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nsible utterance of an excited politician, and still less of a street corner oracle; it is the voice of the highest military authority in the Confederacy; of a man better informed than any other of the resources of the enemy and of our own; it is spoken in the freedom of social intercourse, and not for public effect; and it comes from a man who never exaggerates, and who would not stain his honor by deception for all the renown the world could give. Do the people believe Robert E. Lee? And if they do, will they not dismiss at once that "foolish despair" which, he assures them, is the only obstacle to their independence? The people of the Confederacy know at last what the loss of their independence means. They have that knowledge from the Federal Congress, and from the lips of Lincoln and Seward. There is no earthly hope for them but in stern and unanimous resistance; and in that there is everything to hope. So General Lee declares, and that trumpet gives no uncertain sound.
Robert E. Lee (search for this): article 3
What General Lee says. A Richmond correspondent of a Southern paper says: "General Lee told Mr. W. C. RivGeneral Lee told Mr. W. C. Rives, the other day, that there was but a single thing to fear, and that was the spreading of a causeless despondespair. "To another distinguished gentleman, General Lee said that the attack of the press on the President pained him (Lee) very much. He had confidence in the President, and did not think we could find a better manource, which we consider entitled to credit, that General Lee said he was "surprised at the despondency of the citizens." When General Lee speaks thus; when General Lee says "we have strength enough left to win our indepenGeneral Lee says "we have strength enough left to win our independence, and we are certain to win it if the people will only not give way to a foolish despair," the people oughown the world could give. Do the people believe Robert E. Lee? And if they do, will they not dismiss at once nce; and in that there is everything to hope. So General Lee declares, and that trumpet gives no uncertain sou
W. C. Rives (search for this): article 3
What General Lee says. A Richmond correspondent of a Southern paper says: "General Lee told Mr. W. C. Rives, the other day, that there was but a single thing to fear, and that was the spreading of a causeless despondency among the people. Prevent that, and all would be well. We had strength enough left to win our independence, and we were certain to win it if the people will only not give way to a foolish despair. "To another distinguished gentleman, General Lee said that the attack of the press on the President pained him (Lee) very much. He had confidence in the President, and did not think we could find a better man for that place." We have also heard, from another source, which we consider entitled to credit, that General Lee said he was "surprised at the despondency of the citizens." When General Lee speaks thus; when General Lee says "we have strength enough left to win our independence, and we are certain to win it if the people will only not give way to a fo
sible utterance of an excited politician, and still less of a street corner oracle; it is the voice of the highest military authority in the Confederacy; of a man better informed than any other of the resources of the enemy and of our own; it is spoken in the freedom of social intercourse, and not for public effect; and it comes from a man who never exaggerates, and who would not stain his honor by deception for all the renown the world could give. Do the people believe Robert E. Lee? And if they do, will they not dismiss at once that "foolish despair" which, he assures them, is the only obstacle to their independence? The people of the Confederacy know at last what the loss of their independence means. They have that knowledge from the Federal Congress, and from the lips of Lincoln and Seward. There is no earthly hope for them but in stern and unanimous resistance; and in that there is everything to hope. So General Lee declares, and that trumpet gives no uncertain sound.