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Stono River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
missiles upon it since Sunday Nothing worthy of note occurred on James's Island on Wednesday. On the morning of that day a fight took place on John's Island, that was conducted on our part by the Marion Artillery and a portion of Col. Harrison's regiment. The enemy was severely punished. Thursday afternoon the enemy on John's Island assaulted our lines with spirit three several times, but he was buried back with heavy loss. Through the whole of Friday the monitors and mortar boats in Stono threw shot and shell at Battery Pringle, that fort replying with marked effect from its Brooke gun. Saturday was ushered in by the roll of musketry and the deeper sound of light artillery, betokening a severe fight at John's Island. The result of that battle was a decisive and glorious victory. The soon of Sunday witnessed the monitors and other war craft in their former positions in our outer harbor, the enemy the night before having retired from John's Island. A short time afte
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
d city; " The first demonstration made by the enemy occurred on the night of the first July, at which time a large force of the enemy, commanded by Col. Heiner, of the 103d New York regiment, crossed from Dixon's Island to the peninsula of James Island, at Legare's farm. The next morning a fight took place between that body of the enemy and our picket guard, composed of Blake's 1st S. C. Artillery and a detachment of the Palmetto Siege Train. After having been repulsed several times, with les and cannon, the gunboats hammered away furiously on Battery Pringle, but their shot and shell did but is firing damage to that stronghold, though they had been raining their missiles upon it since Sunday Nothing worthy of note occurred on James's Island on Wednesday. On the morning of that day a fight took place on John's Island, that was conducted on our part by the Marion Artillery and a portion of Col. Harrison's regiment. The enemy was severely punished. Thursday afternoon the ene
John's Island, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
fall back, with the loss of two guns. On Saturday they landed a column on John's Island. At the dawn of Sunday the active foe attempted to get possession of Foceeding tide. On the same day, about 9 o'clock, the force at White Point, John's Island, made a timid assault on Gen. Robertson's lines, but were driven back with es's Island on Wednesday. On the morning of that day a fight took place on John's Island, that was conducted on our part by the Marion Artillery and a portion of Coent. The enemy was severely punished. Thursday afternoon the enemy on John's Island assaulted our lines with spirit three several times, but he was buried backketry and the deeper sound of light artillery, betokening a severe fight at John's Island. The result of that battle was a decisive and glorious victory. The soon sitions in our outer harbor, the enemy the night before having retired from John's Island. A short time after nightfall the persistent foe made another attempt
Robertson (search for this): article 2
mbering about one thousand, in twenty-eight barges, under Col. Hoge, 53d Pennsylvania regiment, made a determined attack on that work. They sustained a bloody repulse at the hands of the brave men under command of Lieut Col. Jos. A. Yates. That engagement left 140 prisoners and five barges in our hands, together with a large number of dead, whose fate was revealed by the proceeding tide. On the same day, about 9 o'clock, the force at White Point, John's Island, made a timid assault on Gen. Robertson's lines, but were driven back with ease. The enemy contented himself on Monday with feeble demonstrations upon our lines, which were quickly checked. On Tuesday his forces were again drawn up in two lines of battle, but he did not venture to provoke a combat. While there on the land refrained from using their rifles and cannon, the gunboats hammered away furiously on Battery Pringle, but their shot and shell did but is firing damage to that stronghold, though they had been raining
Joseph A. Yates (search for this): article 2
y the aid of greatly superior numbers, in foregoing our feeble line to fall back, with the loss of two guns. On Saturday they landed a column on John's Island. At the dawn of Sunday the active foe attempted to get possession of Fort Johnson. A picked body of men, numbering about one thousand, in twenty-eight barges, under Col. Hoge, 53d Pennsylvania regiment, made a determined attack on that work. They sustained a bloody repulse at the hands of the brave men under command of Lieut Col. Jos. A. Yates. That engagement left 140 prisoners and five barges in our hands, together with a large number of dead, whose fate was revealed by the proceeding tide. On the same day, about 9 o'clock, the force at White Point, John's Island, made a timid assault on Gen. Robertson's lines, but were driven back with ease. The enemy contented himself on Monday with feeble demonstrations upon our lines, which were quickly checked. On Tuesday his forces were again drawn up in two lines of battle
