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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 31, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
s will have crossed the Pamunkey river at Hanover Town. A large force of cavalry is in advance, accompanying the pontoon trains. This rapid succession of flank movements is destined to accomplish great results; has hitherto been quite a success, is affecting the morale of the rebel army, and must soon bring us to the outer line of the defences of Richmond. Hanover Town is about fifteen miles from Richmond, and about the same distance from the White House, the road to which place from Hanover crosses the Richmond and York River Railroad at Tunstall's Station. [This is the exact route taken by the luckless correspondent. His second dispatch is as follows:] Hanover Ford, South side of Pamunkey River.Headq'rs 1st division 6th corps,May 27th, 1864--12 Noon. By an admirably executed march General Russell has succeeded in placing the 1st Division of the 6th Corps on the south side of the Pamunkey river. Leading the column, be commenced to march at 8 P. M., and with a r
The Lincoln Glee Club then gave "Lincoln and Union" with great acceptation. Mr Isaac N Arnold, a member of Congress from Illinois, pronounced the gorilla to be the "Great Apostle of Liberty," and said: It is his mission to restore national unity, on the basis of universal liberty. He is to lead the people through this revolution and preserve the old safe guard of freedom embodied in Magna Charia and the Constitution of the United States. When he leaves the Presidential chair, in 1869, we are to be one people, one nation, and every man secured in the enjoyment of "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness." Every man equal before the law. --Every man enjoying liberty of speech, the freedom of the press, trial by jury, and the writ of habeas corpus. [Cheers.] From the day of the commencement of the public life of Mr Lincoln, his life has been consecrated to one purpose — that of freeing his country from African slavery. If slavery is, as has been said dead, then Abraham
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 1
in the United States--a meeting in Behalf of Lincoln. A meeting in favor of Lincoln for the neLincoln for the next Yankee Presidency, was held at the Cooper Institute, New York, on the 18th inst. There was a gle the Union, another term of office awaits Abraham Lincoln. [Tremendous cheering] He has had a termf the South--[great applause]--and then, with Lincoln at the head of the Government, and Grant at teers.] The Lincoln Glee Club then gave "Lincoln and Union" with great acceptation. Mr Isay of the commencement of the public life of Mr Lincoln, his life has been consecrated to one purposf slavery is, as has been said dead, then Abraham Lincoln, of a truth, has slain the monster. Thermes from the rebels at Richmond, "anybody but Lincoln, " let us reply, "nobody but Lincoln,"until lLincoln,"until liberty triumphs, and national unity is restored. "Hon" Green Clay Smith, of Ky, who seems to h a demonstration since the nomination of Abraham Lincoln for the Presidency, and he did not expect[1 more...]
Schofield (search for this): article 1
l back dead into the arms of his Assistant Adjutant General. The Yankee War Department, in response to a resolution of the Senate, has given information concerning field officers since the commencement of the war, from which it appears that in the regular Army Generals Scott, Harney, Wool, Anderson, and Ripley have retired, and Sumner, Mansfield, and Totten have died, Twiggs dismissed. Of Major Generals in the volunteer corps Blair resigned, and resignation revoked. Wm F Smith's and Schofield's appointment expired by constitutional limitation, and they were reappointed.--Horallo S Wright rejected by the Senate and since appointed, and is now in command of Sedgwick's corps. The resignations are, Cassins M Clay, Jas A Garfield, Schuyler Hamilton, Charles S Hamilton, E D Keyes, E D Morgan, Benjamin M Prentiss, and Robert M Schenck. Sixteen are dead. The "strikes" in New York continue to attract more or less attention. There is an ugly feeling manifested by the recently dis
Ripley have retired, and Sumner, Mansfield, and Totten have died, Twiggs dismissed. Of Major Generals in the volunteer corps Blair resigned, and resignation revoked. Wm F Smith's and Schofield's appointment expired by constitutional limitation, and they were reappointed.--Horallo S Wright rejected by the Senate and since appointed, and is now in command of Sedgwick's corps. The resignations are, Cassins M Clay, Jas A Garfield, Schuyler Hamilton, Charles S Hamilton, E D Keyes, E D Morgan, Benjamin M Prentiss, and Robert M Schenck. Sixteen are dead. The "strikes" in New York continue to attract more or less attention. There is an ugly feeling manifested by the recently discharged employees of the Sixth and Eighth Avenue Railroad Companies, owing to the fact that other men have been found to take their places on the old terms. The latter have been threatened with violence, and it has been found necessary to keep on every car more or less policemen to prevent these menaces from
