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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 2, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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th some cannonading, constitutes the only sign of activity among the Yankees for two days past. It is reported by prisoners that Speare was wounded on Wednesday. [from our own correspondent] Petersburg, Va., July 1, 2 P. M. After Mahone had put the enemy to flight at Reams's Station, ten miles below here, on Wednesday night, Fitz Lee's cavalry division started in pursuit and pressed them until they reached Stony Creek, twenty miles below here, and ten below Reams's Station. Herses have been marvelously small — next, indeed, to nothing. We have taken not less than six hundred good serviceable horses among our captures. Thus endeth Wilson's raid, and his contempt for our cavalry has doubtless heightened his respect for Mahone's infantry. Yesterday evening, about 5 o'clock, a fight occurred near battery five, on the City Point road, on Hare's farm. The enemy made two feeble assaults on Colquitt's Georgia brigade, both of which, however, were quickly and easily re
iding parties. Another officer, in reply to a question, stated that Grant's army, when it crossed the Rapidan, numbered something over 149,000 men. Many thousands of these now lie on the soil of Spotsylvania and Cold Harbor, and the future will tell a similar story of the reinforced remnant at present in Prince George. Mysterious movement of the enemy. A citizen of Matthews county, who has arrived in Richmond, reports that before he left he saw an immense number of transports passing up Chesapeake Bay, heavily laden with troops. It is conjectured that this may be a movement of Burnside's corps on the way to reinforce Sherman in Georgia, or possibly to make an attack upon some undefended point. From Deep Bottom. The enemy, with about one brigade, still hold a position at Deep Bottom, on the north side of James river, under cover of their gunboats. It is reported that the Yankees are removing the obstructions which they recently sunk in the river below that point.
h Southampton up into Prince George, which is a distance of some sixty miles.--The woods and roads are said to be full of the enemy, who are scattered in every direction, and are constantly being brought in. In addition to the captures previously reported, I have the gratification of informing you that we captured two more pieces of artillery, nine more wagons, more ambulances — how many is not known. The wagons include the headquarter and private wagons of Gen. Wilson, and also of Gen. McIntosh, one of his brigade commanders. Our captures also include a number of prisoners, probably one hundred more, and a number of small arms. The enemy's loss, as we know, is very great, for we have at least three hundred of their well, and one hundred and twenty of their wounded as prisoners, besides the booty. Among the prisoners just brought in is Col Cook, of the 26th N Y, and another Colonel, whose name I do not know. Our losses have been marvelously small — next, indeed, to nothing.
y have been made to pay dearly for their success in this respect. The firing heard in Petersburg on Thursday evening was occasioned by a feeble assault of the enemy upon Colquitt's command, and a demonstration in Gracle's front, both of which were easily repulsed. This, with some cannonading, constitutes the only sign of activity among the Yankees for two days past. It is reported by prisoners that Speare was wounded on Wednesday. [from our own correspondent] Petersburg, Va., July 1, 2 P. M. After Mahone had put the enemy to flight at Reams's Station, ten miles below here, on Wednesday night, Fitz Lee's cavalry division started in pursuit and pressed them until they reached Stony Creek, twenty miles below here, and ten below Reams's Station. Here the enemy concluded to make a stand and rest. This, however, they were not permitted to do. General Lee brought up one of their Napoleons, which he had captured from them on Wednesday evening, and opened upon them. Aft
ooty. Among the prisoners just brought in is Col Cook, of the 26th N Y, and another Colonel, whose name I do not know. Our losses have been marvelously small — next, indeed, to nothing. We have taken not less than six hundred good serviceable horses among our captures. Thus endeth Wilson's raid, and his contempt for our cavalry has doubtless heightened his respect for Mahone's infantry. Yesterday evening, about 5 o'clock, a fight occurred near battery five, on the City Point road, on Hare's farm. The enemy made two feeble assaults on Colquitt's Georgia brigade, both of which, however, were quickly and easily repulsed. They also advanced on Gracle's front, driving in his skirmishers, but as soon as our line of battle opened upon them they fell flat on the ground, and the volley of our men having been delivered they hastily returned to their entrenchments. Our loss was almost nothing. Theirs was quite respectable. Last night our and picket lines, which for a while had been
