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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: April 5, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 14 total hits in 11 results.

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Robert B. Trower (search for this): article 4
day night, near the corner of Mayo and Broad street, the accused passed by and asked him the time. He took out his watch to tell them, when Moore snatched it and ran up Broad streets. Mr. John A. Foster, who witnessed the robbery, followed the rogues and pointed them out to watchman Perdue, who arrested them in Dominick's tobacco store on Broad street, above 7th street. When arrested Moore had the stolen watch in his pocket. The accused were committed for trial. Warner, slave of Robert B. Trower, was charged with having a gold watch and pencil, supposed to be stolen. Warner said he had bought the watch from an unknown soldier, and had the receipt at home. It appearing that he was going at large, the Mayor committed him, and continued the case as to the watch until to-day. Ned Hudson, a free negro, keeping a grocery and bar room on 6th street, near the Second Market, was charged with permitting an unlawful assembly of eight negroes on his premises; and Martha and Bets
ery, followed the rogues and pointed them out to watchman Perdue, who arrested them in Dominick's tobacco store on Broad street, above 7th street. When arrested Moore had the stolen watch in his pocket. The accused were committed for trial. Warner, slave of Robert B. Trower, was charged with having a gold watch and pencil, supposed to be stolen. Warner said he had bought the watch from an unknown soldier, and had the receipt at home. It appearing that he was going at large, the MayorWarner said he had bought the watch from an unknown soldier, and had the receipt at home. It appearing that he was going at large, the Mayor committed him, and continued the case as to the watch until to-day. Ned Hudson, a free negro, keeping a grocery and bar room on 6th street, near the Second Market, was charged with permitting an unlawful assembly of eight negroes on his premises; and Martha and Betsy, slaves, were charged with being in the said unlawful assembly. In the absence of witnesses for the defence, the case was continued. The case of James P. Tyler, clerk of the Second Market, charged with huckstering in the
John Kelly (search for this): article 4
Mayor's Court. --There were the usual number of "subjects," black and white, before the Mayor yesterday, but their cases were mostly of little interest. George Moore and John Kelly, sailors, were charged with stealing a silver watch from Robert, slave of John Hunter. While Robert was with his back on Saturday night, near the corner of Mayo and Broad street, the accused passed by and asked him the time. He took out his watch to tell them, when Moore snatched it and ran up Broad streets. Mr. John A. Foster, who witnessed the robbery, followed the rogues and pointed them out to watchman Perdue, who arrested them in Dominick's tobacco store on Broad street, above 7th street. When arrested Moore had the stolen watch in his pocket. The accused were committed for trial. Warner, slave of Robert B. Trower, was charged with having a gold watch and pencil, supposed to be stolen. Warner said he had bought the watch from an unknown soldier, and had the receipt at home.
Alex White (search for this): article 4
et. When arrested Moore had the stolen watch in his pocket. The accused were committed for trial. Warner, slave of Robert B. Trower, was charged with having a gold watch and pencil, supposed to be stolen. Warner said he had bought the watch from an unknown soldier, and had the receipt at home. It appearing that he was going at large, the Mayor committed him, and continued the case as to the watch until to-day. Ned Hudson, a free negro, keeping a grocery and bar room on 6th street, near the Second Market, was charged with permitting an unlawful assembly of eight negroes on his premises; and Martha and Betsy, slaves, were charged with being in the said unlawful assembly. In the absence of witnesses for the defence, the case was continued. The case of James P. Tyler, clerk of the Second Market, charged with huckstering in the said market, was continued until to-morrow. Alex White, a free negro, having a pass from Camp Lee that was out of date, was discharged.
John Hunter (search for this): article 4
Mayor's Court. --There were the usual number of "subjects," black and white, before the Mayor yesterday, but their cases were mostly of little interest. George Moore and John Kelly, sailors, were charged with stealing a silver watch from Robert, slave of John Hunter. While Robert was with his back on Saturday night, near the corner of Mayo and Broad street, the accused passed by and asked him the time. He took out his watch to tell them, when Moore snatched it and ran up Broad streets. Mr. John A. Foster, who witnessed the robbery, followed the rogues and pointed them out to watchman Perdue, who arrested them in Dominick's tobacco store on Broad street, above 7th street. When arrested Moore had the stolen watch in his pocket. The accused were committed for trial. Warner, slave of Robert B. Trower, was charged with having a gold watch and pencil, supposed to be stolen. Warner said he had bought the watch from an unknown soldier, and had the receipt at home.
