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Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 4
The recent victory in East Tennessee. The Yankees are in a critical situation in Knoxville. Gilliem's command is there, and cannot receive any reinforcements, as all the troops in Tennessee have been sent to Thomas. Gilliem's headquarters are in the old fair ground of the town. A letter in the Knoxville Register gives an iTennessee have been sent to Thomas. Gilliem's headquarters are in the old fair ground of the town. A letter in the Knoxville Register gives an interesting account of General Breckinridge's recent victory near Morristown. General Vaughn moved around to the rear of the enemy and General Basil Duke was to attack in front. The letter says: "Everything worked exactly as it was arranged. The ridge was gained on the morning of the 12th with but little resistance, and Gens through the bushes and by- paths.--The result of this brilliant movement has been: first, the complete route and dispersion of the Yankee force operating in East Tennessee; second, the capture of their entire transportation and artillery, consisting of seventy wagons, richly loaded with baggage and equipments of the whole comman
Morristown, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 4
dquarters are in the old fair ground of the town. A letter in the Knoxville Register gives an interesting account of General Breckinridge's recent victory near Morristown. General Vaughn moved around to the rear of the enemy and General Basil Duke was to attack in front. The letter says: "Everything worked exactly as it w nights I almost ever saw; just such a one as was desirable for the work ahead. The fight with the enemy was uninterrupted in its progress from Russellville to Morristown, and a dead Yankee here and there on the roadside, the prisoners and other paraphernalia that were streaming back to the rear, told how things were going at theit was in this pursuit. Duke's men fought splendidly, and not one of them was to be found anywhere except at his post. While Vaughn's boys, as they approached Morristown — the scene of their late defeat — began to swell on a big rampage, the retreat of the enemy was becoming more and more rapid; and their efforts to protect it g
Russellville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 4
that our army was still in Bull's gap, and had not suspected their evacuation, they neglected to observe the road leading through L — gap at all. The consequence was, that our cavalry took them completely by surprise and struck their column at Russellville about 12 o'clock at night, cut it in two, and then Vaughn had a chase that has been rarely equaled on this continent. Information was obtained that the wagon trains and artillery were in front, and these things were what our boys hankered for. The moon was at its full, and one of the clearest nights I almost ever saw; just such a one as was desirable for the work ahead. The fight with the enemy was uninterrupted in its progress from Russellville to Morristown, and a dead Yankee here and there on the roadside, the prisoners and other paraphernalia that were streaming back to the rear, told how things were going at the front. I do not think I ever saw the blood of our boys more disturbed than it was in this pursuit. Duke's men foug
at the enemy were very much disturbed about their situation. They bustled about, worked all day in plain view, fortifying their position, and giving us evidence of their intention to hold the gap in defiance; but the major-general commanding was not to be deceived by these preparations. About 9 o'clock P. M., our whole force moved to the flank and rear of the enemy, through — gap, Vaughn and Duke, with their cavalry, in the front. "So confident were the enemy that our army was still in Bull's gap, and had not suspected their evacuation, they neglected to observe the road leading through L — gap at all. The consequence was, that our cavalry took them completely by surprise and struck their column at Russellville about 12 o'clock at night, cut it in two, and then Vaughn had a chase that has been rarely equaled on this continent. Information was obtained that the wagon trains and artillery were in front, and these things were what our boys hankered for. The moon was at its full, a
Breckinridge (search for this): article 4
The recent victory in East Tennessee. The Yankees are in a critical situation in Knoxville. Gilliem's command is there, and cannot receive any reinforcements, as all the troops in Tennessee have been sent to Thomas. Gilliem's headquarters are in the old fair ground of the town. A letter in the Knoxville Register gives an interesting account of General Breckinridge's recent victory near Morristown. General Vaughn moved around to the rear of the enemy and General Basil Duke was to attack in front. The letter says: "Everything worked exactly as it was arranged. The ridge was gained on the morning of the 12th with but little resistance, and General Vaughn was promptly in their rear. The point at which the ascent of the ridge was made, however, was about a mile from the enemy's inner entrenchments. Our men were immediately formed in a line extending across it. The range is a very narrow one, having only room enough on top for a bridle path — very steep on the sides, and i
