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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 19, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) (search for this): article 3
he wild frenzy of excitement and turn into peaceful channels the thoughts of those who had but recently been invested with power in the United States. After a lengthy but not overdrawn recital of the cruelties which have been practiced by the enemy during the war, the committee say that, "disregarding the teachings of the approved writers on international law, and the practice and claims of his own Government in its purer days, President Lincoln has sought to convert the South into a St. Domingo, by appealing to the cupidity, lists, ambition, and ferocity of the slave." The condition of those States which have been in the complete or partial control of the enemy is referred to as furnishing the best evidences of subjugation, at which the fanaticism of the North is arriving. Upon this subject the committee say: Missouri, a magnificent empire of agricultural and mineral wealth, is to day a smoking ruin and the theatre of most revolting cruelties and barbarisms. The mini
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 3
No whispers of freedom go unpunished, and the very instincts of self preservation are outlawed. The worship of God and the rites of sepulture have been shamefully interrupted, and, in many instances the cultivation of the soil is prohibited to her own citizens. These facts are attested by many witnesses and it is but a just tribute to that noble and chivalrous people, that, amid barbarities almost unparalleled, they still maintain a proud and defiant spirit towards their enemies. In Maryland, the judiciary, made subservient to executive absolutism, furnishes no security for individual rights or personal freedom; members of the Legislature are arrested and imprisoned without process of law or assignment of cause, and the whole land groaneth under the oppressions of a merciless tyranny. In Kentucky, the ballot box has been overthrown, free speech is suppressed the most versions annoyances harass and and all the arts and appliances of an unscrupulous despotism are freely us
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 3
The address of Congress to the people of the Confederate States. In the House of Representatives on Wednesday last Mr. Corry, of Alabama, made a report from the joint committee of the two Houses appointed under a resolution to prepare an address to the people of the Confederate States. The address is quite lengthy, and opens with a review of what has been accomplished under circumstances the most adverse, and invites attention to the prospects ahead, and the duty of every citizen in this crisis.--Throughout its tone is hopeful and encouraging and its diffusion among the people must evert some influence to dispel despondency where it exists. The long series of oppressive and tyrannical acts which led to a separation of the South from the North are forcibly and truthfully set forth, and the aims and objects of the new Government clearly and intelligibly defined. In alluding to the measures which were enacted and the steps taken in the formation of the Confederacy, the com
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 3
ers on international law, and the practice and claims of his own Government in its purer days, President Lincoln has sought to convert the South into a St. Domingo, by appealing to the cupidity, lists, ambition, and ferocity of the slave." The condition of those States which have been in the complete or partial control of the enemy is referred to as furnishing the best evidences of subjugation, at which the fanaticism of the North is arriving. Upon this subject the committee say: Missouri, a magnificent empire of agricultural and mineral wealth, is to day a smoking ruin and the theatre of most revolting cruelties and barbarisms. The minions of tyranny consume her substance, plunder her citizens, and destroy her peace. The sacred rights of freemen are struck down, and the fiscal of her children, her maidens, and her old men, is made to flow, out of mere wantonness and recklessness. No whispers of freedom go unpunished, and the very instincts of self preservation are outlaw
United States (United States) (search for this): article 3
The address of Congress to the people of the Confederate States. In the House of Representatives on Wednesday last Mr. Corry, of Alabama, made a report from the joint committee of the two Houses appointed under a resolution to prepare an address to the people of the Confederate States. The address is quite lengthy, and oConfederate States. The address is quite lengthy, and opens with a review of what has been accomplished under circumstances the most adverse, and invites attention to the prospects ahead, and the duty of every citizen in this crisis.--Throughout its tone is hopeful and encouraging and its diffusion among the people must evert some influence to dispel despondency where it exists. Tections would restrain the wild frenzy of excitement and turn into peaceful channels the thoughts of those who had but recently been invested with power in the United States. After a lengthy but not overdrawn recital of the cruelties which have been practiced by the enemy during the war, the committee say that, "disregarding t
The address of Congress to the people of the Confederate States. In the House of Representatives on Wednesday last Mr. Corry, of Alabama, made a report from the joint committee of the two Houses appointed under a resolution to prepare an address to the people of the Confederate States. The address is quite lengthy, and opens with a review of what has been accomplished under circumstances the most adverse, and invites attention to the prospects ahead, and the duty of every citizen in this crisis.--Throughout its tone is hopeful and encouraging and its diffusion among the people must evert some influence to dispel despondency where it exists. The long series of oppressive and tyrannical acts which led to a separation of the South from the North are forcibly and truthfully set forth, and the aims and objects of the new Government clearly and intelligibly defined. In alluding to the measures which were enacted and the steps taken in the formation of the Confederacy, the com
obvious interests of the two sections would restrain the wild frenzy of excitement and turn into peaceful channels the thoughts of those who had but recently been invested with power in the United States. After a lengthy but not overdrawn recital of the cruelties which have been practiced by the enemy during the war, the committee say that, "disregarding the teachings of the approved writers on international law, and the practice and claims of his own Government in its purer days, President Lincoln has sought to convert the South into a St. Domingo, by appealing to the cupidity, lists, ambition, and ferocity of the slave." The condition of those States which have been in the complete or partial control of the enemy is referred to as furnishing the best evidences of subjugation, at which the fanaticism of the North is arriving. Upon this subject the committee say: Missouri, a magnificent empire of agricultural and mineral wealth, is to day a smoking ruin and the theatre