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United States (United States) (search for this): article 9
ent. The Mayor admonished him not to play detective officer again. Francis, slave of James Walsh, charged with stealing a lot of silver knives and forks and five spoons, the property of Mrs. Henderson; one skillet, the property of the Confederate States, and a lot of plates and dishes from some person unknown, was ordered to be whipped. The same punishment was awarded Ben, slave of Turpin & Yarbrough, charged with stealing eggs in the First Market from Amos, slave of Mr. Frank. The cproperty of Mrs. Henderson; one skillet, the property of the Confederate States, and a lot of plates and dishes from some person unknown, was ordered to be whipped. The same punishment was awarded Ben, slave of Turpin & Yarbrough, charged with stealing eggs in the First Market from Amos, slave of Mr. Frank. The charge against Booker, slave of Tazewell Perkins, of having six bags of corn in his possession, supposed to be stolen from the Confederate States, was continued till this morning.
t, while dragging Dorsin along Bread street, who was in a helpless condition from frequent potations of common whiskey.--The reason assigned by Carrington for his conduct was that Dorsin had spoken insultingly towards him personally, and used treasonable language towards the Southern. Confederacy, and its President. The Mayor admonished him not to play detective officer again. Francis, slave of James Walsh, charged with stealing a lot of silver knives and forks and five spoons, the property of Mrs. Henderson; one skillet, the property of the Confederate States, and a lot of plates and dishes from some person unknown, was ordered to be whipped. The same punishment was awarded Ben, slave of Turpin & Yarbrough, charged with stealing eggs in the First Market from Amos, slave of Mr. Frank. The charge against Booker, slave of Tazewell Perkins, of having six bags of corn in his possession, supposed to be stolen from the Confederate States, was continued till this morning.
currence between them. Mrs. Tucker complains that Wormly has recently become very annoying to her, and because she desired him to desist from his conduct he threatened to take her life. When called to the stand neither of them responded, and the matter was therefore postponed till this morning. Richard Carrington, charged with assaulting Philip Dornin, was dismissed upon the failure of the complainant to appear against him. Carrington, it will be recollected, was arrested by watchman Everett on Thursday night, while dragging Dorsin along Bread street, who was in a helpless condition from frequent potations of common whiskey.--The reason assigned by Carrington for his conduct was that Dorsin had spoken insultingly towards him personally, and used treasonable language towards the Southern. Confederacy, and its President. The Mayor admonished him not to play detective officer again. Francis, slave of James Walsh, charged with stealing a lot of silver knives and forks a
John R. Wormly (search for this): article 9
Mayor's Court. --The cases registered on Saturday morning were few in number, and soon disposed of. The following is a summary: John R. Wormly was charged with threatening the life of Emma Tucker. The parties occupy a tenement on 2d street, and it is said that disturbances are of frequent occurrence between them. Mrs. Tucker complains that Wormly has recently become very annoying to her, and because she desired him to desist from his conduct he threatened to take her life. When calWormly has recently become very annoying to her, and because she desired him to desist from his conduct he threatened to take her life. When called to the stand neither of them responded, and the matter was therefore postponed till this morning. Richard Carrington, charged with assaulting Philip Dornin, was dismissed upon the failure of the complainant to appear against him. Carrington, it will be recollected, was arrested by watchman Everett on Thursday night, while dragging Dorsin along Bread street, who was in a helpless condition from frequent potations of common whiskey.--The reason assigned by Carrington for his conduct was t
Philip Dornin (search for this): article 9
charged with threatening the life of Emma Tucker. The parties occupy a tenement on 2d street, and it is said that disturbances are of frequent occurrence between them. Mrs. Tucker complains that Wormly has recently become very annoying to her, and because she desired him to desist from his conduct he threatened to take her life. When called to the stand neither of them responded, and the matter was therefore postponed till this morning. Richard Carrington, charged with assaulting Philip Dornin, was dismissed upon the failure of the complainant to appear against him. Carrington, it will be recollected, was arrested by watchman Everett on Thursday night, while dragging Dorsin along Bread street, who was in a helpless condition from frequent potations of common whiskey.--The reason assigned by Carrington for his conduct was that Dorsin had spoken insultingly towards him personally, and used treasonable language towards the Southern. Confederacy, and its President. The Mayo
James Walsh (search for this): article 9