m Gen Sedgwick, who was standing near them, was smiling at their narrowness, when a ball struck him in the forehead, the blood oozed from his nostrils, and he fell back dead into the arms of his Assistant Adjutant General. The Yankee War Department, in response to a resolution of the Senate, has given information concerning field officers since the commencement of the war, from which it appears that in the regular Army Generals Scott, Harney, Wool, Anderson, and Ripley have retired, and Sumner, Mansfield, and Totten have died, Twiggs dismissed. Of Major Generals in the volunteer corps Blair resigned, and resignation revoked. Wm F Smith's and Schofield's appointment expired by constitutional limitation, and they were reappointed.--Horallo S Wright rejected by the Senate and since appointed, and is now in command of Sedgwick's corps. The resignations are, Cassins M Clay, Jas A Garfield, Schuyler Hamilton, Charles S Hamilton, E D Keyes, E D Morgan, Benjamin M Prentiss, and Robert
Wool, Anderson, and Ripley have retired, and Sumner, Mansfield, and Totten have died, Twiggs dismissed. Of Major Generals in the volunteer corps Blair resigned, and resignation revoked. Wm F Smith's and Schofield's appointment expired by constitutional limitation, and they were reappointed.--Horallo S Wright rejected by the Senate and since appointed, and is now in command of Sedgwick's corps. The resignations are, Cassins M Clay, Jas A Garfield, Schuyler Hamilton, Charles S Hamilton, E D Keyes, E D Morgan, Benjamin M Prentiss, and Robert M Schenck. Sixteen are dead. The "strikes" in New York continue to attract more or less attention. There is an ugly feeling manifested by the recently discharged employees of the Sixth and Eighth Avenue Railroad Companies, owing to the fact that other men have been found to take their places on the old terms. The latter have been threatened with violence, and it has been found necessary to keep on every car more or less policemen to preven
The pursuit continued as far as Gaines's Mill. The enemy observing the recrossing of the Chickahominy came out from his second line of works. A brigade of infantry and a large number of dismounted cavalry attacked the divisions of Generals Gregg and Wilson, but after a severe contest were repulsed and driven behind their works. Gregg's and Wilson's divisions after collecting the wounded recrossed the Chickahominy. On the afternoon of the 12th the corps encamped at Walnut Grove Gregg's and Wilson's divisions after collecting the wounded recrossed the Chickahominy. On the afternoon of the 12th the corps encamped at Walnut Grove and Gaines's Kill. On the forenoon of the 13th (yesterday,) the march was resumed, and we encamped at Rottom Bridge. The loss of horses will not exceed one hundred. All the wounded were brought off, except about thirty cases of mortal wounds, and those were well cared for in the farmhouses of the country. The wounded will not exceed two hundred and fifty. and the total losses not over three hundred and fifty. The Virginia Central Railroad bridges over the Chickahominy, and other t
on the alert to dodge them Gen Sedgwick, who was standing near them, was smiling at their narrowness, when a ball struck him in the forehead, the blood oozed from his nostrils, and he fell back dead into the arms of his Assistant Adjutant General. The Yankee War Department, in response to a resolution of the Senate, has given information concerning field officers since the commencement of the war, from which it appears that in the regular Army Generals Scott, Harney, Wool, Anderson, and Ripley have retired, and Sumner, Mansfield, and Totten have died, Twiggs dismissed. Of Major Generals in the volunteer corps Blair resigned, and resignation revoked. Wm F Smith's and Schofield's appointment expired by constitutional limitation, and they were reappointed.--Horallo S Wright rejected by the Senate and since appointed, and is now in command of Sedgwick's corps. The resignations are, Cassins M Clay, Jas A Garfield, Schuyler Hamilton, Charles S Hamilton, E D Keyes, E D Morgan, Benjami
Presidential movements in the United States--a meeting in Behalf of Lincoln. A meeting in favor of Lincoln for the next Yankee Presidency, was held at the Cooper Institute, New York, on the 18th inst. There was a glee club, and the usual electioneering accompaniments. The first speaker was the chairman, Mr. Charles S Spence. He said: The protest against the postponement of the Baltimore Convention, and to speak for the renomination to the office which he so worthily and wisely fills--[great applause,] --of the present President of our country, this club meets here to-night. We meet at an hour of joy and triumph--[applause]--for the bugle notes of overwhelming victory are every moment being borne to us on the southern winds. The heroic military chieftain selected by the President to lead our armies has the rebellion by the throat--[applause] --and it is reeling before his terrific blows, while the Administration at Washington is sustaining him with reinforcements and
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