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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 15, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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Fort Gaines (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 1
vance out of Oxford last night. "All the particulars of the Fort Gaines surrender known, are that the commanding officer communicated with the enemy and made terms, without authority. His fort was in good condition — the garrison having suffered little. "He made no reply to repeated orders and signals from General Page to hold his fort, and surrendered upon conditions not known here. "D. H. Maury, Major-General." Each fresh development in regard to the surrender of Fort Gaines goes to prove that it was an act of cowardice or treachery on the part of its commanding officer, Colonel Anderson, of the Twenty-first Alabama regiment. The fort is a casemated work, mounting some fifty guns, was well manned, and provisioned for six months; and we have the assurance of General Maury that it was in good condition, and that the garrison had suffered but little. All this looks very dark for Colonel Anderson, though there is a vague hope — very vague, we confess,--that whe
Dutch Gap (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
s caused by an engagement between the enemy's gunboats and our iron-clads, in which our land batteries participated. The enemy, it appears, had commenced cutting a canal across the narrow neck of land formed by a bend in the James and known as Dutch Gap; and the object being supposed to be to flank our position at Howlett's, our forces determined to interrupt their digging operations. The engagement was a spirited one, the firing on both sides being heavy and rapid, and we are informed that teceived a shot through her smoke-stack and another was struck near the water-line, but not injured. --Our casualties in the land batteries were one killed and five wounded. Another account states that the Yankees were erecting a battery at Dutch Gap, and had landed three brigades there. Our fleet opened at seven o'clock A. M., and was joined by the battery at Howlett's, when the enemy's fleet, attracted by the firing, came up to the Gap and took part in the engagement. The Yankees were d
Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 1
to divulge. Below we give a-summary of the intelligence received at "these headquarters" since our last publication: From Mobile. The following official dispatch was received on Saturday: "Mobile, August 11.--Nothing later from Fort Morgan. The wires are broken. General Forrest drove the enemy's advance out of Oxford last night. "All the particulars of the Fort Gaines surrender known, are that the commanding officer communicated with the enemy and made terms, without authTennessee made a most gallant fight, and even when surrounded by Yankee vessels, and after having been struck amidships by the Monongahela, poured a full broadside into the port-holes of the flag-ship Hartford, causing a fearful loss of life. Fort Morgan seems to be bravely holding out, though, the telegraph wire having been cut, there is no direct communication with that point. Dog River bar, off which two vessels are reported, is much nearer Mobile than it is agreeable to have the Yankees a
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
rsburg. It was discovered on Thursday evening that the enemy was moving large bodies of infantry to the rear, and our forces, by way of facilitating their movements, opened upon them with a sixty- four pounder, which had the desired effect. The heavy missiles, bursting and crashing in their midst, gave a powerful impetus to their locomotion, and they more than "double- quicked" it from the front. It is stated that the Court of Inquiry which assembled at Grant's headquarters, near City Point, to investigate the causes of the terrible disaster of July 30th, has decided that, on account of the illegality of its appointment, it had no power to examine witnesses or go into the merits of the question. The matter has, therefore, been referred back to General Meade, who, it is said, intends preferring charges against Burnside, in which event a trial of that officer by court-martial will follow. One of the Yankee sanitary commission, named Wilson, who was wounded on board the s
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ndoah Valley, and it may be that a collision has taken place between his forces and those of General Early From Georgia. At last accounts the shelling of Atlanta continued with unabated vigor. The enemy was massing his troops on the left, but making no effort to extend his right. It seems not to be Sherman's intention to attempt to carry our works by assault, but rather to make a movement around, and endeavor to take Atlanta in the rear. This is what the Yankees call the "pot- hook" method. We have no doubt that General Hood is fully awake to the enemy's plans, and will meet them successfully when the day of trial comes. Sherman and Thomas botheet them successfully when the day of trial comes. Sherman and Thomas both telegraphed to Washington that Atlanta would be in their possession before the close of this (last) week; but as the city still stands, hurling defiance at the foe, they will have to telegraph again that they were slightly mistaken in their calculations.
