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King William County (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 11
sked the member who had informed him that Mr. J. J. Green was living in Henrico, and he replied that it was Capt. Pleasants. "But, Mr. President, how did this trivial matter reach the ears of the Mayor?--Who was the any, the informer, the intermeddler in affairs of other people? Who was it that made a mountain of this molehill? It was done by one little Mr. John J. Green, of New Kent; and who is John J. Green?" Mr. Hill stated that Mr. Green was the son of S. P. Green, of King William county, who was a Justice of the Peace in the county for years, and whose eldest son is now the presiding Justice in that county. He had married a Miss. Williams, of New Kent, whose father is a refugee here, and who has two uncles — Wilson Williams and Jas. Williams — who are both worthy and respectable citizens of Richmond. As to his being a spy or informer, or intermeddler in other people's matters, he was only doing his duty as policeman to report to the Mayor all violations of law and
Henrico (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 11
Walker's informant was mistaken. Mr. Hill asked the member who had informed him that Mr. J. J. Green was living in Henrico, and he replied that it was Capt. Pleasants. "But, Mr. President, how did this trivial matter reach the ears of thef money for that purpose, and he could have employed Mr. Green, or any one else. "This man resides in the county of Henrico, and is, therefore, by one of our ordinances, inelligible for watchman. He called the attention of the honorable chairmalso Mr. Peachy R. Grattan who served as a member of the Council for 6 or 8 months after he had removed to the county of Henrico; also Mr. Wm Taylor who served as a magistrate for several months and was re-elected while residing in the county, and whose seat was contested, but the Council gave him his seat although living in Henrico. Mr. Hill does not know in what school of ethics the member from Madison Ward was brought up when he stated that Mr. Green's violation of ordinance in living
Cadmus C. Johnson (search for this): article 11
minate, and the Council to elect one officer. Mr. Granger was recommended at the same time, received no vote, but has since been elected to fill a vacancy. "What dirty work John J. Green does for the Mayor, besides acting as spy, he knew not. The only service he performs, that he was aware of, for the Commonwealth, was to make out the Mayor's papers — a service which from time immemorial, has been performed by one of the day police. John Pearce performed it for years. After him Cadmus C. Johnson, and after him A. D. Quarles, up to the time of his death. Each of them performed the duties without receiving additional pay. Any one of the day police could perform the work now, as the Mayor keeps them all in daily attendance upon his court, whether they have business there or not. But when the Council refused to make a day officer of Green, the Mayor made this place and put him into it, in the face of the vote against him. If the Mayor must have a clerk, why did he not take one of
aps partook of refreshments with the party, and did not then think the act a grave offence?" The member replied he alluded to Mr. Hill, and he got his information from Mr. Wm. J Brown. Mr. Hill stated he was on the Square till half-past 2 o'clock, but denied that he ever saw any card-playing on the Square, and of course could not have expressed any such opinion, and did not know anything about the card-playing until he heard it, in Court on the trial of Capt. Pleasants, and that Mr. Walker's informant was mistaken. Mr. Hill asked the member who had informed him that Mr. J. J. Green was living in Henrico, and he replied that it was Capt. Pleasants. "But, Mr. President, how did this trivial matter reach the ears of the Mayor?--Who was the any, the informer, the intermeddler in affairs of other people? Who was it that made a mountain of this molehill? It was done by one little Mr. John J. Green, of New Kent; and who is John J. Green?" Mr. Hill stated that Mr.