arrington, it will be recollected, was arrested by watchman Everett on Thursday night, while dragging Dorsin along Bread street, who was in a helpless condition from frequent potations of common whiskey.--The reason assigned by Carrington for his conduct was that Dorsin had spoken insultingly towards him personally, and used treasonable language towards the Southern. Confederacy, and its President. The Mayor admonished him not to play detective officer again. Francis, slave of James Walsh, charged with stealing a lot of silver knives and forks and five spoons, the property of Mrs. Henderson; one skillet, the property of the Confederate States, and a lot of plates and dishes from some person unknown, was ordered to be whipped. The same punishment was awarded Ben, slave of Turpin & Yarbrough, charged with stealing eggs in the First Market from Amos, slave of Mr. Frank. The charge against Booker, slave of Tazewell Perkins, of having six bags of corn in his possession, s
ht, while dragging Dorsin along Bread street, who was in a helpless condition from frequent potations of common whiskey.--The reason assigned by Carrington for his conduct was that Dorsin had spoken insultingly towards him personally, and used treasonable language towards the Southern. Confederacy, and its President. The Mayor admonished him not to play detective officer again. Francis, slave of James Walsh, charged with stealing a lot of silver knives and forks and five spoons, the property of Mrs. Henderson; one skillet, the property of the Confederate States, and a lot of plates and dishes from some person unknown, was ordered to be whipped. The same punishment was awarded Ben, slave of Turpin & Yarbrough, charged with stealing eggs in the First Market from Amos, slave of Mr. Frank. The charge against Booker, slave of Tazewell Perkins, of having six bags of corn in his possession, supposed to be stolen from the Confederate States, was continued till this morning.
ht, while dragging Dorsin along Bread street, who was in a helpless condition from frequent potations of common whiskey.--The reason assigned by Carrington for his conduct was that Dorsin had spoken insultingly towards him personally, and used treasonable language towards the Southern. Confederacy, and its President. The Mayor admonished him not to play detective officer again. Francis, slave of James Walsh, charged with stealing a lot of silver knives and forks and five spoons, the property of Mrs. Henderson; one skillet, the property of the Confederate States, and a lot of plates and dishes from some person unknown, was ordered to be whipped. The same punishment was awarded Ben, slave of Turpin & Yarbrough, charged with stealing eggs in the First Market from Amos, slave of Mr. Frank. The charge against Booker, slave of Tazewell Perkins, of having six bags of corn in his possession, supposed to be stolen from the Confederate States, was continued till this morning.
Emma Tucker (search for this): article 9
Mayor's Court. --The cases registered on Saturday morning were few in number, and soon disposed of. The following is a summary: John R. Wormly was charged with threatening the life of Emma Tucker. The parties occupy a tenement on 2d street, and it is said that disturbances are of frequent occurrence between them. Mrs. Tucker complains that Wormly has recently become very annoying to her, and because she desired him to desist from his conduct he threatened to take her life. When caMrs. Tucker complains that Wormly has recently become very annoying to her, and because she desired him to desist from his conduct he threatened to take her life. When called to the stand neither of them responded, and the matter was therefore postponed till this morning. Richard Carrington, charged with assaulting Philip Dornin, was dismissed upon the failure of the complainant to appear against him. Carrington, it will be recollected, was arrested by watchman Everett on Thursday night, while dragging Dorsin along Bread street, who was in a helpless condition from frequent potations of common whiskey.--The reason assigned by Carrington for his conduct was
Richard Carrington (search for this): article 9
conduct he threatened to take her life. When called to the stand neither of them responded, and the matter was therefore postponed till this morning. Richard Carrington, charged with assaulting Philip Dornin, was dismissed upon the failure of the complainant to appear against him. Carrington, it will be recollected, was arrCarrington, it will be recollected, was arrested by watchman Everett on Thursday night, while dragging Dorsin along Bread street, who was in a helpless condition from frequent potations of common whiskey.--The reason assigned by Carrington for his conduct was that Dorsin had spoken insultingly towards him personally, and used treasonable language towards the Southern. Carrington for his conduct was that Dorsin had spoken insultingly towards him personally, and used treasonable language towards the Southern. Confederacy, and its President. The Mayor admonished him not to play detective officer again. Francis, slave of James Walsh, charged with stealing a lot of silver knives and forks and five spoons, the property of Mrs. Henderson; one skillet, the property of the Confederate States, and a lot of plates and dishes from some p
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