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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1864., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
Confederate States district court. --In the case of William Barrett vs. P. A. Woods, Confederate States tax collector, Judge Halyburton delivered his opinion Saturday. The question at issue was whether Mr. Barrett should be permitted to pay his taxes in four per cent. Confederate bonds upon stocks held by him in Europe, or whether the law demanded payment in specie. The decision of the Judge was in favor of Mr. Barrett, entitling him to the advantage of settling in four per cent. bonds.-Confederate States tax collector, Judge Halyburton delivered his opinion Saturday. The question at issue was whether Mr. Barrett should be permitted to pay his taxes in four per cent. Confederate bonds upon stocks held by him in Europe, or whether the law demanded payment in specie. The decision of the Judge was in favor of Mr. Barrett, entitling him to the advantage of settling in four per cent. bonds.--The question involved several hundred thousand dollars, the difference of which between specie and Confederate bonds was quite an important matter to the parties interested. The habeas corpus cases of Edward F. Anderson and J. M. Haden, claiming exemption from military service — the first upon the ground of being a justice of the peace, and the latter on account of his religious faith, he being a Nazarene, and purchasing his exemption upon the payment of five hundred dollars, as allowed by
P. A. Woods (search for this): article 5
Confederate States district court. --In the case of William Barrett vs. P. A. Woods, Confederate States tax collector, Judge Halyburton delivered his opinion Saturday. The question at issue was whether Mr. Barrett should be permitted to pay his taxes in four per cent. Confederate bonds upon stocks held by him in Europe, or whether the law demanded payment in specie. The decision of the Judge was in favor of Mr. Barrett, entitling him to the advantage of settling in four per cent. bonds.--The question involved several hundred thousand dollars, the difference of which between specie and Confederate bonds was quite an important matter to the parties interested. The habeas corpus cases of Edward F. Anderson and J. M. Haden, claiming exemption from military service — the first upon the ground of being a justice of the peace, and the latter on account of his religious faith, he being a Nazarene, and purchasing his exemption upon the payment of five hundred dollars, as allowed b
Halyburton (search for this): article 5
Confederate States district court. --In the case of William Barrett vs. P. A. Woods, Confederate States tax collector, Judge Halyburton delivered his opinion Saturday. The question at issue was whether Mr. Barrett should be permitted to pay his taxes in four per cent. Confederate bonds upon stocks held by him in Europe, or whether the law demanded payment in specie. The decision of the Judge was in favor of Mr. Barrett, entitling him to the advantage of settling in four per cent. bonds.--The question involved several hundred thousand dollars, the difference of which between specie and Confederate bonds was quite an important matter to the parties interested. The habeas corpus cases of Edward F. Anderson and J. M. Haden, claiming exemption from military service — the first upon the ground of being a justice of the peace, and the latter on account of his religious faith, he being a Nazarene, and purchasing his exemption upon the payment of five hundred dollars, as allowed by
William Barrett (search for this): article 5
Confederate States district court. --In the case of William Barrett vs. P. A. Woods, Confederate States tax collector, Judge Halyburton delivered his opinion Saturday. The question at issue was whether Mr. Barrett should be permitted to pay his taxes in four per cent. Confederate bonds upon stocks held by him in Europe, or wMr. Barrett should be permitted to pay his taxes in four per cent. Confederate bonds upon stocks held by him in Europe, or whether the law demanded payment in specie. The decision of the Judge was in favor of Mr. Barrett, entitling him to the advantage of settling in four per cent. bonds.--The question involved several hundred thousand dollars, the difference of which between specie and Confederate bonds was quite an important matter to the parties intMr. Barrett, entitling him to the advantage of settling in four per cent. bonds.--The question involved several hundred thousand dollars, the difference of which between specie and Confederate bonds was quite an important matter to the parties interested. The habeas corpus cases of Edward F. Anderson and J. M. Haden, claiming exemption from military service — the first upon the ground of being a justice of the peace, and the latter on account of his religious faith, he being a Nazarene, and purchasing his exemption upon the payment of five hundred dollars, as allowed b
Edward F. Anderson (search for this): article 5
at issue was whether Mr. Barrett should be permitted to pay his taxes in four per cent. Confederate bonds upon stocks held by him in Europe, or whether the law demanded payment in specie. The decision of the Judge was in favor of Mr. Barrett, entitling him to the advantage of settling in four per cent. bonds.--The question involved several hundred thousand dollars, the difference of which between specie and Confederate bonds was quite an important matter to the parties interested. The habeas corpus cases of Edward F. Anderson and J. M. Haden, claiming exemption from military service — the first upon the ground of being a justice of the peace, and the latter on account of his religious faith, he being a Nazarene, and purchasing his exemption upon the payment of five hundred dollars, as allowed by an act of Congress passed February 17th, 1864,--were called; but, for reasons deemed sufficient, were postponed till next Thursday. The court adjourned till eleven o'clock to-day.
J. M. Haden (search for this): article 5
at issue was whether Mr. Barrett should be permitted to pay his taxes in four per cent. Confederate bonds upon stocks held by him in Europe, or whether the law demanded payment in specie. The decision of the Judge was in favor of Mr. Barrett, entitling him to the advantage of settling in four per cent. bonds.--The question involved several hundred thousand dollars, the difference of which between specie and Confederate bonds was quite an important matter to the parties interested. The habeas corpus cases of Edward F. Anderson and J. M. Haden, claiming exemption from military service — the first upon the ground of being a justice of the peace, and the latter on account of his religious faith, he being a Nazarene, and purchasing his exemption upon the payment of five hundred dollars, as allowed by an act of Congress passed February 17th, 1864,--were called; but, for reasons deemed sufficient, were postponed till next Thursday. The court adjourned till eleven o'clock to-day.
February 17th, 1864 AD (search for this): article 5
at issue was whether Mr. Barrett should be permitted to pay his taxes in four per cent. Confederate bonds upon stocks held by him in Europe, or whether the law demanded payment in specie. The decision of the Judge was in favor of Mr. Barrett, entitling him to the advantage of settling in four per cent. bonds.--The question involved several hundred thousand dollars, the difference of which between specie and Confederate bonds was quite an important matter to the parties interested. The habeas corpus cases of Edward F. Anderson and J. M. Haden, claiming exemption from military service — the first upon the ground of being a justice of the peace, and the latter on account of his religious faith, he being a Nazarene, and purchasing his exemption upon the payment of five hundred dollars, as allowed by an act of Congress passed February 17th, 1864,--were called; but, for reasons deemed sufficient, were postponed till next Thursday. The court adjourned till eleven o'clock to-day.