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Kinston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 11
The Newbern expedition.capture of the "under Writer." [from our own Correspondent.] Kinston, N. C., Feb. 7. Just where the Trent river joins its waters with the Neuse, situated on a point of land which borders either stream, lies the little town of Newbern, a place of some note in North Carolina. Soon after the fall of Roanoke Island, on the 14th day of February, 1862, it fell into the hands of the Yankees, since which time it has been in their possession and has been the seat of somecome to us upon the night air that the shell room was reached and that the explosion had begun. Turning into the creek, we landed on the shore to care for the wounded. In the evening they were sent up to Swift Creek Village, and from thence to Kinston. Two days after the whole party arrived, except, alas! the four poor fellows left behind. To close, I will say the "Underwriter" was a large side-wheel steamer, formerly a New York ocean tug boat, but was commissioned in September, 1861.
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 11
inston, N. C., Feb. 7. Just where the Trent river joins its waters with the Neuse, situated on a point of land which borders either stream, lies the little town of Newbern, a place of some note in North Carolina. Soon after the fall of Roanoke Island, on the 14th day of February, 1862, it fell into the hands of the Yankees, since which time it has been in their possession and has been the seat of some of their most important military operations. Immediately after occupation extensive forrty arrived, except, alas! the four poor fellows left behind. To close, I will say the "Underwriter" was a large side-wheel steamer, formerly a New York ocean tug boat, but was commissioned in September, 1861. She fired the first gun at Roanoke Island; had engines at 800 horse power, the largest the Yankees have taken across Hatteras swash; mounted four guns--two large 8-inch shell guns, one 12 pound rifle, and one 12 pound howitzer.--The steamer was one of the purchases of Morgan, brother
Callao (Peru) (search for this): article 11
oarded very handsomely. The enemy had sufficient notice to arm themselves, and the boarders had to fight their way upon the decks. Worst of all were the land batteries which turned their guns upon us. In the whole history of naval warfare, cutting a steamer from under land batteries has been considered the most daring and hazardous achievement that could be accomplished. The danger and risk is so great that such attempts have been few. The feat of Lord Dundonald in cutting out the ship at Callao was considered, by all odds, the greatest act attached to his splendid naval reputation, and the readers of Maryatt will remember well his ideas upon the subject. The "Underwriter" lay under three very large forts, close beside a town filled with troops, and tied head and stern to the shore. Seeing the vessel well on fire, we turned once more up the Neuse, and pulled away from the town. A heavy storm came up, the rain poured down in torrents, wetting us to the skin, and half filling t
Raleigh (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 11
a point of woods we take a last look at the burning ship, now completely enveloped in flame, the lurid light flaming in the sky and flashing for miles across the water. Although hidden from our view, we could see by sudden flashes up the sky, and by the dull, heavy, booming sound which come to us upon the night air that the shell room was reached and that the explosion had begun. Turning into the creek, we landed on the shore to care for the wounded. In the evening they were sent up to Swift Creek Village, and from thence to Kinston. Two days after the whole party arrived, except, alas! the four poor fellows left behind. To close, I will say the "Underwriter" was a large side-wheel steamer, formerly a New York ocean tug boat, but was commissioned in September, 1861. She fired the first gun at Roanoke Island; had engines at 800 horse power, the largest the Yankees have taken across Hatteras swash; mounted four guns--two large 8-inch shell guns, one 12 pound rifle, and one 12
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 11
wbern, a place of some note in North Carolina. Soon after the fall of Roanoke Island, on the 14th day of February, 1862, it fell into the hands of the Yankees, since which time it has been in their possession and has been the seat of some of their most important military operations. Immediately after occupation extensive fortifications were erected, and the lines extended over some 20 miles of surrounding country. The regiments stationed here have been composed principally of men from Massachusetts and New York, the blackest of Abolitionists, full of schemes and plans for negro emancipation, equalization and education; negro regiments have been organized; companies of disloyal Carolinians put in service against us; the most tyrannical rule established; and both men and officers have been guilty of the greatest outrages and atrocities. For many months they have occupied the town securely, retaining undisturbed possession, scarcely dreaming of the possibility of an attack. In the r
