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Belle Isle, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 13
y in his composition; which brighten upon acquaintance. His unexpected kindness to the footsore and weary prisoners he recaptured after their attempt to escape with the famous "one hundred and ten" last month, is very gratefully remembered. Col. Sanderson discredits the statement made by some negroes that a thousand pounds of powder have been placed in a pit under the prison to blow it up with all its inmates, in case of another attempt to rescue the prisoners. The commandant of Belle Isle Lieut. Victor Bossieux, is said to be a large-hearted man; and were the whole treatment of the prisoners to be confided to him but little cause of complaint would exist. But holding a very subordinate position, he finds himself constantly trammeled in every effort to improve or ameliorate their condition. Col. Sanderson and others of the officers and men are justly indignant at the attempt of certain returned prisoners to make "martyrs" of themselves by the publication of exaggerated
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 13
n Administration organ:) Lieut. Col. James M. Sanderson, Chief Commissary of Subsistence of the 1st army corps, utterly and flatly contradicts the statements respecting the issue of "mule ment" at the Libby, and adds that all such statements by returned prisoners and letter-writers, tend to bring us into ridicule, and interfere materially in the humane efforts sometimes made to mitigate the real evils of the case. Maj. Thos. P. Turner, the commandant of the Libby, was a cadet of West Point for two years preceding the war. He is a very young man, but has the confidence of the Confederate authorities; a strict soldier and a severe disciplinarian, but not entirely unmindful of those virtues by which an enviable reputation is to be attained. Dick Turner, however, the Inspector of the Prison, (who, by the way, is not a relative of the Major,) is of an entirely different mould, yet has some streaks of humanity in his composition; which brighten upon acquaintance. His unexpected
James M. Sanderson (search for this): article 13
n by some of our exchanged prisoners who arrived at Annapolis yesterday. We quote from a letter thence to the Times, (an Administration organ:) Lieut. Col. James M. Sanderson, Chief Commissary of Subsistence of the 1st army corps, utterly and flatly contradicts the statements respecting the issue of "mule ment" at the Libbyfootsore and weary prisoners he recaptured after their attempt to escape with the famous "one hundred and ten" last month, is very gratefully remembered. Col. Sanderson discredits the statement made by some negroes that a thousand pounds of powder have been placed in a pit under the prison to blow it up with all its inmates, nt would exist. But holding a very subordinate position, he finds himself constantly trammeled in every effort to improve or ameliorate their condition. Col. Sanderson and others of the officers and men are justly indignant at the attempt of certain returned prisoners to make "martyrs" of themselves by the publication of exa
Thomas P. Turner (search for this): article 13
is yesterday. We quote from a letter thence to the Times, (an Administration organ:) Lieut. Col. James M. Sanderson, Chief Commissary of Subsistence of the 1st army corps, utterly and flatly contradicts the statements respecting the issue of "mule ment" at the Libby, and adds that all such statements by returned prisoners and letter-writers, tend to bring us into ridicule, and interfere materially in the humane efforts sometimes made to mitigate the real evils of the case. Maj. Thos. P. Turner, the commandant of the Libby, was a cadet of West Point for two years preceding the war. He is a very young man, but has the confidence of the Confederate authorities; a strict soldier and a severe disciplinarian, but not entirely unmindful of those virtues by which an enviable reputation is to be attained. Dick Turner, however, the Inspector of the Prison, (who, by the way, is not a relative of the Major,) is of an entirely different mould, yet has some streaks of humanity in his co
Dick Turner (search for this): article 13
ers and letter-writers, tend to bring us into ridicule, and interfere materially in the humane efforts sometimes made to mitigate the real evils of the case. Maj. Thos. P. Turner, the commandant of the Libby, was a cadet of West Point for two years preceding the war. He is a very young man, but has the confidence of the Confederate authorities; a strict soldier and a severe disciplinarian, but not entirely unmindful of those virtues by which an enviable reputation is to be attained. Dick Turner, however, the Inspector of the Prison, (who, by the way, is not a relative of the Major,) is of an entirely different mould, yet has some streaks of humanity in his composition; which brighten upon acquaintance. His unexpected kindness to the footsore and weary prisoners he recaptured after their attempt to escape with the famous "one hundred and ten" last month, is very gratefully remembered. Col. Sanderson discredits the statement made by some negroes that a thousand pounds of pow
Victor Bossieux (search for this): article 13
ion; which brighten upon acquaintance. His unexpected kindness to the footsore and weary prisoners he recaptured after their attempt to escape with the famous "one hundred and ten" last month, is very gratefully remembered. Col. Sanderson discredits the statement made by some negroes that a thousand pounds of powder have been placed in a pit under the prison to blow it up with all its inmates, in case of another attempt to rescue the prisoners. The commandant of Belle Isle Lieut. Victor Bossieux, is said to be a large-hearted man; and were the whole treatment of the prisoners to be confided to him but little cause of complaint would exist. But holding a very subordinate position, he finds himself constantly trammeled in every effort to improve or ameliorate their condition. Col. Sanderson and others of the officers and men are justly indignant at the attempt of certain returned prisoners to make "martyrs" of themselves by the publication of exaggerated statements, whic