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Waterloo, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
adorned with the products of their genius. They might take some hints upon the subject from the so called "Captain" Gann, in Thackeray's last book — that red-faced man, who used to entertain his companions in bar- rooms with famous accounts of Waterloo and other battles, none of which he had ever seen. Some ragged young artist immortalized him in various sketches, respectively entitled: "Captain Gann (assisted by Shaw, the life guardsman,) killing twenty-four French cuirassier at Waterloo"; "Waterloo"; "Captain Gann defending Hougoumont"; "Captain Gann, called upon by Napoleon Bonaparte to lay down his arms, saying, "A captain of militia dies, but never surrenders."--The Duke of Wellington, pointing to the advancing Old Guard and saying, "Up Gann and at them." These sketches would form an admirable model to illustrate the redoubtable military career of Butler; and, if executed as the subject ought to be, would have a tremendous success. The pictures might be hung up in juxtaposition with a ful
New England (United States) (search for this): article 2
only needs a slight varnish of Puritanism to make him perfect. We grieve to say that "General Butler does not add to his other virtues that of being a hypocrite. The brethren ought to take him in hand, and induce him to become a member of the Massachusetts Young Men's Christian Association. With this single exception, Butler is an honor to his native State.--He has made his own fortune and unmade the fortunes of a good many other people. What higher recommendation could man present to New England admiration and respect. Lowell ought to present him the freedom of the city in a gold box. He has had the freedom of the South in a good many gold boxes for four years." In addition to these well deserved marks of respect, we recommend that an eulogium of his deeds be pronounced by the great and virtuous Caleb Cushing, who, if he has not served with him in the war (not being able to obtain a commission from Lincoln), at least served with him in the Charleston Democratic Convention.
Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 2
We have not yet heard what honors the city of Lowell and Commonwealth of Massachusetts propose to bestow upon General Butler. He is a native son of Massachusetts, and a glory to the State. He has cast all the renown of her Websters and Winthrops completely in the shade. He is the best embodiment of Massachusetts character that the war has yet produced. He only needs a slight varnish of Puritanism to make him perfect. We grieve to say that "General Butler does not add to his other virtues that of being a hypocrite. The brethren ought to take him in hand, and induce him to become a member of the Massachusetts Young Men's Christian Association. With this single exception, Butler is an honor to his native State.--He has made his own fortune and unmade the fortunes of a good many other people. What higher recommendation could man present to New England admiration and respect. Lowell ought to present him the freedom of the city in a gold box. He has had the freedom of the Sou
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 2
We have not yet heard what honors the city of Lowell and Commonwealth of Massachusetts propose to bestow upon General Butler. He is a native son of Massachusetts, and a glory to the State. He has cast all the renown of her Websters and Winthrops completely in the shade. He is the best embodiment of Massachusetts characterMassachusetts, and a glory to the State. He has cast all the renown of her Websters and Winthrops completely in the shade. He is the best embodiment of Massachusetts character that the war has yet produced. He only needs a slight varnish of Puritanism to make him perfect. We grieve to say that "General Butler does not add to his other virtues that of being a hypocrite. The brethren ought to take him in hand, and induce him to become a member of the Massachusetts Young Men's Christian Association. WiMassachusetts character that the war has yet produced. He only needs a slight varnish of Puritanism to make him perfect. We grieve to say that "General Butler does not add to his other virtues that of being a hypocrite. The brethren ought to take him in hand, and induce him to become a member of the Massachusetts Young Men's Christian Association. With this single exception, Butler is an honor to his native State.--He has made his own fortune and unmade the fortunes of a good many other people. What higher recommendation could man present to New England admiration and respect. Lowell ought to present him the freedom of the city in a gold box. He has had the freedom of the So
Lowell Academy of Fine Arts, if such there be; or, if not, Harper's Magazine, adorned with the products of their genius. They might take some hints upon the subject from the so called "Captain" Gann, in Thackeray's last book — that red-faced man, who used to entertain his companions in bar- rooms with famous accounts of Waterloo and other battles, none of which he had ever seen. Some ragged young artist immortalized him in various sketches, respectively entitled: "Captain Gann (assisted by Shaw, the life guardsman,) killing twenty-four French cuirassier at Waterloo"; "Captain Gann defending Hougoumont"; "Captain Gann, called upon by Napoleon Bonaparte to lay down his arms, saying, "A captain of militia dies, but never surrenders."--The Duke of Wellington, pointing to the advancing Old Guard and saying, "Up Gann and at them." These sketches would form an admirable model to illustrate the redoubtable military career of Butler; and, if executed as the subject ought to be, would have a
