hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Abraham Lincoln 20 0 Browse Search
John P. Sledd 18 0 Browse Search
Gen Sherman 18 0 Browse Search
Grant 16 0 Browse Search
Cleburne 14 0 Browse Search
John W. Johnston 12 0 Browse Search
Cheatham 12 0 Browse Search
Gen Loring 10 0 Browse Search
Seward 10 0 Browse Search
Hunter 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 5, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 23 total hits in 14 results.

1 2
Little Rock (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 3
Advertiser, has an interesting letter from Houston, Texas, from which we make some extracts: All quiet in the Trans-Mississippi once more.--The rebellion is yet rampant here, and nobody left to crush it. Banks and Steele have gone, and left us with nobody to fight. We shall not be , however. The spirit of our Generals is aggressive. They are already looking out for new fields in which to exercise their After the battle of Saline Bottom, April 30th, Steele fell back to Little Rock, and the of Blount's old army went off in the direction of Fort Smith. What became of this latter we do not know. Shelby went, however, in pursuit of it; but his pursuit evidently has been diverted and probably turned into a raid. On the 17th inst he captured Dardaneville, Arkansas, and paroling the garrison, crossed the river and went on towards we know not whither. You will doubtless, however, have heard from him through Yankee channels before this reaches you. Gen Magruder re
Harrisburg (Texas, United States) (search for this): article 3
From the Trans-Mississippi. The Mobile Advertiser, has an interesting letter from Houston, Texas, from which we make some extracts: All quiet in the Trans-Mississippi once more.--The rebellion is yet rampant here, and nobody left to crush it. Banks and Steele have gone, and left us with nobody to fight. We shall not be , however. The spirit of our Generals is aggressive. They are already looking out for new fields in which to exercise their After the battle of Saline Bottom, April 30th, Steele fell back to Little Rock, and the of Blount's old army went off in the direction of Fort Smith. What became of this latter we do not know. Shelby went, however, in pursuit of it; but his pursuit evidently has been diverted and probably turned into a raid. On the 17th inst he captured Dardaneville, Arkansas, and paroling the garrison, crossed the river and went on towards we know not whither. You will doubtless, however, have heard from him through Yankee channels be
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 3
went, however, in pursuit of it; but his pursuit evidently has been diverted and probably turned into a raid. On the 17th inst he captured Dardaneville, Arkansas, and paroling the garrison, crossed the river and went on towards we know not whither. You will doubtless, however, have heard from him through Yankee channels before this reaches you. Gen Magruder reached Arkansas too late to participate in any of the batties of the late campaign returned to this point last week. From Louisiana we learn that nearly the entire State west of the Mississippi is cleared of Yankees. Our rangers have been charging up and down the country, and as they approach the Yankees leave as though they were sent for. It the Federal troops are kept busy on the other side of the river so as to prevent their reinforcing in this department, we will soon clean them out here. The Texas Legislature was convened by Gov Murrah on the 9th inst. The Governor, in his message, appears to regard the acti
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 3
d the of Blount's old army went off in the direction of Fort Smith. What became of this latter we do not know. Shelby went, however, in pursuit of it; but his pursuit evidently has been diverted and probably turned into a raid. On the 17th inst he captured Dardaneville, Arkansas, and paroling the garrison, crossed the river and went on towards we know not whither. You will doubtless, however, have heard from him through Yankee channels before this reaches you. Gen Magruder reached Arkansas too late to participate in any of the batties of the late campaign returned to this point last week. From Louisiana we learn that nearly the entire State west of the Mississippi is cleared of Yankees. Our rangers have been charging up and down the country, and as they approach the Yankees leave as though they were sent for. It the Federal troops are kept busy on the other side of the river so as to prevent their reinforcing in this department, we will soon clean them out here. Th
ississippi. The Mobile Advertiser, has an interesting letter from Houston, Texas, from which we make some extracts: All quiet in the Trans-Mississippi once more.--The rebellion is yet rampant here, and nobody left to crush it. Banks and Steele have gone, and left us with nobody to fight. We shall not be , however. The spirit of our Generals is aggressive. They are already looking out for new fields in which to exercise their After the battle of Saline Bottom, April 30th, Steele fell back to Little Rock, and the of Blount's old army went off in the direction of Fort Smith. What became of this latter we do not know. Shelby went, however, in pursuit of it; but his pursuit evidently has been diverted and probably turned into a raid. On the 17th inst he captured Dardaneville, Arkansas, and paroling the garrison, crossed the river and went on towards we know not whither. You will doubtless, however, have heard from him through Yankee channels before this reaches
