hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Johnson 29 1 Browse Search
Early 25 3 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Rodes 16 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Robert E. Lee 12 0 Browse Search
R. S. Ewell 12 2 Browse Search
Isaac Jacobs 12 0 Browse Search
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
D. Scott 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 5, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 172 total hits in 52 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Millwood (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
clock Johnson's pickets became engaged with the enemy's pickets just below Winchester, and drove them in. Soon thereafter Col. R. Lumden Andrews, with Carpenter's battery, opened fire on a battery of the enemy, which they had advanced out on the Millwood road, driving it into the town, and blowing up one of their caissons. This achievement drew upon Carpenter's battery a heavy, but not well directed fire from the enemy's artillery posted in the forts and on the heights above and beyond the townof drawing the enemy's fire on the town. The rest of the division, consisting of Smith's Hays's, and Hoke's brigades, were now engaged in the execution of the flank movement. Meantime General Johnston moved a portion of his division across the Millwood road, and threw out a line of skirmishers, so as to divert attention from Early's operations. These skirmishers were commanded by Lt. Col. H. J. Williams, who was severely wounded after a conspicuous display of gallantry. With a single line of
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 9
Pennsylvania campaign of Gen. Lee. [from our own Correspondent.] Army of Northern Virginia,Jan. 30th, 1864. I had hoped when I began the review of the operations of the Army of Northern Virginia for the past year to have been able to have gone on without interruption, but a combination of circumstances, which I deem unnecessary to mention, has heretofore prevented that regularity and sequence which I had wished to have preserved. To-day I resume the narration, and will proceed so far san company was quite useful in the same way. I have thus hurriedly sketched the main facts connected with the capture of Winchester and the liberation of the Valley. It was altogether a most brilliant episode in the otherwise disastrous Pennsylvania campaign. Lieut. Gen. R. S. Ewell, by his skill, energy, and strategy, fully demonstrated his high capacity for the post to which he had then so recently been promoted; whilst Early, Rodes, and Johnson gave signal proofs of their respective f
Rappahannock (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
of circumstances, which I deem unnecessary to mention, has heretofore prevented that regularity and sequence which I had wished to have preserved. To-day I resume the narration, and will proceed so far as to include an account of The battle of Winchester. On the 9th of June Lieut. Gen. R. S. Ewell's (second) corps, being encamped near Culpeper C. H., Major-Gen. J. E. B. Stuart reported a large force of the enemy, made up of cavalry, artillery, and infantry, to have crossed the Rappahannock river, and that they were advancing to give battle. Rodes's division, being nearest to the cavalry, was ordered up to support it, if necessary, but did not become engaged. The result of that fight was a signal repulse to the enemy, though not without severe loss on our side. Inasmuch as I propose to devote a chapter to the operations of the cavalry during the past year I will not now allude further to this fight. On the afternoon of the 10th of June the whole of Ewell's corps left Cu
Shenandoah (United States) (search for this): article 9
he cavalry during the past year I will not now allude further to this fight. On the afternoon of the 10th of June the whole of Ewell's corps left Culpeper C. H., moving in the direction of Winchester, via Front Royal, in the county of Warren, and crossing the Blue Ridge at Chester Gap on the night of the 12th, the whole corps arrived at and near Front Royal, and was disposed as follows. Johnson's division bivouacked near Cedarville; Early's between the north and south forks of the Shenandoah river, at Front Royal, and Rodes's five miles beyond the river, on the road leading to Berryville. On the 13th Johnson, moving on the Front Royal road, and Early, on the Valley pike, approached Winchester. About 12 o'clock Johnson's pickets became engaged with the enemy's pickets just below Winchester, and drove them in. Soon thereafter Col. R. Lumden Andrews, with Carpenter's battery, opened fire on a battery of the enemy, which they had advanced out on the Millwood road, driving it in
Martinsburg (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
egiments of Stuart's brigade, with Carpenter's battery, and sections of Demerit's and Rame's batteries, to move to the Martinsburg road and intercept the expected retreat of the enemy; or, if they should hold their ground, to be prepared for a simul four miles off, surrendered to Gen. Johnson. At dark on the evening before we captured Winchester, Rodes entered Martinsburg. His division moved from Cedarville, near Front Royal, with the view of cutting off and capturing a force of the enemed at that place. Rodes, with Jenkins cavalry brigade, had a sharp skirmish with the enemy just before entering Martinsburg, capturing one hundred and fifty prisoners and five pieces of artillery. On the road to Martinsburg Jenkins's cavalryhe same hour Rodes entered Berryville. Early took the key of the enemy's position at Winchester just as Rodes entered Martinsburg at sunset on the 14th June, and next morning Johnson intercepted the enemy's flying columns. The 16th Virginia cav
