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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 15, 1864., [Electronic resource].

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W. Hatcher (search for this): article 2
Our prisoners at Fort Delaware. We learn by the last flag of truce that Captains Richard E. Frayser, B. H. Smith and Charles R. Skinker, and Lieutenant Charles Williams, prisoners of war at Fort Delaware, are in good health, and bearing their captivity cheerfully, notwithstanding the heat of the weather and the circumstances by which they are surrounded. The following officers of the Forty-second regiment Virginia infantry, captured on the 12th of May, are also prisoners at Fort Delaware, and well: Captains A. Dobyus, O. W. Sprigs and James Helm; Lieutenants David W. Garrett, J. Arrington, Thomas Mitchell, Jerry Moorman, W. Hatcher, P. W. Dalton, A. R. Angel and Jesse Child.
A. R. Angel (search for this): article 2
Our prisoners at Fort Delaware. We learn by the last flag of truce that Captains Richard E. Frayser, B. H. Smith and Charles R. Skinker, and Lieutenant Charles Williams, prisoners of war at Fort Delaware, are in good health, and bearing their captivity cheerfully, notwithstanding the heat of the weather and the circumstances by which they are surrounded. The following officers of the Forty-second regiment Virginia infantry, captured on the 12th of May, are also prisoners at Fort Delaware, and well: Captains A. Dobyus, O. W. Sprigs and James Helm; Lieutenants David W. Garrett, J. Arrington, Thomas Mitchell, Jerry Moorman, W. Hatcher, P. W. Dalton, A. R. Angel and Jesse Child.
Fort Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): article 2
Our prisoners at Fort Delaware. We learn by the last flag of truce that Captains Richard E. Frayser, B. H. Smith and Charles R. Skinker, and Lieutenant Charles Williams, prisoners of war at Fort Delaware, are in good health, and bearing their captivity cheerfully, notwithstanding the heat of the weather and the circumstances Fort Delaware, are in good health, and bearing their captivity cheerfully, notwithstanding the heat of the weather and the circumstances by which they are surrounded. The following officers of the Forty-second regiment Virginia infantry, captured on the 12th of May, are also prisoners at Fort Delaware, and well: Captains A. Dobyus, O. W. Sprigs and James Helm; Lieutenants David W. Garrett, J. Arrington, Thomas Mitchell, Jerry Moorman, W. Hatcher, P. W. Dalton, A. Red. The following officers of the Forty-second regiment Virginia infantry, captured on the 12th of May, are also prisoners at Fort Delaware, and well: Captains A. Dobyus, O. W. Sprigs and James Helm; Lieutenants David W. Garrett, J. Arrington, Thomas Mitchell, Jerry Moorman, W. Hatcher, P. W. Dalton, A. R. Angel and Jesse Child.
es: In return for this kind treatment, what have our soldiers in their hands been subjected to ? A majority of the fifty who were exchanged yesterday have been confined for months and months in prisons from which, on account of the inhuman treatment they received, they never expected to leave alive. On the way to the Charleston prison, the same fifty officers were insulted, maltreated and robbed. The despicable fiends did not even spare the coat buttons of our officers, and when General Seymour was asleep, they actually cut from his coat all but four buttons. For those buttons the rebels received five dollars each in their currency. The officers state that, during the first few days of their stay in Charleston, they were subjected to the most barbarous treatment. Governor Curtin's message to the Pennsylvania Legislature. The extra session of the Pennsylvania Legislature met on the 9th instant. Governor Curtin, in his message, calls upon the Legislature to take
in New York as a joke that is being carried a little too far. It says: The Board of Supervisors yesterday came to the conclusion, by a formal vote, not to send agents to the rebel States for the purpose of recruiting among the accessible colored population. The decision is one supported by various valid reasons, without requiring a recourse to be had to imputations on the fighting qualities of the negro. The disaster suffered by the Ninth army corps on the morning of Saturday, the 30th ultimo, is not a pertinent argument against the policy of employing black troops-- not more pertinent, at least, than the accidental success of the colored division would have been a sound argument on the other side. The majority of the Supervisors seem to think otherwise; or rather, instead of taking the simple ground that negroes are not to be had in numbers sufficient to make up more than the merest fraction of the call, for reinforcements, they choose to make a party vote of it.--This is un