teresting letter from Houston, Texas, from which we make some extracts: All quiet in the Trans-Mississippi once more.--The rebellion is yet rampant here, and nobody left to crush it. Banks and Steele have gone, and left us with nobody to fight. We shall not be , however. The spirit of our Generals is aggressive. They are already looking out for new fields in which to exercise their After the battle of Saline Bottom, April 30th, Steele fell back to Little Rock, and the of Blount's old army went off in the direction of Fort Smith. What became of this latter we do not know. Shelby went, however, in pursuit of it; but his pursuit evidently has been diverted and probably turned into a raid. On the 17th inst he captured Dardaneville, Arkansas, and paroling the garrison, crossed the river and went on towards we know not whither. You will doubtless, however, have heard from him through Yankee channels before this reaches you. Gen Magruder reached Arkansas too late
batties of the late campaign returned to this point last week. From Louisiana we learn that nearly the entire State west of the Mississippi is cleared of Yankees. Our rangers have been charging up and down the country, and as they approach the Yankees leave as though they were sent for. It the Federal troops are kept busy on the other side of the river so as to prevent their reinforcing in this department, we will soon clean them out here. The Texas Legislature was convened by Gov Murrah on the 9th inst. The Governor, in his message, appears to regard the action of Congress on the currency as little short of repudiation. "They created," says he, "and they destroyed I have no comments to make, " He urges the building up by the State of manufactures within her limits. He urges the enforcement of the laws against crime, etc. The Legislature has as yet done nothing of public importance. The condition of the currency in this department is becoming rapidly such as to force t
From the Trans-Mississippi. The Mobile Advertiser, has an interesting letter from Houston, Texas, from which we make some extracts: All quiet in the Trans-Mississippi once more.--The rebellion is yet rampant here, and nobody left to crush it. Banks and Steele have gone, and left us with nobody to fight. We shall not be , however. The spirit of our Generals is aggressive. They are already looking out for new fields in which to exercise their After the battle of Saline Bottom, April 30th, Steele fell back to Little Rock, and the of Blount's old army went off in the direction of Fort Smith. What became of this latter we do not know. Shelby went, however, in pursuit of it; but his pursuit evidently has been diverted and probably turned into a raid. On the 17th inst he captured Dardaneville, Arkansas, and paroling the garrison, crossed the river and went on towards we know not whither. You will doubtless, however, have heard from him through Yankee channels b
sissippi once more.--The rebellion is yet rampant here, and nobody left to crush it. Banks and Steele have gone, and left us with nobody to fight. We shall not be , however. The spirit of our Generals is aggressive. They are already looking out for new fields in which to exercise their After the battle of Saline Bottom, April 30th, Steele fell back to Little Rock, and the of Blount's old army went off in the direction of Fort Smith. What became of this latter we do not know. Shelby went, however, in pursuit of it; but his pursuit evidently has been diverted and probably turned into a raid. On the 17th inst he captured Dardaneville, Arkansas, and paroling the garrison, crossed the river and went on towards we know not whither. You will doubtless, however, have heard from him through Yankee channels before this reaches you. Gen Magruder reached Arkansas too late to participate in any of the batties of the late campaign returned to this point last week. From L
Gen Magruder (search for this): article 3
to Little Rock, and the of Blount's old army went off in the direction of Fort Smith. What became of this latter we do not know. Shelby went, however, in pursuit of it; but his pursuit evidently has been diverted and probably turned into a raid. On the 17th inst he captured Dardaneville, Arkansas, and paroling the garrison, crossed the river and went on towards we know not whither. You will doubtless, however, have heard from him through Yankee channels before this reaches you. Gen Magruder reached Arkansas too late to participate in any of the batties of the late campaign returned to this point last week. From Louisiana we learn that nearly the entire State west of the Mississippi is cleared of Yankees. Our rangers have been charging up and down the country, and as they approach the Yankees leave as though they were sent for. It the Federal troops are kept busy on the other side of the river so as to prevent their reinforcing in this department, we will soon clean the
1 2