Cedarville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
tion of Winchester, via Front Royal, in the county of Warren, and crossing the Blue Ridge at Chester Gap on the night of the 12th, the whole corps arrived at and near Front Royal, and was disposed as follows. Johnson's division bivouacked near Cedarville; Early's between the north and south forks of the Shenandoah river, at Front Royal, and Rodes's five miles beyond the river, on the road leading to Berryville. On the 13th Johnson, moving on the Front Royal road, and Early, on the Valley p, found it abandoned, and hauled down the "old flag" at daylight, just before the enemy, four miles off, surrendered to Gen. Johnson. At dark on the evening before we captured Winchester, Rodes entered Martinsburg. His division moved from Cedarville, near Front Royal, with the view of cutting off and capturing a force of the enemy at Berryville, in Clark county. The enemy, however, got information of his advance. fled to Winchester, and were among the prisoners captured at that place. R
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 9
. Just after dark heavy volleys were heard proceeding from the fort, and it is surmised that the enemy must have fired into each other. That night Gen. Ewell ordered Gen. Ed. Johnson, with the Stonewall brigade, Nichols's (now Stafford's) Louisiana brigade, two regiments of Stuart's brigade, with Carpenter's battery, and sections of Demerit's and Rame's batteries, to move to the Martinsburg road and intercept the expected retreat of the enemy; or, if they should hold their ground, to be p. The enemy had by this time divided into two columns for the purpose of endeavoring to turn both of our flanks simultaneously. Gen. Walker charged the party attempting to turn our right flank, and they surrendered. Gen. Johnson moved the two Louisiana regiments, held in reserve, against the body of the enemy attempting to pass our left flank, and captured the greater part of them.--Though Milroy and three hundred cavalry, besides some straggling infantry, made their escape, our captures here
Bunker Hill (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
lle, near Front Royal, with the view of cutting off and capturing a force of the enemy at Berryville, in Clark county. The enemy, however, got information of his advance. fled to Winchester, and were among the prisoners captured at that place. Rodes, with Jenkins cavalry brigade, had a sharp skirmish with the enemy just before entering Martinsburg, capturing one hundred and fifty prisoners and five pieces of artillery. On the road to Martinsburg Jenkins's cavalry had a fight at Bunker's Hill with a force of the enemy's infantry in loopholed houses at that place, killing and capturing seventy- five of the enemy and driving the rest from the house. After Early had thus taken Winchester, and Johnson had intercepted the enemy's retreat, Gen. Ewell dispatched the small force of cavalry which he had with him in pursuit of the enemy — and until next morning they were continually bringing in prisoners. The fruits of Johnson and Early's successes may be summed up in the followi
Chester Gap (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
t, if necessary, but did not become engaged. The result of that fight was a signal repulse to the enemy, though not without severe loss on our side. Inasmuch as I propose to devote a chapter to the operations of the cavalry during the past year I will not now allude further to this fight. On the afternoon of the 10th of June the whole of Ewell's corps left Culpeper C. H., moving in the direction of Winchester, via Front Royal, in the county of Warren, and crossing the Blue Ridge at Chester Gap on the night of the 12th, the whole corps arrived at and near Front Royal, and was disposed as follows. Johnson's division bivouacked near Cedarville; Early's between the north and south forks of the Shenandoah river, at Front Royal, and Rodes's five miles beyond the river, on the road leading to Berryville. On the 13th Johnson, moving on the Front Royal road, and Early, on the Valley pike, approached Winchester. About 12 o'clock Johnson's pickets became engaged with the enemy's pi
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
ne the whole of Ewell's corps left Culpeper C. H., moving in the direction of Winchester, via Front Royal, in the county of Warren, and crossing the Blue Ridge at Chester Gap on the night of the 12th, the whole corps arrived at and near Front Royal, and was disposed as follows. Johnson's division bivouacked near Cedarville; Early's between the north and south forks of the Shenandoah river, at FFront Royal, and Rodes's five miles beyond the river, on the road leading to Berryville. On the 13th Johnson, moving on the Front Royal road, and Early, on the Valley pike, approached Winchester.Front Royal road, and Early, on the Valley pike, approached Winchester. About 12 o'clock Johnson's pickets became engaged with the enemy's pickets just below Winchester, and drove them in. Soon thereafter Col. R. Lumden Andrews, with Carpenter's battery, opened fire on we captured Winchester, Rodes entered Martinsburg. His division moved from Cedarville, near Front Royal, with the view of cutting off and capturing a force of the enemy at Berryville, in Clark coun
1 2 3 4 5 6