S. P. Green (search for this): article 11
ken. Mr. Hill asked the member who had informed him that Mr. J. J. Green was living in Henrico, and he replied that it was Capt. Pleasants. "But, Mr. President, how did this trivial matter reach the ears of the Mayor?--Who was the any, the informer, the intermeddler in affairs of other people? Who was it that made a mountain of this molehill? It was done by one little Mr. John J. Green, of New Kent; and who is John J. Green?" Mr. Hill stated that Mr. Green was the son of S. P. Green, of King William county, who was a Justice of the Peace in the county for years, and whose eldest son is now the presiding Justice in that county. He had married a Miss. Williams, of New Kent, whose father is a refugee here, and who has two uncles — Wilson Williams and Jas. Williams — who are both worthy and respectable citizens of Richmond. As to his being a spy or informer, or intermeddler in other people's matters, he was only doing his duty as policeman to report to the Mayor all v
John J. Green (search for this): article 11
him, (Mr. H,) the Mayor of the city, and Mr. J. J. Green, and he (Mr. Hill) had no doubt the membeked the member who had informed him that Mr. J. J. Green was living in Henrico, and he replied thaMr. John J. Green, of New Kent; and who is John J. Green?" Mr. Hill stated that Mr. Green was uncil, the Mayor, being determined to keep John J. Green out of the army, put his name upon the roltide transaction, the member asserted that John J. Green had never performed the duties of watchmand to fill a vacancy. "What dirty work John J. Green does for the Mayor, besides acting as spy,n the Council refused to make a day officer of Green, the Mayor made this place and put him into itecause he knew the Council would not elect John J. Green; and he must, therefore, to keep this man the Council, and the Mayor had not employed Mr. Green without the knowledge of the committee. He uired of them. The Mayor did not put Mr. J. J. Green into this office to keep him out of the a[2 more...]
A. D. Quarles (search for this): article 11
t one officer. Mr. Granger was recommended at the same time, received no vote, but has since been elected to fill a vacancy. "What dirty work John J. Green does for the Mayor, besides acting as spy, he knew not. The only service he performs, that he was aware of, for the Commonwealth, was to make out the Mayor's papers — a service which from time immemorial, has been performed by one of the day police. John Pearce performed it for years. After him Cadmus C. Johnson, and after him A. D. Quarles, up to the time of his death. Each of them performed the duties without receiving additional pay. Any one of the day police could perform the work now, as the Mayor keeps them all in daily attendance upon his court, whether they have business there or not. But when the Council refused to make a day officer of Green, the Mayor made this place and put him into it, in the face of the vote against him. If the Mayor must have a clerk, why did he not take one of his day officers, or ask the C
erk, why did he not take one of his day officers, or ask the Council to give him a clerk? Because he knew the Council would not elect John J. Green; and he must, therefore, to keep this man out of the army, pursue this unfair course — offer this insult to the Council." Mr. Hill thought the member ought to know before he made the charge of dirty work done for the Mayor. The office of Clerk had not always been performed by a day police officer, and was done a great part of the time by Mr. Tyler, a messenger to the Council, and the Mayor had not employed Mr. Green without the knowledge of the committee. He had spoken to him on the subject, and he thought there was no objection to it, especially as there were not enough of day officers to perform the services required of them. The Mayor did not put Mr. J. J. Green into this office to keep him out of the army. He ought not to be charged with keeping men out of the army, when, by his late action, he has put six men into the ar
Wilson Williams (search for this): article 11
ntermeddler in affairs of other people? Who was it that made a mountain of this molehill? It was done by one little Mr. John J. Green, of New Kent; and who is John J. Green?" Mr. Hill stated that Mr. Green was the son of S. P. Green, of King William county, who was a Justice of the Peace in the county for years, and whose eldest son is now the presiding Justice in that county. He had married a Miss. Williams, of New Kent, whose father is a refugee here, and who has two uncles — Wilson Williams and Jas. Williams — who are both worthy and respectable citizens of Richmond. As to his being a spy or informer, or intermeddler in other people's matters, he was only doing his duty as policeman to report to the Mayor all violations of law and ordinances. The head and front of his offence was a concientious discharge of his duty. "The came man, who was recommended about a year ago by the Mayor as a fit person for day policeman, but who did not receive a vote, he believes, in thi
e was appointed but having to give up the house he then occupied, he could not get another in the city, and got one a short distance out of the corporation, without the Mayor's knowledge, or Green's knowing that it was against the ordinance of the city. The same privilege had been allowed Capt. Wilkinson, Captain of the Night Watch for a number of years; also Mr. Peachy R. Grattan who served as a member of the Council for 6 or 8 months after he had removed to the county of Henrico; also Mr. Wm Taylor who served as a magistrate for several months and was re-elected while residing in the county, and whose seat was contested, but the Council gave him his seat although living in Henrico. Mr. Hill does not know in what school of ethics the member from Madison Ward was brought up when he stated that Mr. Green's violation of ordinance in living out of the city was a great outrage, and only classed Capt. Pleasants's act of playing cards on the Capitol Square, sending an insulting messag
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