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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 31, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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e been boarded and captured as were the Satellite and Reliance last fail by parties organizing for that purpose. From information received from citizens and others it is believed that there are still more torpedoes in the river off Tappahannock and at several other points on the river. The weather is very foggy this morning. A summary of Sheridan's raid around Richmond. A correspondent of the New York Herald gives that paper a summary of Sheridan's raid around Richmond. On the 11th he captured Ashland station, destroyed here one locomotive and a train of cars, and engine-house, and two or three government building containing a large amount of stores; also destroyed six miles of railroad, embracing three culverts, two trestle bridges, and the telegraph wire. About 7 A. M. of the 14th, he resumed the march on Richmond. He found the rebel General Stuart with his cavalry concentrated at Yellow Tavern, immediately attacked him, and after an obstinate contest gained pos
foggy this morning. A summary of Sheridan's raid around Richmond. A correspondent of the New York Herald gives that paper a summary of Sheridan's raid around Richmond. On the 11th he captured Ashland station, destroyed here one locomotive and a train of cars, and engine-house, and two or three government building containing a large amount of stores; also destroyed six miles of railroad, embracing three culverts, two trestle bridges, and the telegraph wire. About 7 A. M. of the 14th, he resumed the march on Richmond. He found the rebel General Stuart with his cavalry concentrated at Yellow Tavern, immediately attacked him, and after an obstinate contest gained possession of the Brockeitown pike, capturing two pieces of artillery, and driving his forces back towards Ashland and across the north fork of the Chickahominy. At the same time a party charged down the Brook road, and captured the first line of the enemy's works around Richmond. During the night he marched
Presidential movements in the United States--a meeting in Behalf of Lincoln. A meeting in favor of Lincoln for the next Yankee Presidency, was held at the Cooper Institute, New York, on the 18th inst. There was a glee club, and the usual electioneering accompaniments. The first speaker was the chairman, Mr. Charles S Spence. He said: The protest against the postponement of the Baltimore Convention, and to speak for the renomination to the office which he so worthily and wisely time should be lost in raising reinforcements to keep in fighting trim the regiments of the gallant Army of the Potomac. An Anniversary editorial — the results of a year. The following editorial, published in the New York News of the 18th instant, is very readable: To day completes the twelve months since the publication of the New York News was resumed, after its suppression by the Administration. It was suppressed for those attributes for which Galileo was persecuted, that is,
rant is entrenching. Since the death of that gallant cavalier, General J. F. B. Stuart, the cavalry in the Army of Northern Virginia has been apparously without a leader. We are gratified to learn that a dashing officer has been temporarily assigned to the command of these troops, who will doubtless lead them on to fresh deeds of glory. From General Johnston's Army. An official dispatch from General Joseph E Johnston confirms the account of General Cleburne's success on the 28th instant, given by the Associated Press correspondent, and published yesterday. General Johnston's dispatch is in nearly the same words as the press accounts, and it is unnecessary to repeat it. The public will be gratified at the official confirmation of this news, which is happy omen of our prospects in Northern Georgia. The Trans Mississippi Department. We understand that the orders of General Smith have been received in Richmond, fully confirming our succession of victories in the
Mr. Foote's resolution, relative to the competency of the Secretary of the Treasury, coming up as unfinished business, Mr. Foote withdrew the preamble, and the resolution was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary, by a vote of 43 ayes to 87 noes. Mr. Sexton, of Texas, introduced a joint resolution of thanks to the 9th Texas infantry, for re-enlisting for the war, which was passed unanimously. Mr. Russell, of Va., offered a resolution, rescaling the resolution fixing the 31st instant as the day of adjournment of the two Houses of Congress. Mr. A. H. Garland moved to amend by fixing Saturday next as the day of adjournment. On motion of Mr. Marshall, of Ky., the consideration of the subject was postponed for the present. Mr. Marshall then moved that the House reconsider the vote by which it refused to concur in the Senate bill doubling the amount of pay and mileage for the present session. The motion was agreed to. On motion of Mr. Marshall, the bil
ed in Castle Thunder. On his arrival at that institution he sent for an officer of the prison, and told him that he was Mr. Francis, late of Gen. Grant's army; that he unfortunately ran into our picket line at Tunstall's, and was captured; and that he expected to have the honor of remaining his guest for some time to come. The officer, as a matter of course, expressed his pleasure at having so "distinguished" a visitor. The following are the dispatches to the World. Chesterfield, May 26. The flank movement of the 6th corps, on the enemy's left, yesterday morning, was a complete success. They struck the Central Railroad about three miles above Saxton's Function, drove in the pickets and destroyed eight miles of the railroad--two miles below and two miles above Noel Station. A number of prisoners were captured, and among them a woman dressed in male attire, who states that she has been in the Army of Northern Virginia for three years, serving in a battery. The 1st
Ten dollars reward. --Ran away from the subscriber, on Saturday last, a negro fellow named Jim, 21 years of age, dark complexion, 5 feet 10 inches in height, and has the Provost Marshal's pass for ten days, dated 27th May, I will pay the above reward for his return to me at Hungary, or for his confinement in jail. A S Padget. my 31--10t*
From North Georgia. New Hope, May 29. --While Jackson's dismounted cavalry engaged the enemy last evening, our left, under Gen. Bates, was ordered to feel their position. He deployed his command as skirmishers, driving in those of the enemy, and taking possession of their breastworks. He then ordered a charge, but, ascertaining the enemy's force countermanded the order. This last order did not reach Lewis's brigade, whose gallant 2d, 4th and 5th Kentucky rushed forward with great impetuosity, leaped the breast-works, when they found themselves confronted by Logan's 15th army corps. One hundred and thirty of the regiment were killed, wounded and missing. Killed: Maj. Miller, of the 4th Kentucky, and Captain Mitchell, of the 5th Kentucky. Wounded: Capt. Desha, 5th Kentucky; Capt. Henry, Lieut. Cleveland, Lieut Forshaback, and Adjutant Moss, 2d Kentucky.
Stop the runaway. --My boy Bob ran away May 30th, in this city. He is a bright mulatto boy, about 20 years of age, rather heavy set, about 5 feet 6 inches in height, large, round face, no whiskers, full, round eyes, rather straight hair, round shouldered, and is inclined to be bow-legged. Had on when he left a gray uniform cap, blue velvet jacket, with large flat pearl buttons, white linen pants, and good shoes. I will pay liberally for his arrest and confinement in prison. Disregard all passes he may exhibit. Address me, care of F. M. Neal, box No. 1,453, Richmond, Va. J Harvey Brigham, 1st Lt, 3d La reg't. my 31--2t*
t. Mr. Reid, of Kentucky, desired to introduce a bill to allow members of Congress to draw rations, but the House refused to suspend the rule. Mr. Foster, of Ala., moved a reconsideration of the vote by which the increased compensation bill was lost. Agreed to, and the bill was referred to a special committee of one from each State. Mr. S. B. Callahan, delegate from the Creek and Seminole nations, appeared and took the oath to support the Constitution of the Confederate States. The House resumed the consideration of the resolution fixing the day of adjournment. Mr. Hartridge, of Ga., moved to amend by fixing Tuesday, the 7th of June. Agreed to — ayes 45, noes 30. The resolution of Mr. Russell, as amended, was then passed — ayes 59, noes 29. The House resolved itself into Committee of the Whole (Mr. Serton in the chair) and resumed the consideration of the bill to amend the tax laws. At 3 o'clock the House took a recess until 8 o'clock P.
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