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Turquie (Turkey) (search for this): article 4
stion. He says: In conclusion, I would observe that the above considerations present us with two satisfactory results. First, that the production of cotton in other countries than the Southern States of America is steadily progressing, the imports of 1864 exceeding probably those of 1862 by one million bales, thus lessening our exclusive dependence upon one source of supply; secondly, that the three countries which have shown the most eager desire to contribute to this result--Egypt, Turkey, and Italy--possess advantages in climate and soil, and facility of access to this market, which enable them to compete successfully with the Southern States of America, not only in quality, but also in the cost of production; and I am sanguine enough to anticipate that some few years hence the coasts of the Mediterranean will furnish an annual supply of two million bales. Of India I regret I cannot take so hopeful a view. So long as high prices prevail she may furnish us with a considerabl
British cotton Prospects for 1864. --Mr. Jno, Cheatham, in a very able letter to the Manchester Examiner, enters with great fullness into the above question. He says: In conclusion, I would observe that the above considerations present us with two satisfactory results. First, that the production of cotton in other countries than the Southern States of America is steadily progressing, the imports of 1864 exceeding probably those of 1862 by one million bales, thus lessening our exclusive dependence upon one source of supply; secondly, that the three countries which have shown the most eager desire to contribute to this result--Egypt, Turkey, and Italy--possess advantages in climate and soil, and facility of access to this market, which enable them to compete successfully with the Southern States of America, not only in quality, but also in the cost of production; and I am sanguine enough to anticipate that some few years hence the coasts of the Mediterranean will furnish a
British cotton Prospects for 1864. --Mr. Jno, Cheatham, in a very able letter to the Manchester Examiner, enters with great fullness into the above question. He says: In conclusion, I would observe that the above considerations present us with two satisfactory results. First, that the production of cotton in other countries than the Southern States of America is steadily progressing, the imports of 1864 exceeding probably those of 1862 by one million bales, thus lessening our exclusive dependence upon one source of supply; secondly, that the three countries which have shown the most eager desire to contribute to this result--Egypt, Turkey, and Italy--possess advantages in climate and soil, and facility of access to this market, which enable them to compete successfully with the Southern States of America, not only in quality, but also in the cost of production; and I am sanguine enough to anticipate that some few years hence the coasts of the Mediterranean will furnish an
British cotton Prospects for 1864. --Mr. Jno, Cheatham, in a very able letter to the Manchester Examiner, enters with great fullness into the above question. He says: In conclusion, I would observe that the above considerations present us with two satisfactory results. First, that the production of cotton in other countries than the Southern States of America is steadily progressing, the imports of 1864 exceeding probably those of 1862 by one million bales, thus lessening our exclusive dependence upon one source of supply; secondly, that the three countries which have shown the most eager desire to contribute to this result--Egypt, Turkey, and Italy--possess advantages in climate and soil, and facility of access to this market, which enable them to compete successfully with the Southern States of America, not only in quality, but also in the cost of production; and I am sanguine enough to anticipate that some few years hence the coasts of the Mediterranean will furnish an
British cotton Prospects for 1864. --Mr. Jno, Cheatham, in a very able letter to the Manchester Examiner, enters with great fullness into the above question. He says: In conclusion, I would observe that the above considerations present us with two satisfactory results. First, that the production of cotton in other countries than the Southern States of America is steadily progressing, the imports of 1864 exceeding probably those of 1862 by one million bales, thus lessening our exclu1864 exceeding probably those of 1862 by one million bales, thus lessening our exclusive dependence upon one source of supply; secondly, that the three countries which have shown the most eager desire to contribute to this result--Egypt, Turkey, and Italy--possess advantages in climate and soil, and facility of access to this market, which enable them to compete successfully with the Southern States of America, not only in quality, but also in the cost of production; and I am sanguine enough to anticipate that some few years hence the coasts of the Mediterranean will furnish an