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
the terrible disaster of July 30th, has decided that, on account of the illegality of its appointment, it had no power to examine witnesses or go into the merits of the question. The matter has, therefore, been referred back to General Meade, who, it is said, intends preferring charges against Burnside, in which event a trial of that officer by court-martial will follow. One of the Yankee sanitary commission, named Wilson, who was wounded on board the supply steamer D. A. Brown, on James river, some days ago, by rebel sharpshooters, has died of his injuries. The Yankees term this river firing "guerrilla operations;" say that it has become very annoying, and call for vigorous measures to stop it and punish the offenders. The shelling of Petersburg was almost entirely suspended last week, and the people enjoyed an interval of quiet to which they had for a long time been strangers. Various conjectures are indulged as to the reason of this cessation of a barbarous practice.
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
s supposed to have been caused by a renewal of the engagement. From the Valley. We have no later news from our forces in the Valley of Virginia. Passengers who arrived by the Central train last evening report that heavy firing was heard yesterday at Charlottesville in the direction of Winchester. The latest Yankee papers stated that Sheridan was moving up the Shenandoah Valley, and it may be that a collision has taken place between his forces and those of General Early From Georgia. At last accounts the shelling of Atlanta continued with unabated vigor. The enemy was massing his troops on the left, but making no effort to extend his right. It seems not to be Sherman's intention to attempt to carry our works by assault, but rather to make a movement around, and endeavor to take Atlanta in the rear. This is what the Yankees call the "pot- hook" method. We have no doubt that General Hood is fully awake to the enemy's plans, and will meet them successfully when th
Dog River (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 1
my's version of the naval engagement off Mobile, copied from New Orleans papers of the 9th. It shows that the Tennessee made a most gallant fight, and even when surrounded by Yankee vessels, and after having been struck amidships by the Monongahela, poured a full broadside into the port-holes of the flag-ship Hartford, causing a fearful loss of life. Fort Morgan seems to be bravely holding out, though, the telegraph wire having been cut, there is no direct communication with that point. Dog River bar, off which two vessels are reported, is much nearer Mobile than it is agreeable to have the Yankees approach, though when they have got there their task has but just commenced. It is gratifying to learn that Forrest is again at work in Mississippi. He has begun by driving the enemy's advance out of Oxford. Whenever Forrest strikes a blow he does it faithfully and well. From Petersburg. It was discovered on Thursday evening that the enemy was moving large bodies of infan
n, and they more than "double- quicked" it from the front. It is stated that the Court of Inquiry which assembled at Grant's headquarters, near City Point, to investigate the causes of the terrible disaster of July 30th, has decided that, on aed only by women and children, and aged, unarmed men. Hardly. A Yankee has no conscience, and particularly a Yankee like Grant, whose entire military reputation is staked upon the success of his present enterprise. The more probable solution is, tmovement." designed to astonish the world, but which, we hope, may result as disastrously to him as the last Silence with Grant means mischief; and let those who kindly attribute to him the possession of a conscience, quietly await the progress of enorth side of the James, and heavy skirmishing was kept up during the day, with no particular advantage to either party. Grant's entire force of cavalry was crossed to the north side of the river. The heavy firing heard down the river on Satur
locomotion, and they more than "double- quicked" it from the front. It is stated that the Court of Inquiry which assembled at Grant's headquarters, near City Point, to investigate the causes of the terrible disaster of July 30th, has decided that, on account of the illegality of its appointment, it had no power to examine witnesses or go into the merits of the question. The matter has, therefore, been referred back to General Meade, who, it is said, intends preferring charges against Burnside, in which event a trial of that officer by court-martial will follow. One of the Yankee sanitary commission, named Wilson, who was wounded on board the supply steamer D. A. Brown, on James river, some days ago, by rebel sharpshooters, has died of his injuries. The Yankees term this river firing "guerrilla operations;" say that it has become very annoying, and call for vigorous measures to stop it and punish the offenders. The shelling of Petersburg was almost entirely suspended l
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