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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: October 11, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Crawfordsville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 3
Vice President Stephens's views upon peace movements. The following letter from Vice President Stephens, giving his views upon "peace movements," was written in answer to a letter addressed to him by several gentlemen in the interior of the State of Georgia: Crawfordville, Ga., September 22, 1864. gentlemen: you will please excuse me for not answering your letter of the 14th instant sooner. I have been absent nearly a week on a visit to my brother in Sparta, who has been quite out of health for some time. Your letter I found here on my return home yesterday. The delay of my reply, thus occasioned, I regret. without further explanation or apology, allow me now to say to you that no person living can possibly feel a more ardent desire for an end to be put to this unnatural and merciless war, upon honorable and just terms, than I do. But I really do not see that it is in my power, or yours, or that of any number of persons in our position, to inaugurate any move
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 3
e President Stephens's views upon peace movements. The following letter from Vice President Stephens, giving his views upon "peace movements," was written in answer to a letter addressed to him by several gentlemen in the interior of the State of Georgia: Crawfordville, Ga., September 22, 1864. gentlemen: you will please excuse me for not answering your letter of the 14th instant sooner. I have been absent nearly a week on a visit to my brother in Sparta, who has been quite outg to a peaceful solution of the present strife. The war, on our part, is fairly and entirely defensive in its character. How long it will continue to be thus wickedly and mercilessly waged against us, depends upon the people of the North. Georgia, our own State, to whom we owe allegiance, has, with great unanimity, proclaimed the principles upon which a just and permanent peace ought to be sought and obtained. The Congress of the Confederate States has followed with an endorsement of th
Montgomery (search for this): article 3
crisis that tried men's souls" in their day. These are the that sustained them in their hour of need. Their illustrious and glorious example bids us not to underestimate the priceless inheritance they achieved for us at such a cost of treasure and blood. Great as are the odds we are struggling against, they are not greater than those against which they successfully struggled. In paint of reverses, our condition is not to be with theirs. Should Mobile, Savannah, Augusta, Macon, Montgomery, and and Richmond fall, our condition be worse or less hopeful than theirs in the hour that rested on their for With on the part of those who control our destiny in the cabinet and in the field, in husbanding and properly wielding our resources at their command, and in seeming the hearts and the affections of the people in the great cause of Right and liberty, for which we are struggling, we could all these losses and calamities, and greater even, and sun triumph in the end. At pre
Alexander H. Stephens (search for this): article 3
Vice President Stephens's views upon peace movements. The following letter from Vice President Stephens, giving his views upon "peace movements," was written in answer to a letter addressed to him by several gentlemen in the interior of the State of Georgia: Crawfordville, Ga., September 22, 1864. gentlemen: you Vice President Stephens, giving his views upon "peace movements," was written in answer to a letter addressed to him by several gentlemen in the interior of the State of Georgia: Crawfordville, Ga., September 22, 1864. gentlemen: you will please excuse me for not answering your letter of the 14th instant sooner. I have been absent nearly a week on a visit to my brother in Sparta, who has been quite out of health for some time. Your letter I found here on my return home yesterday. The delay of my reply, thus occasioned, I regret. without further explanaty should be adhered to. All questions of boundaries, confederacies and union or unions would naturally and easily adjust themselves according to the interests of the parties and the exigencies of the times Herein lies the true law of the balance of power and the harmony of States. Yours, respectfully. Alexander H. Stephens.
be formed or maintained between any States, North or South, securing public liberty, upon any other principle. The whole frame-work of American institutions, which in so short a time had won the admiration of the world, and to which we were indebted for such an unparalleled career of prosperity and happiness, was formed upon this principle. All our present troubles spring from a departure from this principle-- from a violation of this essential vital law of our political organism. in 1776 our ancestors, and the ancestors of those who are waging this unholy crusade against us, together proclaimed the great and eternal truth, for the maintenance of which they jointly pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor, that "governments are instituted amongst men deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed;" and that "whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, (those for which it was formed,) it is the right of the people to alter o
September 22nd, 1864 AD (search for this): article 3
Vice President Stephens's views upon peace movements. The following letter from Vice President Stephens, giving his views upon "peace movements," was written in answer to a letter addressed to him by several gentlemen in the interior of the State of Georgia: Crawfordville, Ga., September 22, 1864. gentlemen: you will please excuse me for not answering your letter of the 14th instant sooner. I have been absent nearly a week on a visit to my brother in Sparta, who has been quite out of health for some time. Your letter I found here on my return home yesterday. The delay of my reply, thus occasioned, I regret. without further explanation or apology, allow me now to say to you that no person living can possibly feel a more ardent desire for an end to be put to this unnatural and merciless war, upon honorable and just terms, than I do. But I really do not see that it is in my power, or yours, or that of any number of persons in our position, to inaugurate any move
on from the mother country. It was upon this principle that the original thirteen co- equal and co-sovereign States formed the federal compact of the old union in 1787. it is upon the same principle that the present co-equal and co-sovereign States of our confederacy formed their new compact of union. The idea that the old unionvention of the States I should have no objection, as a peaceful conference and interchange of views between equal and sovereign Powers — just as the convention of 1787 was called and assembled. The properly-constituted authorities at Washington and Richmond, the duly-authorized representatives of the two confederates of States nd, would doubtless be much better understood generally than they now are. But I should favor such a proposition only as a peaceful conference, as the convention of 1787 was. I should be opposed to leaving the questions at issue to the absolute decision of such a body. Delegates might be clothed with powers to consult and agree, i
Vice President Stephens's views upon peace movements. The following letter from Vice President Stephens, giving his views upon "peace movements," was written in answer to a letter addressed to him by several gentlemen in the interior of the State of Georgia: Crawfordville, Ga., September 22, 1864. gentlemen: you will please excuse me for not answering your letter of the 14th instant sooner. I have been absent nearly a week on a visit to my brother in Sparta, who has been quite out of health for some time. Your letter I found here on my return home yesterday. The delay of my reply, thus occasioned, I regret. without further explanation or apology, allow me now to say to you that no person living can possibly feel a more ardent desire for an end to be put to this unnatural and merciless war, upon honorable and just terms, than I do. But I really do not see that it is in my power, or yours, or that of any number of persons in our position, to inaugurate any move