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Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 5
seen. From reports that reach us we have no reason to believe that Forrest has as yet removed his headquarters from Jackson. Since Forrest's late operations, much larger numbers of refugees are flocking northwards than at any previous period since the beginning of the war. The Bulletin says Gen. Steels is making a successful advance in the direction of Red river, and has no doubt he is by this time in Camden. The new State Constitution has been ratified by the people of Arkansas, in a vote of 12,370. The opposition vote was 227. The Senators repaired to their room in the State House to organize on the 12th. The number present was sixteen, one short of a quorum, but more will arrive to-morrow. Twenty- five is the whole number. All the districts had been represented in the State but two. The Representatives met in their hall. Allis is Speaker protem. Forty-two answered to their names. Three more are in town sick. It takes six more to form a quorum.
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 5
From the Trans-Mississippi Department. The Mobile Tribune publishes some items of news from the Trans- Mississippi Department, obtained from a gentleman just from New Orleans. The battle at Fort De. Russey, between Major Trogean of our forces, and Brigadier General Smith, commanding a part of Sherman's army, lasted four hours. The exact number of killed, wounded, and missing is not known, but our informant says that seven steamboats filled with wounded, composed of Connecticut, Massachusetts, renegade Louisianan, and negro regiments, were sent to Baton Rouge. Four steamboat loads of Northwestern men were sent to Cairo. General Smith, in his report, says that "the Confederate loss is very light," but that "our (the Federal) loss is very heavy, which is always the case with the assaulting party." The number of our prisoners taken was 312 privates and 26 officers, who were sent to New Orleans. All the white troops from New Orleans, Baton Rouge. Natchez, and Vicksburg, h
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 5
Confederate exchanges the latest intelligence about the progress of the war: The fight in Louisiana. The very latest Northern intelligence published about the recent fight in Louisiana is a tLouisiana is a telegram dated at Grand Ecore, La, April 11th, and is published in the New York Herald: The advance guard of Gen. Banks's army, comprising two brigades of cavalry, one of infantry and four batters have to take the oath. All negroes able to work have been sent to the leased plantations in Louisiana. Those unfit for duty are put in the negro prison at the cotton press, which caused the blackbanished from Natchez Mrs. A. L. Wilson for smuggling four pounds of powder to her husband in. Louisiana; Miss. Welst, for smuggling quinine to Louisiana; Miss. Ophelia Myers, for writing a letter sLouisiana; Miss. Ophelia Myers, for writing a letter saying that she was living under a Yankee despotism; Mrs. Calvert and daughter, for harboring her son, who was at home on furlough; and Mrs. M. E. Whitehurst, for expressing rebel sentiments. All of
Shreveport (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 5
rn files and Confederate exchanges the latest intelligence about the progress of the war: The fight in Louisiana. The very latest Northern intelligence published about the recent fight in Louisiana is a telegram dated at Grand Ecore, La, April 11th, and is published in the New York Herald: The advance guard of Gen. Banks's army, comprising two brigades of cavalry, one of infantry and four batteries, was attacked by twenty thousand rebels near Mansfield, fifty miles this side of Shreveport and fifteen miles beyond Pleasant Hill, on Friday last Compelled to yield to superior number, our forces fell back to Gen. Emory's division, of the 19th army corps, which repelled the advance of the enemy and repulsed him with great slaughter. Gen Banks deemed it prudent to fall back to Pleasant Hill, where he could choose his own position, and on Saturday, about 5 P. M, met a renewed attack of the enemy with Emory's and Smith's troops. He not only gallantly maintained his own g
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 5
Athens. The headquarters of the 2d division is at Pulaski, and the headquarters of a detachment of the 4th division is at Decatur, Ala. Brig. Gen. Dadge, of lowa, is in command. The steamers Emma and Hillman have arrived, and report Fort Pillow evacuated by the Confederates. The Emma was fired into above the fort. The direction in which the rebels with Irew is not known as yet, although it is surmised that they took a northern course from the fort; that the party which attackedted that Gen. Forrest shot one of his own men for refusing quarters to our men. Lieut Commander Thos Patterson, commanding naval station at Memphis, sent the steamer Platte Valley, with U. S steamer Sliver Cloud in tow, with ammunition to Fort Pillow. When we arrived in sight of the fort the commissary and other public buildings, with some twelve stores and private property, were in flames, and the rebels were seen moving about applying torches to the barracks, stables and huts. We t
