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foggy this morning. A summary of Sheridan's raid around Richmond. A correspondent of the New York Herald gives that paper a summary of Sheridan's raid around Richmond. On the 11th he captured Ashland station, destroyed here one locomotive and a train of cars, and engine-house, and two or three government building containing a large amount of stores; also destroyed six miles of railroad, embracing three culverts, two trestle bridges, and the telegraph wire. About 7 A. M. of the 14th, he resumed the march on Richmond. He found the rebel General Stuart with his cavalry concentrated at Yellow Tavern, immediately attacked him, and after an obstinate contest gained possession of the Brockeitown pike, capturing two pieces of artillery, and driving his forces back towards Ashland and across the north fork of the Chickahominy. At the same time a party charged down the Brook road, and captured the first line of the enemy's works around Richmond. During the night he marched
m, was smiling at their narrowness, when a ball struck him in the forehead, the blood oozed from his nostrils, and he fell back dead into the arms of his Assistant Adjutant General. The Yankee War Department, in response to a resolution of the Senate, has given information concerning field officers since the commencement of the war, from which it appears that in the regular Army Generals Scott, Harney, Wool, Anderson, and Ripley have retired, and Sumner, Mansfield, and Totten have died, Twiggs dismissed. Of Major Generals in the volunteer corps Blair resigned, and resignation revoked. Wm F Smith's and Schofield's appointment expired by constitutional limitation, and they were reappointed.--Horallo S Wright rejected by the Senate and since appointed, and is now in command of Sedgwick's corps. The resignations are, Cassins M Clay, Jas A Garfield, Schuyler Hamilton, Charles S Hamilton, E D Keyes, E D Morgan, Benjamin M Prentiss, and Robert M Schenck. Sixteen are dead. The "s
he has ruled over a divided country.--he shall rule over a united one; [applause;] he has been President of the North--he shall be President of the South--[great applause]--and then, with Lincoln at the head of the Government, and Grant at the head of the army, we will vindicate the Monroe doctrine, [cheers,] and hurl Maximilian, and the French bayonets which support him, into the sea. [Cheers.] The Lincoln Glee Club then gave "Lincoln and Union" with great acceptation. Mr Isaac N Arnold, a member of Congress from Illinois, pronounced the gorilla to be the "Great Apostle of Liberty," and said: It is his mission to restore national unity, on the basis of universal liberty. He is to lead the people through this revolution and preserve the old safe guard of freedom embodied in Magna Charia and the Constitution of the United States. When he leaves the Presidential chair, in 1869, we are to be one people, one nation, and every man secured in the enjoyment of "life, libert
caused the men to be on the alert to dodge them Gen Sedgwick, who was standing near them, was smiling at their narrowness, when a ball struck him in the forehead, the blood oozed from his nostrils, and he fell back dead into the arms of his Assistant Adjutant General. The Yankee War Department, in response to a resolution of the Senate, has given information concerning field officers since the commencement of the war, from which it appears that in the regular Army Generals Scott, Harney, Wool, Anderson, and Ripley have retired, and Sumner, Mansfield, and Totten have died, Twiggs dismissed. Of Major Generals in the volunteer corps Blair resigned, and resignation revoked. Wm F Smith's and Schofield's appointment expired by constitutional limitation, and they were reappointed.--Horallo S Wright rejected by the Senate and since appointed, and is now in command of Sedgwick's corps. The resignations are, Cassins M Clay, Jas A Garfield, Schuyler Hamilton, Charles S Hamilton, E D Keyes
The first Union gunboats ever anchored at Fredericksburg came up the Rappahannock at 4 P M yesterday, and are now lying at the wharf opposite the city. Their names are the Jacob Bell, Captain Schulze; the Yankee, Lt Hooker, and the Fuschin; Capt Street. They left the mouth of the river, where for a long time they have been on blockading duty, on Monday morning, the 16th inst, dragging for torpedoes as they proceeded. Ten were found and removed without casualties on our side, and four more not yet anchored were found and destroyed on Prowatt's Island. At this point an expedition under the command of Capt Street was sent out some distance into the country, resulting in the capture of Acting Master Burley, of the Rebel Navy, together with three men, and the killing of six, including Acting Master Maxwell, formerly of the U S Navy, with the loss on our side of one killed and three wounded. The rebels taken declared their belief that, had our gunboats been two days later they w
