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Pascagoula (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 4
Another Newspaper correspondent banished. A letter from New York contains the following: "The banishment of Mr. Condon, the New Orleans correspondent of the London Index, I gave you about a week since. It seems he was permitted to remain in the city, however, for several days after the time specified in the order, and even this has again been changed by allowing him to remove to any foreign country. The original order, banished him to Pascagoula, along with Dr. Merritt and other citizens who were suspected of 'rebel' tendencies. Condon was to leave New Orleans positively on Monday last, 6th instant. The way he was trapped, I hear, was as follows: He had been charged with writing the New Orleans letters to the index, and Banks was determined to find out whether the charge was true or false. Accordingly he set a watch upon the letters that came to him (Condon) through the post-office. One of these, as ill-luck would have it, came from the Index office, with a draft enclo
Another Newspaper correspondent banished. A letter from New York contains the following: "The banishment of Mr. Condon, the New Orleans correspondent of the London Index, I gave you about a week since. It seems he was permitted to remain in the city, however, for several days after the time specified in the order, and even this has again been changed by allowing him to remove to any foreign country. The original order, banished him to Pascagoula, along with Dr. Merritt and other citizens who were suspected of 'rebel' tendencies. Condon was to leave New Orleans positively on Monday last, 6th instant. The way he was trapped, I hear, was as follows: He had been charged with writing the New Orleans letters to the index, and Banks was determined to find out whether the charge was true or false. Accordingly he set a watch upon the letters that came to him (Condon) through the post-office. One of these, as ill-luck would have it, came from the Index office, with a draft encl
llows: He had been charged with writing the New Orleans letters to the index, and Banks was determined to find out whether the charge was true or false. Accordingly he set a watch upon the letters that came to him (Condon) through the post-office. One of these, as ill-luck would have it, came from the Index office, with a draft enclosed for correspondence. The letter was resealed and allowed to be delivered to Condon. He endorsed the draft and sold it; the proof was positive, and the order for his banishment at once followed. Mr. Condon had charge of the Picayune at the time that journal was seized for publishing the bogus proclamation, which fact happened most unfortunately for the paper, as it has rendered the chance of its reappearance almost hopeless. Those who write from Banks's headquarters, or under his tuition, assert that 'it will not be' allowed to appear again, but this, I apprehend, depends upon how long the usurper holds away in the city wherein it was published. "
spondent banished. A letter from New York contains the following: "The banishment of Mr. Condon, the New Orleans correspondent of the London Index, I gave you about a week since. It seems hPascagoula, along with Dr. Merritt and other citizens who were suspected of 'rebel' tendencies. Condon was to leave New Orleans positively on Monday last, 6th instant. The way he was trapped, I hearher the charge was true or false. Accordingly he set a watch upon the letters that came to him (Condon) through the post-office. One of these, as ill-luck would have it, came from the Index office, with a draft enclosed for correspondence. The letter was resealed and allowed to be delivered to Condon. He endorsed the draft and sold it; the proof was positive, and the order for his banishment at once followed. Mr. Condon had charge of the Picayune at the time that journal was seized for publishing the bogus proclamation, which fact happened most unfortunately for the paper, as it has render
Another Newspaper correspondent banished. A letter from New York contains the following: "The banishment of Mr. Condon, the New Orleans correspondent of the London Index, I gave you about a week since. It seems he was permitted to remain in the city, however, for several days after the time specified in the order, and even this has again been changed by allowing him to remove to any foreign country. The original order, banished him to Pascagoula, along with Dr. Merritt and other cetters to the index, and Banks was determined to find out whether the charge was true or false. Accordingly he set a watch upon the letters that came to him (Condon) through the post-office. One of these, as ill-luck would have it, came from the Index office, with a draft enclosed for correspondence. The letter was resealed and allowed to be delivered to Condon. He endorsed the draft and sold it; the proof was positive, and the order for his banishment at once followed. Mr. Condon had charg
itizens who were suspected of 'rebel' tendencies. Condon was to leave New Orleans positively on Monday last, 6th instant. The way he was trapped, I hear, was as follows: He had been charged with writing the New Orleans letters to the index, and Banks was determined to find out whether the charge was true or false. Accordingly he set a watch upon the letters that came to him (Condon) through the post-office. One of these, as ill-luck would have it, came from the Index office, with a draft enc his banishment at once followed. Mr. Condon had charge of the Picayune at the time that journal was seized for publishing the bogus proclamation, which fact happened most unfortunately for the paper, as it has rendered the chance of its reappearance almost hopeless. Those who write from Banks's headquarters, or under his tuition, assert that 'it will not be' allowed to appear again, but this, I apprehend, depends upon how long the usurper holds away in the city wherein it was published. "
t of Mr. Condon, the New Orleans correspondent of the London Index, I gave you about a week since. It seems he was permitted to remain in the city, however, for several days after the time specified in the order, and even this has again been changed by allowing him to remove to any foreign country. The original order, banished him to Pascagoula, along with Dr. Merritt and other citizens who were suspected of 'rebel' tendencies. Condon was to leave New Orleans positively on Monday last, 6th instant. The way he was trapped, I hear, was as follows: He had been charged with writing the New Orleans letters to the index, and Banks was determined to find out whether the charge was true or false. Accordingly he set a watch upon the letters that came to him (Condon) through the post-office. One of these, as ill-luck would have it, came from the Index office, with a draft enclosed for correspondence. The letter was resealed and allowed to be delivered to Condon. He endorsed the draft and