Basil Duke (search for this): article 4
le Register gives an interesting account of General Breckinridge's recent victory near Morristown. General Vaughn moved around to the rear of the enemy and General Basil Duke was to attack in front. The letter says: "Everything worked exactly as it was arranged. The ridge was gained on the morning of the 12th with but litommanding was not to be deceived by these preparations. About 9 o'clock P. M., our whole force moved to the flank and rear of the enemy, through — gap, Vaughn and Duke, with their cavalry, in the front. "So confident were the enemy that our army was still in Bull's gap, and had not suspected their evacuation, they neglected streaming back to the rear, told how things were going at the front. I do not think I ever saw the blood of our boys more disturbed than it was in this pursuit. Duke's men fought splendidly, and not one of them was to be found anywhere except at his post. While Vaughn's boys, as they approached Morristown — the scene of their
The recent victory in East Tennessee. The Yankees are in a critical situation in Knoxville. Gilliem's command is there, and cannot receive any reinforcements, as all the troops in Tennessee have been sent to Thomas. Gilliem's headquarters are in the old fair ground of the town. A letter in the Knoxville Register gives an interesting account of General Breckinridge's recent victory near Morristown. General Vaughn moved around to the rear of the enemy and General Basil Duke was to attack in front. The letter says: "Everything worked exactly as it was arranged. The ridge was gained on the morning of the 12th with but little resistance, and General Vaughn was promptly in their rear. The point at which the ascent of the ridge was made, however, was about a mile from the enemy's inner entrenchments. Our men were immediately formed in a line extending across it. The range is a very narrow one, having only room enough on top for a bridle path — very steep on the sides, and
eresting account of General Breckinridge's recent victory near Morristown. General Vaughn moved around to the rear of the enemy and General Basil Duke was to attack ridge was gained on the morning of the 12th with but little resistance, and General Vaughn was promptly in their rear. The point at which the ascent of the ridge wasr, bringing our wounded and stragglers off the field with us. The attack of General Vaughn in the rear, and of Colonel Crittenden in the front, were only intended as P. M., our whole force moved to the flank and rear of the enemy, through — gap, Vaughn and Duke, with their cavalry, in the front. "So confident were the enemy ttheir column at Russellville about 12 o'clock at night, cut it in two, and then Vaughn had a chase that has been rarely equaled on this continent. Information was obning until about three miles west of this place, a charge was made upon them by Vaughn, which resulted in their complete route — abandoning their entire wagon train a
Crittenden (search for this): article 4
scovered that about two-thirds of it had been lost in the underbrush. Our men began to hesitate; and the Yankees seeing it, immediately advanced upon us, and opened a fierce fire of grape and canister with their artillery upon the woods in which we had halted. There was no time to send back to bring up the stragglers. We were forced to fall back, which was done in good order, bringing our wounded and stragglers off the field with us. The attack of General Vaughn in the rear, and of Colonel Crittenden in the front, were only intended as feints. The main attack having failed, theirs, of course, was immediately abandoned. We then moved back and occupied the lines of the day before. The enemy, elated at their brief success, kept up a furious shelling, which did no other injury than to frighten a few of the weakhearted and render a surgeon nervous who was dressing wounds in the rear. The next day, the 13th instant, passed off in perfect quietness. It was evident, though, that the e
Ann Thomas (search for this): article 4
The recent victory in East Tennessee. The Yankees are in a critical situation in Knoxville. Gilliem's command is there, and cannot receive any reinforcements, as all the troops in Tennessee have been sent to Thomas. Gilliem's headquarters are in the old fair ground of the town. A letter in the Knoxville Register gives an interesting account of General Breckinridge's recent victory near Morristown. General Vaughn moved around to the rear of the enemy and General Basil Duke was to attack in front. The letter says: "Everything worked exactly as it was arranged. The ridge was gained on the morning of the 12th with but little resistance, and General Vaughn was promptly in their rear. The point at which the ascent of the ridge was made, however, was about a mile from the enemy's inner entrenchments. Our men were immediately formed in a line extending across it. The range is a very narrow one, having only room enough on top for a bridle path — very steep on the sides, and i
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