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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 28, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 2
ain their own freedom, but would receive four hundred dollars bounty, thirty days furlough, with the privilege of going home and bearing away their families; that they would all remain in Kentucky, and in the course of six months the war would be over and they free. Thus thousands have already been removed from the fields where the growing crops required their labor to the various camps established for their reception. This, too, in excess of what was due from Kentucky. And in Southwestern Kentucky an office, using gunboats and Government transports as aids, was actively engaged with negro troops in forcibly taking hundreds of negroes from the fields to his camp; in many instances taking all the hands on large farms, leaving the crops to perish for want of cultivation. The Yankee editor of the Chronicle (Forney, the pimp,) holds the following language about a people that were once the proudest and quickest to resent Yankee insolence in the old Union. We predict that b
Boonsboro (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 2
Messrs Knodle and Small, shoe dealers, and Messrs Rouskutp and Updergraff, dealers in hate. The losses by these gentlemen were considerable. In Williamsport the raiders entered the stores and carried off whatever suited their purpose, and even entered private houses, compelling ladies to open bureau drawers in order that they might take therefrom any articles of value which they found The losses sustained by the merchants and dealing men of the place are said to have been heavy. At Boonsboro', where a heavy body of the enemy remained for a day or two, we have no intelligence of their operations other than that they destroyed the printing material of the Old Fellow newspaper, and took whatever property of a movable character they thought might be of use to them. In their course through the country they took wagons, horses, cattle, and sheep, without paying any respect to either friend or foe. A large steam distillery, about a mile and a half from Williamsport, belonging t
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 2
o the state, and which will effectually blockade marauding operations in future. Miscellaneous. The Philadelphia Enquirer quotes the prices fixed for wheat by the Virginia Commissioners, and tel's its readers to cheer up, that the Confederacy is about "going up; they can't stand it another year." The drought continues throughout the North, and is becoming, according to a Philadelphia paper, a serious question, "in view of the high prices demanded from the Government" The Indiana Banner relates the case of a mother in the neighborhood of Terre Haute who, whilst her son was asleep upon a sofa, put out his eyes with a burning coal, in order that he might be exempted from conscription. A private letter, received by a gentleman of Boston from London, gives a fact which we have not seen before published: "At the great commemoration day at Oxford last week, a Confederate officer appeared off the platform in his uniform, and was cheered to such a degree as to rise sev
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 2
hildren's clothing and toys, and fore to pieces the last mementos of departed friends and relatives. In relation to the shelling of Frederick City, the Examiner remarks: Very little damage resulted from the fire to which we were exposed. One shell passed through the roof of the Presbyterian Church, one hit the residence of the guerilla Bradley Johnson, on the corner of Court and Second streets, and several falling in different parts of the town, none of which exploded. The Hagerstown Herald states that in addition to the sum of $20,000 demanded by the invaders, to be paid by the citizen the following articles had to be furnished: Coats, 243; pants, 203, drawers, 132; hose, 737; boots, 99; shoes, 123; hats, 830; shirts, 225; piece goods, 1,270½ yards; clothing, 70 pieces, assorted Amongst the sufferers whose stores were rifled were Messrs Knodle and Small, shoe dealers, and Messrs Rouskutp and Updergraff, dealers in hate. The losses by these gentlemen were conside
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 2
le that were once the proudest and quickest to resent Yankee insolence in the old Union. We predict that before the last 500,000 draft is made Gov Bramlette and his slaveholding friends will be as completely prostrated as the slave power of Maryland has been. The damage Done by the invaders. The Frederick (Md) Examiner relates some incidents of the late invasion of that county and city. It appears that the ransom of $200,000 demanded by the raiders was paid under compulsion by the tion into a false position before the country and the world for the benefit of the disunion Democrats Raids that don't pay. The Baltimore American has come to the conclusion, since the matter has been brought home to the Lincolnties in Maryland, that raids are failures. It says: In view of the late results of the incursion, as well as those that have preceded it both sides of the contending forces, we cannot avoid the conclusion that raids, as a means of weakening and discomfiti