e been boarded and captured as were the Satellite and Reliance last fail by parties organizing for that purpose. From information received from citizens and others it is believed that there are still more torpedoes in the river off Tappahannock and at several other points on the river. The weather is very foggy this morning. A summary of Sheridan's raid around Richmond. A correspondent of the New York Herald gives that paper a summary of Sheridan's raid around Richmond. On the 11th he captured Ashland station, destroyed here one locomotive and a train of cars, and engine-house, and two or three government building containing a large amount of stores; also destroyed six miles of railroad, embracing three culverts, two trestle bridges, and the telegraph wire. About 7 A. M. of the 14th, he resumed the march on Richmond. He found the rebel General Stuart with his cavalry concentrated at Yellow Tavern, immediately attacked him, and after an obstinate contest gained pos
Presidential movements in the United States--a meeting in Behalf of Lincoln. A meeting in favor of Lincoln for the next Yankee Presidency, was held at the Cooper Institute, New York, on the 18th inst. There was a glee club, and the usual electioneering accompaniments. The first speaker was the chairman, Mr. Charles S Spence. He said: The protest against the postponement of the Baltimore Convention, and to speak for the renomination to the office which he so worthily and wisely time should be lost in raising reinforcements to keep in fighting trim the regiments of the gallant Army of the Potomac. An Anniversary editorial — the results of a year. The following editorial, published in the New York News of the 18th instant, is very readable: To day completes the twelve months since the publication of the New York News was resumed, after its suppression by the Administration. It was suppressed for those attributes for which Galileo was persecuted, that is,
Mansfield (search for this): article 1
wick, who was standing near them, was smiling at their narrowness, when a ball struck him in the forehead, the blood oozed from his nostrils, and he fell back dead into the arms of his Assistant Adjutant General. The Yankee War Department, in response to a resolution of the Senate, has given information concerning field officers since the commencement of the war, from which it appears that in the regular Army Generals Scott, Harney, Wool, Anderson, and Ripley have retired, and Sumner, Mansfield, and Totten have died, Twiggs dismissed. Of Major Generals in the volunteer corps Blair resigned, and resignation revoked. Wm F Smith's and Schofield's appointment expired by constitutional limitation, and they were reappointed.--Horallo S Wright rejected by the Senate and since appointed, and is now in command of Sedgwick's corps. The resignations are, Cassins M Clay, Jas A Garfield, Schuyler Hamilton, Charles S Hamilton, E D Keyes, E D Morgan, Benjamin M Prentiss, and Robert M Schenck
retired, and Sumner, Mansfield, and Totten have died, Twiggs dismissed. Of Major Generals in the volunteer corps Blair resigned, and resignation revoked. Wm F Smith's and Schofield's appointment expired by constitutional limitation, and they were reappointed.--Horallo S Wright rejected by the Senate and since appointed, and is now in command of Sedgwick's corps. The resignations are, Cassins M Clay, Jas A Garfield, Schuyler Hamilton, Charles S Hamilton, E D Keyes, E D Morgan, Benjamin M Prentiss, and Robert M Schenck. Sixteen are dead. The "strikes" in New York continue to attract more or less attention. There is an ugly feeling manifested by the recently discharged employees of the Sixth and Eighth Avenue Railroad Companies, owing to the fact that other men have been found to take their places on the old terms. The latter have been threatened with violence, and it has been found necessary to keep on every car more or less policemen to prevent these menaces from being carri
t direction, which caused the men to be on the alert to dodge them Gen Sedgwick, who was standing near them, was smiling at their narrowness, when a ball struck him in the forehead, the blood oozed from his nostrils, and he fell back dead into the arms of his Assistant Adjutant General. The Yankee War Department, in response to a resolution of the Senate, has given information concerning field officers since the commencement of the war, from which it appears that in the regular Army Generals Scott, Harney, Wool, Anderson, and Ripley have retired, and Sumner, Mansfield, and Totten have died, Twiggs dismissed. Of Major Generals in the volunteer corps Blair resigned, and resignation revoked. Wm F Smith's and Schofield's appointment expired by constitutional limitation, and they were reappointed.--Horallo S Wright rejected by the Senate and since appointed, and is now in command of Sedgwick's corps. The resignations are, Cassins M Clay, Jas A Garfield, Schuyler Hamilton, Charles S
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