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r and make immediate report. Your committee have been furnished with a copy of that order, and the reports thereon of Col. Shields, the Commandant of the Post, and of the several officers in charge of the troops at Camp Lee, which are of interest an assured, in the administration of the laborious and responsible department, under the management of the commandant, Colonel Shields, whose high character, urbane manners, delicate feelings of humanity, and eminent qualifications for his post, forbimittee, therefore, proceeded to Camp Lee, and take pleasure in stating were received with politeness and courtesy by Colonel Shields, the commandant, and all the officers at the post. Every facility and opportunity were afforded them for examination and inquiry into the condition of the camp, and of the wants, necessities, accommodations, and comforts of the men. Col. Shields, himself, and all of his officers, frankly and with alacrity, responded to every inquiry addressed to them touching the
G. W. Lewis (search for this): article 7
rting this as the result of their inquiries. They believe that the investigation will have a good effect, and was, under the circumstances and gravity of the charges, alike due to our conscripts and the officers of the post. It will show to our people that the General Assembly are not insensible to the wants and sufferings of our noble soldiers, in whatever field or camp they are called to render service to their country; nor faithless to her solemn obligations to extend a parental care over them, and to shield and protect them whenever oppression and distress may come upon them.--It will accomplish more; it will relieve the minds of distant families and friends as to the supposed maltreatment of husbands, sons, and brothers in Camp Lee, and mitigate something of that repulsiveness and dread with which that military post is viewed by conscripts who are sent there pursuant to military regulations. G. W. Lewis, Chairman Senate Com. B. H. Magruder, Chairman House Com.
r care and attention to their wants and necessities. As far, therefore, as your committee could peruse their investigation, and it was as searching at the nature of the case, and their sources of information admitted, they could discover no instance of a death, cruelty, inhumanity, or even of extreme suffering or hardship. Hardships there undoubtedly are and have been; but only such and not more severe than are incident to camp fare and a soldier's life. We were informed by the surgeon, Dr. Palmer, of a case where a man fell in a fit; but he was known to be subject to fire and they were not produced by exposure to the cold, as the surgeons believes. It happened during the severe weather in February, and probably gave origin to the report of inhumanity at the camp, which was so widely propagated, and excited the sensibility of the General Assembly and the people. Your committee did not consider themselves limited in their inquiries to the rumor of suffering among the conscripts
orting this as the result of their inquiries. They believe that the investigation will have a good effect, and was, under the circumstances and gravity of the charges, alike due to our conscripts and the officers of the post. It will show to our people that the General Assembly are not insensible to the wants and sufferings of our noble soldiers, in whatever field or camp they are called to render service to their country; nor faithless to her solemn obligations to extend a parental care over them, and to shield and protect them whenever oppression and distress may come upon them.--It will accomplish more; it will relieve the minds of distant families and friends as to the supposed maltreatment of husbands, sons, and brothers in Camp Lee, and mitigate something of that repulsiveness and dread with which that military post is viewed by conscripts who are sent there pursuant to military regulations. G. W. Lewis, Chairman Senate Com. B. H. Magruder, Chairman House Com.
etary of War of their purpose, and to request of him authority to visit Camp Lee, in order to obtain information and to enable them more thoroughly to prosecute their enquiries. To this application the Secretary promptly and courteously replied, giving the authority asked for and expressing the pleasure he felt at the interest manifested in the conscripts by the General Assembly in the resolutions of inquiry which they had adopted and under which your committee were acting. The letter of Mr. Seddon, together with his written authority to visit Camp Lee accompanying it, your committee regard as of sufficient importance, and as due alike to the subject and the Secretary of War, to refer to and make a part of their report, and they accordingly append them, marked A and B. They think it proper to remark also in this connection, that they found the proposed investigation of the subjects committed to them had been in part anticipated by the action of the Secretary of War, before the passag
B. H. Magruder (search for this): article 7
orting this as the result of their inquiries. They believe that the investigation will have a good effect, and was, under the circumstances and gravity of the charges, alike due to our conscripts and the officers of the post. It will show to our people that the General Assembly are not insensible to the wants and sufferings of our noble soldiers, in whatever field or camp they are called to render service to their country; nor faithless to her solemn obligations to extend a parental care over them, and to shield and protect them whenever oppression and distress may come upon them.--It will accomplish more; it will relieve the minds of distant families and friends as to the supposed maltreatment of husbands, sons, and brothers in Camp Lee, and mitigate something of that repulsiveness and dread with which that military post is viewed by conscripts who are sent there pursuant to military regulations. G. W. Lewis, Chairman Senate Com. B. H. Magruder, Chairman House Com.
ese officers. It appears that the men were furnished with all the wood allowed by the army regulations. The supply was stated to be ample in ordinary weather, but during an extremely rigorous spell of cold, such as occurred about the middle of February, it was admitted that the quantity of wood was not adequate. That some discomfort was experienced by some of the conscripts for want of sufficient fire is quite probable, but we could as certain no individual case of the kind, and find nothing fe. We were informed by the surgeon, Dr. Palmer, of a case where a man fell in a fit; but he was known to be subject to fire and they were not produced by exposure to the cold, as the surgeons believes. It happened during the severe weather in February, and probably gave origin to the report of inhumanity at the camp, which was so widely propagated, and excited the sensibility of the General Assembly and the people. Your committee did not consider themselves limited in their inquiries to