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 5
protem. Forty-two answered to their names. Three more are in town sick. It takes six more to form a quorum. The candidates for the United States Senate are D. Butler, Q. T. Underwood, J. Helera, Issac Mills, Col. Allis, Dr. Beloatte, and W. D S. Snow, of Pine Bluff; Dr. Kirkwood and C. T. Boyton, of Lit le. Rock; Col Fishback, of Fort Smith; Dr. Gregory, of Van Buren, and A. Doseen, and others. Some of the members were captured and one is said to have been killed, on their way to Little Rock. The Fort Pillow affair. A. B. Witmore of the United States navy, writes to the Memphis Argus, the following account of the Fort Pillow fight: The combined forces of Major Gen. Forrest, Chalmers, McCulloch and Porter, numbering seven or eight thousand, made an assault on our fortifications at about six P. M, on the 12th. Our forces consisted of 250 whiltes and 350 blacks. The United States steamer New. Era, lying off the fort, shelled the rebels and drove them from the pos
Union City (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 5
nd two hundred or more bodies, mangled and dying, pleading for quarters, with distorted faces, bayonetted eyes, broken skulls,&c, I am sick and can write no more. Gen. Forrest's Capture of Paducah. A correspondent of the Mobile Advertiser writes from Forrest's expedition an account of the fight at Paducah, which is the first Southern account which has been published. He says: A portion of the force concentrated at Trento went under the command of Col Falkner (Kentuckian) to Union City, and after a brisk fight of short duration, in which Lt Col Landrum was severely wounded and one man killed, the place surrendered with some five hundred and fifty prisoners--tories, under Hawkins and Hardy. Their horses, equipments and supplies were taken. The other column, composed of Bell's Brigade and Thompson's with the exception of Faikner's regiment, under Gen. Buford pushed on with Gen. Forrest rapidly to Paducah, which place was reached about 10 o'clock on the morning of th
Hornady (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 5
est. The Memphis Bulletin, of the 13th, says a dispatch from Washington to Missouri calls for troops to be sent to the frontier as soon as possible. Gen Sherman had previously telegraphed to Nashville to send on troops, saying not a moment should be lost. The Bulletin, of the 16th, is received. The headquarters of the left wing of the 16th army corps is at Athens. The headquarters of the 2d division is at Pulaski, and the headquarters of a detachment of the 4th division is at Decatur, Ala. Brig. Gen. Dadge, of lowa, is in command. The steamers Emma and Hillman have arrived, and report Fort Pillow evacuated by the Confederates. The Emma was fired into above the fort. The direction in which the rebels with Irew is not known as yet, although it is surmised that they took a northern course from the fort; that the party which attacked the enemy, supposed to be the rear guard, kept up the bank of the river as far as could he seen. From reports that reach us
United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
ome of the members were captured and one is said to have been killed, on their way to Little Rock. The Fort Pillow affair. A. B. Witmore of the United States navy, writes to the Memphis Argus, the following account of the Fort Pillow fight: The combined forces of Major Gen. Forrest, Chalmers, McCulloch and Porter, numbering seven or eight thousand, made an assault on our fortifications at about six P. M, on the 12th. Our forces consisted of 250 whiltes and 350 blacks. The United States steamer New. Era, lying off the fort, shelled the rebels and drove them from the position which they had gained on the south side of the fort. They again assaulted our works from the north side, and owing to the timber it was impossible for the guns of the New. Erat to dislodge them, though a continual shower of shell and shrapnel was rained down on them. The garrison was so small, and the rebel force so overwhelming, the enemy gained our works about 3,30 P. M, and the gallant few
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): article 5
S. M. Wilson. From the Trans-Mississippi Department. The Mobile Tribune publishes some items of news from the Trans- Mississippi Department, obtained from a gentleman just from New Orleans. The battle at Fort De. Russey, between Major Trogean of our forces, and Brigadier General Smith, commanding a part of Sherman's army, lasted four hours. The exact number of killed, wounded, and missing is not known, but our informant says that seven steamboats filled with wounded, composed of Connecticut, Massachusetts, renegade Louisianan, and negro regiments, were sent to Baton Rouge. Four steamboat loads of Northwestern men were sent to Cairo. General Smith, in his report, says that "the Confederate loss is very light," but that "our (the Federal) loss is very heavy, which is always the case with the assaulting party." The number of our prisoners taken was 312 privates and 26 officers, who were sent to New Orleans. All the white troops from New Orleans, Baton Rouge. Natchez, an
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