e be no excuse left for the disloyal to complain; so that the generous spirit in which our citizens have given their time and their means to the public service shall not be quenched; and so that, when the draft does come, it shall bear alike upon every section of the community. The exchanged Yankee prisoners from Charleston. The Yankee officers exchanged at Charleston have arrived in New York. In Charleston harbor they were dined by Major-Generals Daniel Sickles and Foster, and Admiral Dahlgren, to compensate them for the brutal treatment they had undergone at Charleston, some of which is thus truthfully described by a Morris Island correspondent of the New York Times: In return for this kind treatment, what have our soldiers in their hands been subjected to ? A majority of the fifty who were exchanged yesterday have been confined for months and months in prisons from which, on account of the inhuman treatment they received, they never expected to leave alive. On the wa
eresting extracts from it. The Situation at Atlanta — the fight of the 28th--Hood's style of fighting — the Siege a Slow business. The New York Times contains ows how much the Federals suffered. It appears that it was determined to attack Hood on his left, and for this purpose Logan's, Blair's and Dodge's corps were shifterrespondent thinks, was expected. This device, however, did not seem to deceive Hood, who also massed troops where the assault was to have been delivered, and pounce was nearly equal to ours." These disasters in front, and the inability to flank Hood, seem to have opened the eyes of the Yankees. The correspondent says: To he truth, we are somewhat puzzled at the stubborn front presented by the enemy. Hood has been dreadfully worried since our encroachments commenced, and has experiencclaim it as a fact, that Joe Johnston has been again placed in command, and that Hood has been sent to the rear. I will add that this is not generally credited.
le fiends did not even spare the coat buttons of our officers, and when General Seymour was asleep, they actually cut from his coat all but four buttons. For those buttons the rebels received five dollars each in their currency. The officers state that, during the first few days of their stay in Charleston, they were subjected to the most barbarous treatment. Governor Curtin's message to the Pennsylvania Legislature. The extra session of the Pennsylvania Legislature met on the 9th instant. Governor Curtin, in his message, calls upon the Legislature to take some action for the defence of the State. He speaks of the support rendered by Pennsylvania to the National Government, and says the State has fulfilled all her obligations. Pennsylvania has a right to be defended by the national forces as part of the common country. After alluding to the several invasions of the State by the rebels, he asks: "How could an agricultural people, in an open country, be expected t
July 22nd (search for this): article 1
of twenty-four pound howitzers in his command — the most destructive engines of war known — and his force, in an open field, can whip and put to flight an equal number of the rebels. It is reported in camp this morning, and the "strikers" claim it as a fact, that Joe Johnston has been again placed in command, and that Hood has been sent to the rear. I will add that this is not generally credited. Atlanta not taken. Atlanta is not yet (August 1) in Yankee possession. On Friday, the 22d of July, as I have before written you, an order was promulgated announcing the fall of Georgia's stronghold, and the whole army was deceived, as well as the correspondents, who — those connected with the Western papers — immediately repaired to Nashville to acquaint, by telegraph, their journals of the (supposed) fact. We, who contented ourselves with the idea of visiting the city before describing it, rather have the joke on those clever fellows who "saw the Star-Spangled Banner floatin
July 28th (search for this): article 1
We are indebted to the courtesy of Captain W. H. Hatch, of the Exchange Bureau, for a copy of a New York paper of the 10th instant. We give below some interesting extracts from it. The Situation at Atlanta — the fight of the 28th--Hood's style of fighting — the Siege a Slow business. The New York Times contains the latest news from Atlanta in the form of a very interesting letter. The account of the battle of the 28th of July shows how much the Federals suffered. It appears that it was determined to attack Hood on his left, and for this purpose Logan's, Blair's and Dodge's corps were shifted from the left to the right to make the assault. To cover this movement, a general advance of the Yankee skirmishers along the whole line was made on the 27th and was repulsed, as, the correspondent thinks, was expected. This device, however, did not seem to deceive Hood, who also massed troops where the assault was to have been delivered, and pounced on Logan before he got into
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