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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 5
r lines, and continued his assaults until night. His last advance against Hill's front was made just before dark, and was handsomely repulsed by Wilena's and Heth's divisions. His final attack upon Ewell was made after night against that part of the line held by Edward Johnson's division. Here, too, he was beaten back, leaving many dead and wounded on the ground. During these operations Ewell captured 2,000 prisoners, nearly all of whom were taken by Gordon's Georgia brigade and Hays's Louisiana, both of whom behaved with distinguished gallantly. Longstreet had not yet reached the ground.--Leaving Gordonsville at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, he marched fifteen miles that night. The next day he marched down the Catharpin road (so called from a run which it crosses) seventeen miles, his orders being to strike Brock's road at a point south of the unfinished railroad. He halted during the afternoon within eight miles of the battle-field; but owing to the peculiar condition of
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
he woods, very naturally concluded it was a body of the enemy retiring, and opened fire upon their friends, killing eight or ten and wounding several others. Capt. Doby, of Kershaw's staff, was killed instantly, the intrepid Gen. Jenkins, of South Carolina, received a mortal wound in the head, from which he died in a few hours afterwards, and Gen. Longstreet was shot in the neck. The bail struck him in front on the right of the larynx passing under the skin, carrying away a part of the spine ochaparral prevented both sides from using artillery, only a few guns being put in position. Among all the killed, no truer or braver knight ever fell in defence of the liberties of his country than the gallant and accomplished Col. Nance, of South Carolina; and no harder fighter or more perfect gentleman ever received a wound on the field of battle than Gen. Benning, of Georgia. The one has gone to the rest of the true soldier; let us pray that the other may long be spared to the country he ha
Spotsylvania county (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
ining the district known as the "poisoned fields of Orange," and producing but little for the subsistence of either man or beast. So thick are the woods in some places that it is impossible to distinguish a man, even in the absence of venture, at a distance of fifty paces. The reader can readily imagine that it would be difficult to select more unfavorable ground for a battle between two great armies it only remains to be added that the battle was fought near the western boundary of Spotsylvania county, the line of battle being nearly at right angles to a straight line drawn from Fredericksburg through Chancellorsville to Orange Court-House. It the reader will keep these points clearly in his mind, and will place a good map before him, he will find but little difficulty in forming a satisfactory conception of the battle. As has already been stated, Ewell moved down the turnpike, which is on the left and nearest to the river, and Hill down the plank road. Stuart passed sti
Orange Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
of march, the farmer taking the plank road and the latter the turnpike, both leading from Orange Court House to Fredericksburg.--Longstreet, who was encamped in the vicinity of Gordonville, ready to s an unfinished railroad which also runs nearly parallel to the other two roads and extends from Orange C. H to Fredericksburg. The turnpike lies on the north side or next to the river, the railroad nd black jacks. It is a blasted region, adjoining the district known as the "poisoned fields of Orange," and producing but little for the subsistence of either man or beast. So thick are the woods iy at right angles to a straight line drawn from Fredericksburg through Chancellorsville to Orange Court-House. It the reader will keep these points clearly in his mind, and will place a good map thers of Kershaw's division.--Anderson's division, but lately arrived, having been left at Orange Court House to guard against any demonstration upon our rear. The flank movement was completely succe
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
will place a good map before him, he will find but little difficulty in forming a satisfactory conception of the battle. As has already been stated, Ewell moved down the turnpike, which is on the left and nearest to the river, and Hill down the plank road. Stuart passed still further to the South, and marched down the Catharpin road, so as to throw his cavalry in front of the head of Grant's army and retard its march. His troopers did their duty well, especially Rosser's brigade, of Hampton's division, and forced the Federal cavalry, which was marching up the road by which he was advancing, back into Brock's road, with considerable loss in men and horses. Indeed Grant had thrown his cavalry up the turnpike, plank road and Catharpin road, in the vain hope that he might be able to interpose a screen between himself and the Confederates, and thus both protect and conceal his movements. But Lee was not slow in penetrating his designs, and immediately sprung upon his flank like a
Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
ed yards, and between the plank road and turnpike nearly four miles. The enemy's line of battle extended along Brock's road from the unfinished railroad across the plank road to the turnpike, and was consequently about four miles in length. Chancellorsville is four miles below, on the plank road; and Fredericksburg about fifteen miles. The surrounding country is very appropriately called the Wilderness, the people being ignorant, the sail destitute of fertility, the supply of water scant, the gr a battle between two great armies it only remains to be added that the battle was fought near the western boundary of Spotsylvania county, the line of battle being nearly at right angles to a straight line drawn from Fredericksburg through Chancellorsville to Orange Court-House. It the reader will keep these points clearly in his mind, and will place a good map before him, he will find but little difficulty in forming a satisfactory conception of the battle. As has already been state
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 5
my's loss cannot be much less than 15,000, inclusive of prisoners. The unfavorable character of the ground and the thick chaparral prevented both sides from using artillery, only a few guns being put in position. Among all the killed, no truer or braver knight ever fell in defence of the liberties of his country than the gallant and accomplished Col. Nance, of South Carolina; and no harder fighter or more perfect gentleman ever received a wound on the field of battle than Gen. Benning, of Georgia. The one has gone to the rest of the true soldier; let us pray that the other may long be spared to the country he has served with so much modesty and courage. Major Gen. Wadsworth, of the Federal army, received a mortal wound in the head, and is now in one of our hospitals. Brig. Gen. Hays, of the same army, was killed. At half-past 4 o'clock Gen. Lee determined to feel of the enemy and ascertain his position on Brock's road. On the right, where I had my position, the brigades of
Brocks (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
eaven grant that Lee may not lose his left arm now, as he lost his right arm then! Gen. Longstreet had just been congratulated by Gen. Lee, Gen. Kershaw, and others, upon the complete success of his attack upon the flank of the enemy, and he was sweeping down the plank road to pluck the rich fruits of his victory, then almost within his grasp, when he was struck down by his own friends. The delay of an hour which ensued gave the enemy time to escape back behind his entrenchments on the Brocks road. The command of the corps then devolved upon Major Gen. Fields, and to-day it was turned over to Major Gen. Anderson, of Hills corps, who had been reporting to Longstreet after his arrival, and who formerly belonged to the corps. The enemy had thus been repulsed along our whole line, and left many dead and wounded in our hands. In many places his dead appeared to be five or six times as numerous as our own. Our loss was not so heavy as at first reported, and will not exceed 5,000,
Catharpin (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 5
satisfactory conception of the battle. As has already been stated, Ewell moved down the turnpike, which is on the left and nearest to the river, and Hill down the plank road. Stuart passed still further to the South, and marched down the Catharpin road, so as to throw his cavalry in front of the head of Grant's army and retard its march. His troopers did their duty well, especially Rosser's brigade, of Hampton's division, and forced the Federal cavalry, which was marching up the road by Hays's Louisiana, both of whom behaved with distinguished gallantly. Longstreet had not yet reached the ground.--Leaving Gordonsville at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, he marched fifteen miles that night. The next day he marched down the Catharpin road (so called from a run which it crosses) seventeen miles, his orders being to strike Brock's road at a point south of the unfinished railroad. He halted during the afternoon within eight miles of the battle-field; but owing to the peculiar
ushes. The enemy's loss cannot be much less than 15,000, inclusive of prisoners. The unfavorable character of the ground and the thick chaparral prevented both sides from using artillery, only a few guns being put in position. Among all the killed, no truer or braver knight ever fell in defence of the liberties of his country than the gallant and accomplished Col. Nance, of South Carolina; and no harder fighter or more perfect gentleman ever received a wound on the field of battle than Gen. Benning, of Georgia. The one has gone to the rest of the true soldier; let us pray that the other may long be spared to the country he has served with so much modesty and courage. Major Gen. Wadsworth, of the Federal army, received a mortal wound in the head, and is now in one of our hospitals. Brig. Gen. Hays, of the same army, was killed. At half-past 4 o'clock Gen. Lee determined to feel of the enemy and ascertain his position on Brock's road. On the right, where I had my position, th
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