We have not yet heard what honors the city of Lowell and Commonwealth of Massachusetts propose to bestow upon General Butler. He is a native son of Massachusetts, and a glory to the State. He has cast all the renown of her Websters and Winth the war has yet produced. He only needs a slight varnish of Puritanism to make him perfect. We grieve to say that "General Butler does not add to his other virtues that of being a hypocrite. The brethren ought to take him in hand, and induce him to become a member of the Massachusetts Young Men's Christian Association. With this single exception, Butler is an honor to his native State.--He has made his own fortune and unmade the fortunes of a good many other people. What higher recommendating, "Up Gann and at them." These sketches would form an admirable model to illustrate the redoubtable military career of Butler; and, if executed as the subject ought to be, would have a tremendous success. The pictures might be hung up in juxtapos
hat an eulogium of his deeds be pronounced by the great and virtuous Caleb Cushing, who, if he has not served with him in the war (not being able to obtain a commission from Lincoln), at least served with him in the Charleston Democratic Convention. The aid of the pencil might also be called in to illustrate his military career. A number of eminent Yankee artists should be employed at once for that purpose, and the galleries of the Lowell Academy of Fine Arts, if such there be; or, if not, Harper's Magazine, adorned with the products of their genius. They might take some hints upon the subject from the so called "Captain" Gann, in Thackeray's last book — that red-faced man, who used to entertain his companions in bar- rooms with famous accounts of Waterloo and other battles, none of which he had ever seen. Some ragged young artist immortalized him in various sketches, respectively entitled: "Captain Gann (assisted by Shaw, the life guardsman,) killing twenty-four French cuirassier
any other people. What higher recommendation could man present to New England admiration and respect. Lowell ought to present him the freedom of the city in a gold box. He has had the freedom of the South in a good many gold boxes for four years." In addition to these well deserved marks of respect, we recommend that an eulogium of his deeds be pronounced by the great and virtuous Caleb Cushing, who, if he has not served with him in the war (not being able to obtain a commission from Lincoln), at least served with him in the Charleston Democratic Convention. The aid of the pencil might also be called in to illustrate his military career. A number of eminent Yankee artists should be employed at once for that purpose, and the galleries of the Lowell Academy of Fine Arts, if such there be; or, if not, Harper's Magazine, adorned with the products of their genius. They might take some hints upon the subject from the so called "Captain" Gann, in Thackeray's last book — that red-fa
Caleb Cushing (search for this): article 2
tler is an honor to his native State.--He has made his own fortune and unmade the fortunes of a good many other people. What higher recommendation could man present to New England admiration and respect. Lowell ought to present him the freedom of the city in a gold box. He has had the freedom of the South in a good many gold boxes for four years." In addition to these well deserved marks of respect, we recommend that an eulogium of his deeds be pronounced by the great and virtuous Caleb Cushing, who, if he has not served with him in the war (not being able to obtain a commission from Lincoln), at least served with him in the Charleston Democratic Convention. The aid of the pencil might also be called in to illustrate his military career. A number of eminent Yankee artists should be employed at once for that purpose, and the galleries of the Lowell Academy of Fine Arts, if such there be; or, if not, Harper's Magazine, adorned with the products of their genius. They might take
Thackeray (search for this): article 2
o obtain a commission from Lincoln), at least served with him in the Charleston Democratic Convention. The aid of the pencil might also be called in to illustrate his military career. A number of eminent Yankee artists should be employed at once for that purpose, and the galleries of the Lowell Academy of Fine Arts, if such there be; or, if not, Harper's Magazine, adorned with the products of their genius. They might take some hints upon the subject from the so called "Captain" Gann, in Thackeray's last book — that red-faced man, who used to entertain his companions in bar- rooms with famous accounts of Waterloo and other battles, none of which he had ever seen. Some ragged young artist immortalized him in various sketches, respectively entitled: "Captain Gann (assisted by Shaw, the life guardsman,) killing twenty-four French cuirassier at Waterloo"; "Captain Gann defending Hougoumont"; "Captain Gann, called upon by Napoleon Bonaparte to lay down his arms, saying, "A captain of mi
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