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): article 2
Additional from the North. From our latest United States files we gather some items of interest: Affairs in New York city. A gossipping letter, dated New York, the 20th, gives the following intelligence from "Gotham;" The "peace" reports in the morning papers may be — as most people say they must be — all moonshine; but, be that as it may, one good effect is already the result, and that is, a decline in the price of gold, and of almost every description of merchandize "Peace," or anything like an approach to it, would be death to the speculators and the kite-flyers. Hence the exceeding sensitiveness in Wall street whenever that blessed monosyllable is mentioned. A new "sensation" has been gotten up in the Central Park, in the shape of "concerts" on the lake by moonlight. The first performance of the kind came on last night, and attracted thither whatever little of the "beauty and fashion" are still left us, and attracted, also, not a few of the dangerous class
Terre Haute (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 2
in future. Miscellaneous. The Philadelphia Enquirer quotes the prices fixed for wheat by the Virginia Commissioners, and tel's its readers to cheer up, that the Confederacy is about "going up; they can't stand it another year." The drought continues throughout the North, and is becoming, according to a Philadelphia paper, a serious question, "in view of the high prices demanded from the Government" The Indiana Banner relates the case of a mother in the neighborhood of Terre Haute who, whilst her son was asleep upon a sofa, put out his eyes with a burning coal, in order that he might be exempted from conscription. A private letter, received by a gentleman of Boston from London, gives a fact which we have not seen before published: "At the great commemoration day at Oxford last week, a Confederate officer appeared off the platform in his uniform, and was cheered to such a degree as to rise several times and how to the galleries in acknowledgment of the honor."
United States (United States) (search for this): article 2
Additional from the North. From our latest United States files we gather some items of interest: Affairs in New York city. A gossipping letter, dated New York, the 20th, gives the following intelligence from "Gotham;" The "peace" reports in the morning papers may be — as most people say they must be — all moonshine; but, be that as it may, one good effect is already the result, and that is, a decline in the price of gold, and of almost every description of merchandize "Peace," or anything like an approach to it, would be death to the speculators and the kite-flyers. Hence the exceeding sensitiveness in Wall street whenever that blessed monosyllable is mentioned. A new "sensation" has been gotten up in the Central Park, in the shape of "concerts" on the lake by moonlight. The first performance of the kind came on last night, and attracted thither whatever little of the "beauty and fashion" are still left us, and attracted, also, not a few of the dangerous clas
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 2
rans, who, as we have reason to know, thought highly of him as an officer, and found him useful in the management of certain religious questions which came up in Tennessee, and in the arrangement of which we believe Col Jacques has been for some time engaged. The reporter who tells the story of Colonel Jacques's visit to Richmciliation, which he believes to be of immense power, can be used." From these hints it is not difficult for those who have known of Col Jacques's efforts in Tennessee to guess what has been his object in visiting Richmond. As that object must be as well known to the rebel Chiefs as it is to our authorities, else the Colonel whow the visit to the rebel capital could further it. Perhaps the reunion between Northern and Southern denominations which Col Jacques expected to bring about in Tennessee, with what success or effect we have not heard, he hoped also to further in other Southern States. But it is not probable that the pro-slavery churches of t
by the of destruction that swept over it. After the battle the infuriated thieves entered the house of Capt John McF Lycth, and broke up the furniture and demolished everything they could lay their hands on. The house was entirely emptied of its contents. The house of Mr C Keefer Thoman, which was occupied by the Union forces, suffered severely by the fire of the enemy. One of the shells striking it entered the dining room, and bursting occasioned considerable damage. During the fight Mr Thomas and family were in the sellar, all of whom escaped unhurt. Among the articles taken from his house were the clothing of his negroes. The barn of Mr Best, on the farm of Col Charles E Trail, was struck by a shell and destroyed. The house of Frank Maniz, on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, with part of his furniture and all the railroad property, were fired by the rebels and entirely consumed. Previous to the entry into this city, on the evening of the evacuation of our city by Gen
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