Ned Hudson (search for this): article 4
them in Dominick's tobacco store on Broad street, above 7th street. When arrested Moore had the stolen watch in his pocket. The accused were committed for trial. Warner, slave of Robert B. Trower, was charged with having a gold watch and pencil, supposed to be stolen. Warner said he had bought the watch from an unknown soldier, and had the receipt at home. It appearing that he was going at large, the Mayor committed him, and continued the case as to the watch until to-day. Ned Hudson, a free negro, keeping a grocery and bar room on 6th street, near the Second Market, was charged with permitting an unlawful assembly of eight negroes on his premises; and Martha and Betsy, slaves, were charged with being in the said unlawful assembly. In the absence of witnesses for the defence, the case was continued. The case of James P. Tyler, clerk of the Second Market, charged with huckstering in the said market, was continued until to-morrow. Alex White, a free negro, hav
George Moore (search for this): article 4
yor's Court. --There were the usual number of "subjects," black and white, before the Mayor yesterday, but their cases were mostly of little interest. George Moore and John Kelly, sailors, were charged with stealing a silver watch from Robert, slave of John Hunter. While Robert was with his back on Saturday night, near the corner of Mayo and Broad street, the accused passed by and asked him the time. He took out his watch to tell them, when Moore snatched it and ran up Broad streets. Mr. John A. Foster, who witnessed the robbery, followed the rogues and pointed them out to watchman Perdue, who arrested them in Dominick's tobacco store on Broad street, above 7th street. When arrested Moore had the stolen watch in his pocket. The accused were committed for trial. Warner, slave of Robert B. Trower, was charged with having a gold watch and pencil, supposed to be stolen. Warner said he had bought the watch from an unknown soldier, and had the receipt at home. I
James P. Tyler (search for this): article 4
et. When arrested Moore had the stolen watch in his pocket. The accused were committed for trial. Warner, slave of Robert B. Trower, was charged with having a gold watch and pencil, supposed to be stolen. Warner said he had bought the watch from an unknown soldier, and had the receipt at home. It appearing that he was going at large, the Mayor committed him, and continued the case as to the watch until to-day. Ned Hudson, a free negro, keeping a grocery and bar room on 6th street, near the Second Market, was charged with permitting an unlawful assembly of eight negroes on his premises; and Martha and Betsy, slaves, were charged with being in the said unlawful assembly. In the absence of witnesses for the defence, the case was continued. The case of James P. Tyler, clerk of the Second Market, charged with huckstering in the said market, was continued until to-morrow. Alex White, a free negro, having a pass from Camp Lee that was out of date, was discharged.
ut their cases were mostly of little interest. George Moore and John Kelly, sailors, were charged with stealing a silver watch from Robert, slave of John Hunter. While Robert was with his back on Saturday night, near the corner of Mayo and Broad street, the accused passed by and asked him the time. He took out his watch to tell them, when Moore snatched it and ran up Broad streets. Mr. John A. Foster, who witnessed the robbery, followed the rogues and pointed them out to watchman Perdue, who arrested them in Dominick's tobacco store on Broad street, above 7th street. When arrested Moore had the stolen watch in his pocket. The accused were committed for trial. Warner, slave of Robert B. Trower, was charged with having a gold watch and pencil, supposed to be stolen. Warner said he had bought the watch from an unknown soldier, and had the receipt at home. It appearing that he was going at large, the Mayor committed him, and continued the case as to the watch until
little interest. George Moore and John Kelly, sailors, were charged with stealing a silver watch from Robert, slave of John Hunter. While Robert was with his back on Saturday night, near the corner of Mayo and Broad street, the accused passed by and asked him the time. He took out his watch to tell them, when Moore snatched it and ran up Broad streets. Mr. John A. Foster, who witnessed the robbery, followed the rogues and pointed them out to watchman Perdue, who arrested them in Dominick's tobacco store on Broad street, above 7th street. When arrested Moore had the stolen watch in his pocket. The accused were committed for trial. Warner, slave of Robert B. Trower, was charged with having a gold watch and pencil, supposed to be stolen. Warner said he had bought the watch from an unknown soldier, and had the receipt at home. It appearing that he was going at large, the Mayor committed him, and continued the case as to the watch until to-day. Ned Hudson, a fre
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