steamer Howqua under my command, it became necessary for me to put into the port of Halifax for coal, and would most respectfully call your attention to the many insults offered to, and the outrageous manner in which my officers and self were treated by the citizens of the place. A portion of the f
Edward F. Devens (search for this): article 10
be indispensable for the need of the service. This is a point that certainly claims the serious attention of the Commissioners. Display of Canadian affection for the Yankees. The following letter is from Acting Volunteer Lieutenant-Commanding Edward F. Devens, to Secretary Welles, in relation to the treatment of the officers and crew of the U. S. steamer Howqua, at Halifax, in June last: Charlestown, July 3, 1863. --Sir: --During the recent cruise of the steamer Howqua und not the slightest cause for insult was offered by my officers, I attribute the treatment we received to the fact of our being Northern officers, and to the sympathy of the citizens of Halifax with the rebels. Your most obedient servant, Edward F. Devens, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant-Commanding. The Yankee army and navy Statistics. The Naval bill as reported to-day from the Committee of Ways and Mesas, appropriates for the ordinary operations of the navy proper about $97,000,000, i
John Washington (search for this): article 10
he unfortunate men who went down in the Weehawken, are still encased in the cabin and turret. The exceptions refer to the bodies washed upon the beach a few days after the accident occurred. The subjoined circular, issued by Gen. Saxton, has been extensively circulated about Beaufort and the adjacent Islands. It will be observed that the General gives wholesome advice to the people concerning matters appertaining to the purchase and culture of the soil. Pursuant to instructions from Washington the tax commissioners notified the public that they would be ready to dispose of the lands at Beaufort on Monday last. At 10 A. M., the hour appointed, the apartment in which the commissioners convened was densely crowded with officers, soldiers, and contraband — the latter class in the preponderance. Unfortunately the weather was inclement, in consequence of which the sale was postponed till the following day. At the hour announced the commissioners, accompanied by a crowd of expectant
United States (United States) (search for this): article 10
United States intelligence. The siege of Charleston — Sales of Confiscated property. The latest intelligence about the siege of Charleston we find in a letter from there dated the 21s ult. It says: The shelling of Charleston from Fort Putnam is continued night and day at intervals of ten minutes. One gun alone has fired over 1,100 rounds at an elevation of forty degrees. Charleston is gradually crumbling under this incessant bombardment. We often observe dense clouds of smoke arising from some portion of the city, which is considered good evidence that our firing is effective. Occasionally we send a few missiles to Moultrie or Johnson, or some other rebel work, which are reluctantly replied to by the enemy. For some weeks past the enemy has evinced an unmistakable desire to be let alone. He invariably waits an attack before using his pieces. We do not observed any changes of note along the borders of the rebellions. The iron-clad fleet remain on picket duty
Canadian (United States) (search for this): article 10
be occupied in disposing of the entire lands. By the terms of the instructions the Commissioners are empowered to reserve such buildings as may be required for use by the military authorities. I learn some dissatisfaction has been expressed on account of the Commissioners offering for sale premises actually occupied by the military, and found to be indispensable for the need of the service. This is a point that certainly claims the serious attention of the Commissioners. Display of Canadian affection for the Yankees. The following letter is from Acting Volunteer Lieutenant-Commanding Edward F. Devens, to Secretary Welles, in relation to the treatment of the officers and crew of the U. S. steamer Howqua, at Halifax, in June last: Charlestown, July 3, 1863. --Sir: --During the recent cruise of the steamer Howqua under my command, it became necessary for me to put into the port of Halifax for coal, and would most respectfully call your attention to the many insul
Fort Putnam (New York, United States) (search for this): article 10
United States intelligence. The siege of Charleston — Sales of Confiscated property. The latest intelligence about the siege of Charleston we find in a letter from there dated the 21s ult. It says: The shelling of Charleston from Fort Putnam is continued night and day at intervals of ten minutes. One gun alone has fired over 1,100 rounds at an elevation of forty degrees. Charleston is gradually crumbling under this incessant bombardment. We often observe dense clouds of smoke arising from some portion of the city, which is considered good evidence that our firing is effective. Occasionally we send a few missiles to Moultrie or Johnson, or some other rebel work, which are reluctantly replied to by the enemy. For some weeks past the enemy has evinced an unmistakable desire to be let alone. He invariably waits an attack before using his pieces. We do not observed any changes of note along the borders of the rebellions. The iron-clad fleet remain on picket duty
disposed of by the Mayor yesterday morning: In the case of Henry, slave of Wm. Lewis, charged with stealing a cow belonging to Mrs. Dougherty, in Port Mayor His Honor concluded, as the offence was committed in the county of Henrico, he had no jurisdiction about the matter, and therefore referred it to a county Magistrate. Twenty five lashes were ordered to be given Albert, a negro fellow in the employ of the Confederate States, for having in his possession a loaded rifle. Dandridge, the property of Robert Oliver, was ordered thirty lashes for stealing twelve salt fish from Michael Oliver. The examination of Noble, a negro boy, formerly employed at the American Hotel, arrested on the charge of stealing, some time since, from the store room of the American Hotel about $5,000 worth of sugar, was postponed on account of the absence of witnesses till to-morrow. Twenty Lashes were ordered by His Honor to be given Jane, slave of Wm. Wyatt, charged with stealing on
Samuel Williams (search for this): article 10
ch she possessed in the world — of they would set her free, she would "lave her children for the security." Henry, a negro boy about ten years of age, the property of Christopher Bowers, was arraigned on the charge of stealing several articles of tableware and three dresses from his owner. After hearing the evidence, and a full inspection of the negro's appearance and intelligence, the Mayor very property turned him over to his master for punishment. A negro named William, slave of West Chandler, was ordered thirty stripes for stealing a cape on Saturday night last, from Col. Jesse. Fifteen lashes each were bestowed on Albert, in the employ of the Virginia Central Railroad, and John, the property of Samuel Williams, arrested after hours without proper passes. Louisa Lankford, a white woman, was remanded in the sum of $300 security for her appearance before the Hustings Court, to answer the charge of stealing a child's hat from Randolph Woodson, a few days since.
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