ons, more ambulances — how many is not known. The wagons include the headquarter and private wagons of Gen. Wilson, and also of Gen. McIntosh, one of his brigade commanders. Our captures also include a number of prisoners, probably one hundred more, and a number of small arms. The enemy's loss, as we know, is very great, for we have at least three hundred of their well, and one hundred and twenty of their wounded as prisoners, besides the booty. Among the prisoners just brought in is Col Cook, of the 26th N Y, and another Colonel, whose name I do not know. Our losses have been marvelously small — next, indeed, to nothing. We have taken not less than six hundred good serviceable horses among our captures. Thus endeth Wilson's raid, and his contempt for our cavalry has doubtless heightened his respect for Mahone's infantry. Yesterday evening, about 5 o'clock, a fight occurred near battery five, on the City Point road, on Hare's farm. The enemy made two feeble assaults on Co
om all causes, is very small. After the enemy left Reams's Station they retreated to Stony Creek, where they made a feeble stand, but were soon dislodged by Fitz Lee's cavalry. After this their retreat became a rout, but a majority of them succeeded in reaching Jarratt's Station, and are believed to have rejoined the main arwn correspondent] Petersburg, Va., July 1, 2 P. M. After Mahone had put the enemy to flight at Reams's Station, ten miles below here, on Wednesday night, Fitz Lee's cavalry division started in pursuit and pressed them until they reached Stony Creek, twenty miles below here, and ten below Reams's Station. Here the enemy concluded to make a stand and rest. This, however, they were not permitted to do. General Lee brought up one of their Napoleons, which he had captured from them on Wednesday evening, and opened upon them. After short firing and a charge on the part of our men, the enemy commenced to give back rapidly. Our cavalry again began to pr
ding parties. Another officer, in reply to a question, stated that Grant's army, when it crossed the Rapidan, numbered something over 149,000 men. Many thousands of these now lie on the soil of Spotsylvania and Cold Harbor, and the future will tell a similar story of the reinforced remnant at present in Prince George. Mysterious movement of the enemy. A citizen of Matthews county, who has arrived in Richmond, reports that before he left he saw an immense number of transports passing up Chesapeake Bay, heavily laden with troops. It is conjectured that this may be a movement of Burnside's corps on the way to reinforce Sherman in Georgia, or possibly to make an attack upon some undefended point. From Deep Bottom. The enemy, with about one brigade, still hold a position at Deep Bottom, on the north side of James river, under cover of their gunboats. It is reported that the Yankees are removing the obstructions which they recently sunk in the river below that point.
ivate property, and inflicting some damage upon their railroads; but they have been made to pay dearly for their success in this respect. The firing heard in Petersburg on Thursday evening was occasioned by a feeble assault of the enemy upon Colquitt's command, and a demonstration in Gracle's front, both of which were easily repulsed. This, with some cannonading, constitutes the only sign of activity among the Yankees for two days past. It is reported by prisoners that Speare was wound his contempt for our cavalry has doubtless heightened his respect for Mahone's infantry. Yesterday evening, about 5 o'clock, a fight occurred near battery five, on the City Point road, on Hare's farm. The enemy made two feeble assaults on Colquitt's Georgia brigade, both of which, however, were quickly and easily repulsed. They also advanced on Gracle's front, driving in his skirmishers, but as soon as our line of battle opened upon them they fell flat on the ground, and the volley of ou
the Yankees had made another lodgment on the Weldon road, about eight miles below here. A reconnaissance in that direction this morning revealed the fact that, though they had been there, they had concluded not to tarry. Over a thousand broken down horses have been shot by the raiders on their return, in order to prevent their falling into the hands of our people and being recuperated. At this writing all is comparatively quiet. X. Escaped from the raiders. Capt Jas J Waggoner, of this city, was captured by Wilson's raiders in Lunenburg county, on Friday of last week, and held a prisoner until the following Wednesday, when he succeeded in making his escape, and arrived in Richmond last evening. He endeavored to avoid the raiders by secreting himself in the woods, but a negro guided them to his place of concealment, when they not only captured him, but broke open and rifled his trunks. He was present at the fight at Staunton river bridge, and represents that the
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