osed of Blake's 1st S. C. Artillery and a detachment of the Palmetto Siege Train. After having been repulsed several times, with heavy loss, the enemy succeeded, by the aid of greatly superior numbers, in foregoing our feeble line to fall back, with the loss of two guns. On Saturday they landed a column on John's Island. At the dawn of Sunday the active foe attempted to get possession of Fort Johnson. A picked body of men, numbering about one thousand, in twenty-eight barges, under Col. Hoge, 53d Pennsylvania regiment, made a determined attack on that work. They sustained a bloody repulse at the hands of the brave men under command of Lieut Col. Jos. A. Yates. That engagement left 140 prisoners and five barges in our hands, together with a large number of dead, whose fate was revealed by the proceeding tide. On the same day, about 9 o'clock, the force at White Point, John's Island, made a timid assault on Gen. Robertson's lines, but were driven back with ease. The enemy
, which gives a clear idea of the character of the feeble and ineffective attempts of the Yankees to capture the "doomed city; " The first demonstration made by the enemy occurred on the night of the first July, at which time a large force of the enemy, commanded by Col. Heiner, of the 103d New York regiment, crossed from Dixon's Island to the peninsula of James Island, at Legare's farm. The next morning a fight took place between that body of the enemy and our picket guard, composed of Blake's 1st S. C. Artillery and a detachment of the Palmetto Siege Train. After having been repulsed several times, with heavy loss, the enemy succeeded, by the aid of greatly superior numbers, in foregoing our feeble line to fall back, with the loss of two guns. On Saturday they landed a column on John's Island. At the dawn of Sunday the active foe attempted to get possession of Fort Johnson. A picked body of men, numbering about one thousand, in twenty-eight barges, under Col. Hoge, 53d
venture to provoke a combat. While there on the land refrained from using their rifles and cannon, the gunboats hammered away furiously on Battery Pringle, but their shot and shell did but is firing damage to that stronghold, though they had been raining their missiles upon it since Sunday Nothing worthy of note occurred on James's Island on Wednesday. On the morning of that day a fight took place on John's Island, that was conducted on our part by the Marion Artillery and a portion of Col. Harrison's regiment. The enemy was severely punished. Thursday afternoon the enemy on John's Island assaulted our lines with spirit three several times, but he was buried back with heavy loss. Through the whole of Friday the monitors and mortar boats in Stono threw shot and shell at Battery Pringle, that fort replying with marked effect from its Brooke gun. Saturday was ushered in by the roll of musketry and the deeper sound of light artillery, betokening a severe fight at John's Isla
emy on that city. A copy of the Courier, however, which we have received, gives a summary of the recent events there, which gives a clear idea of the character of the feeble and ineffective attempts of the Yankees to capture the "doomed city; " The first demonstration made by the enemy occurred on the night of the first July, at which time a large force of the enemy, commanded by Col. Heiner, of the 103d New York regiment, crossed from Dixon's Island to the peninsula of James Island, at Legare's farm. The next morning a fight took place between that body of the enemy and our picket guard, composed of Blake's 1st S. C. Artillery and a detachment of the Palmetto Siege Train. After having been repulsed several times, with heavy loss, the enemy succeeded, by the aid of greatly superior numbers, in foregoing our feeble line to fall back, with the loss of two guns. On Saturday they landed a column on John's Island. At the dawn of Sunday the active foe attempted to get possession
eived with regularity, and we have been unable to give detailed accounts of the recent movements of the enemy on that city. A copy of the Courier, however, which we have received, gives a summary of the recent events there, which gives a clear idea of the character of the feeble and ineffective attempts of the Yankees to capture the "doomed city; " The first demonstration made by the enemy occurred on the night of the first July, at which time a large force of the enemy, commanded by Col. Heiner, of the 103d New York regiment, crossed from Dixon's Island to the peninsula of James Island, at Legare's farm. The next morning a fight took place between that body of the enemy and our picket guard, composed of Blake's 1st S. C. Artillery and a detachment of the Palmetto Siege Train. After having been repulsed several times, with heavy loss, the enemy succeeded, by the aid of greatly superior numbers, in foregoing our feeble line to fall back, with the loss of two guns. On Saturday t
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