Trent (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 11
The Newbern expedition.capture of the "under Writer." [from our own Correspondent.] Kinston, N. C., Feb. 7. Just where the Trent river joins its waters with the Neuse, situated on a point of land which borders either stream, lies the little town of Newbern, a place of some note in North Carolina. Soon after the fall of Roanoke Island, on the 14th day of February, 1862, it fell into the hands of the Yankees, since which time it has been in their possession and has been the seat of some of their most important military operations. Immediately after occupation extensive fortifications were erected, and the lines extended over some 20 miles of surrounding country. The regiments stationed here have been composed principally of men from Massachusetts and New York, the blackest of Abolitionists, full of schemes and plans for negro emancipation, equalization and education; negro regiments have been organized; companies of disloyal Carolinians put in service against us; the most t
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 11
The Newbern expedition.capture of the "under Writer." [from our own Correspondent.] Kinston, N. C., Feb. 7. Just where the Trent river joins its waters with the Neuse, situated on a point of land which borders either stream, lies the little town of Newbern, a place of some note in North Carolina. Soon after the fall of Roanoke Island, on the 14th day of February, 1862, it fell into th in an hour's time we were pulling down towards the appointed rendezvous some forty miles above Newbern. One by one the boats came in, and at midday we only awaited the arrival of our commander, Capthe sky seen through the tree- tops above. About 3 o'clock we came into the open country above Newbern, where the river widened and the shores grew low and marshy. The night was foggy and thick; soded upon an island covered with full grass and a few stunted shrubs. We were still in eight of Newbern, but the boats were hauled close in upon the bank and the men completely hidden. The firing on
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 11
The Newbern expedition.capture of the "under Writer." [from our own Correspondent.] Kinston, N. C., Feb. 7. Just where the Trent river joins its waters with the Neuse, situated on a point of land which borders either stream, lies the little town of Newbern, a place of some note in North Carolina. Soon after the fall of Roanoke Island, on the 14th day of February, 1862, it fell into the hands of the Yankees, since which time it has been in their possession and has been the seat of some of their most important military operations. Immediately after occupation extensive fortifications were erected, and the lines extended over some 20 miles of surrounding country. The regiments stationed here have been composed principally of men from Massachusetts and New York, the blackest of Abolitionists, full of schemes and plans for negro emancipation, equalization and education; negro regiments have been organized; companies of disloyal Carolinians put in service against us; the most ty
Neuse (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 11
writer," the capture of which forms the subject of my brief sketch. Undoubtedly a large majority of my readers will remember the account I wrote of Capt. Wood's previous expedition on the Rappahannock, in which he boarded the "Satellite" and "Reliance," and it will be, therefore, unnecessary for me to go over again the details of preparation and departure usual up on such boating parties. Suffice it to say, then, on the morning of Sunday, 31st January, our boats were launched in the Neuse River, and in an hour's time we were pulling down towards the appointed rendezvous some forty miles above Newbern. One by one the boats came in, and at midday we only awaited the arrival of our commander, Capt Wood. About two o'clock his boat rounded the point, and he stepped ashore into the brigandine looking bivouac we had established. Without delay the arms and ammunition were distributed, the boats made ready, everything put ship-shape for the night, and between two and three o'clock we
k by a splinter the first fire, bringing a profusion of blood from my face and nose, I could scarcely see or comprehend all the rapid movements of our little fleet; but I knew our boat was first at the side, Capt. Wood's close after, then came Lieuts. Hoge, Kerr, Porcher, Gardner, Roby, and Wilkinson, while a short distance away, slackened up to prevent running down the other boats, was Gift with his launches. Our boat once fast, Lieut. Loyall and Mr. Gill, engineer, sprang forward to lead the the commotion, and told us the shore batteries had opened fire. To spare the prisoners and wounded Capt. Wood ordered them to be put into the boats and the ship made ready for firing. But for them the shore shots would have been returned, for Lieut Hoge had opened the magazines, and had stationed the men at the guns. As the steam was down, it was found it would be impossible to take time to get it up under the heavy fire of batteries not one hundred yards away; and so, the wounded and prisone
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