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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 24, 1865., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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France (France) (search for this): article 1
n the successes of General Scott in the North, and of Jackson in the South, but her naval disasters were a rankling thorn which the hand of time could neither extract nor soothe.--Up to that period, she had been the acknowledged naval mistress of that element, and it was necessary she should be so to protect the trade by which she lives, and to secure her existence as a first-rate Power. Napoleon once declared that, geographically, England was but a province of the Grand Empire, but between France and England rolled an ocean which even the genius of Napoleon could never bridge over to his coveted prey. Suddenly appeared upon the waters a flag which, for the first time, caused the meteor glories of the British banner to trail the sea. In all the late war she only gained two victories in the contest of ship to ship — a poor consolation for a long series of crushing defeats. Thenceforth the spell of British naval supremacy was broken. There was another nation whose sailors were as goo
McDonough (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
me. For thirty years she has labored with deep and unflagging determination to produce the disunion of the American States. She was actuated in those labors by the combined influences of interest and revenge. She never forgave the American Revolution. The loss of the most resplendent jewels of her crown was an unpardonable sin. The late war added a fresh flame, which has never yet been extinguished, to her bitter exasperation. The telling blows that Perry, Decatur, Hull, Chauncey, McDonough, and others, delivered, humbled her pride upon her favorite element. She would have forgiven the successes of General Scott in the North, and of Jackson in the South, but her naval disasters were a rankling thorn which the hand of time could neither extract nor soothe.--Up to that period, she had been the acknowledged naval mistress of that element, and it was necessary she should be so to protect the trade by which she lives, and to secure her existence as a first-rate Power. Napoleon o
Decatur (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 1
ach the measure of her crime. For thirty years she has labored with deep and unflagging determination to produce the disunion of the American States. She was actuated in those labors by the combined influences of interest and revenge. She never forgave the American Revolution. The loss of the most resplendent jewels of her crown was an unpardonable sin. The late war added a fresh flame, which has never yet been extinguished, to her bitter exasperation. The telling blows that Perry, Decatur, Hull, Chauncey, McDonough, and others, delivered, humbled her pride upon her favorite element. She would have forgiven the successes of General Scott in the North, and of Jackson in the South, but her naval disasters were a rankling thorn which the hand of time could neither extract nor soothe.--Up to that period, she had been the acknowledged naval mistress of that element, and it was necessary she should be so to protect the trade by which she lives, and to secure her existence as a fir
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
est of human abominations. Her public sentiment underwent at once a transformation little short of miraculous. All her organs of public opinion sounded the same emancipation note.--The pulpit, the press, the bar, the literature of England, became thoroughly saturated with the new philanthropy. The leaders of society gave the cold shoulder to slaveholders as the most execrable and wicked of mankind. All these influences were brought to bear upon the non-slaveholding communities of the United States. Emissaries, with their pockets lined with English gold, came to America to stimulate what was then a feeble anti-slavery sentiment in the North; to encourage the organization of Abolition societies; to circulate Abolition tracts; to inflame the Northern public mind against the institutions and principles of the South. For nearly thirty years England has been pushing on with her whole moral power, and, no doubt, such material aid as she could furtively render, a crusade which could hav
measure of her crime. For thirty years she has labored with deep and unflagging determination to produce the disunion of the American States. She was actuated in those labors by the combined influences of interest and revenge. She never forgave the American Revolution. The loss of the most resplendent jewels of her crown was an unpardonable sin. The late war added a fresh flame, which has never yet been extinguished, to her bitter exasperation. The telling blows that Perry, Decatur, Hull, Chauncey, McDonough, and others, delivered, humbled her pride upon her favorite element. She would have forgiven the successes of General Scott in the North, and of Jackson in the South, but her naval disasters were a rankling thorn which the hand of time could neither extract nor soothe.--Up to that period, she had been the acknowledged naval mistress of that element, and it was necessary she should be so to protect the trade by which she lives, and to secure her existence as a first-rate
John B. Floyd (search for this): article 1
At the beginning of this contest, there was one statesman of the South, now in his grave, who stood alone in the Confederacy, and we may almost say the continent, in his opinion of the probability of English intervention. This was the late John B. Floyd. He maintained, with distinctness and emphasis, that it was not merely the disruption of the old Union which England sought, but the material ruin of the two belligerents, in order that she might relieve herself of the commercial rivalry of to herself for not only the manufacture but the production of her own staple — an inferior kind, it is true, but still the best (Southern cotton out of the way) they could get. We well recollect the incredulity with which these views of Governor Floyd were generally received, and yet time has set the seal of truth to every word he uttered, and added another to the many illustrations his life afforded of statesmanlike sagacity. It only needed the application to the probable policy of Engla
of her crime. For thirty years she has labored with deep and unflagging determination to produce the disunion of the American States. She was actuated in those labors by the combined influences of interest and revenge. She never forgave the American Revolution. The loss of the most resplendent jewels of her crown was an unpardonable sin. The late war added a fresh flame, which has never yet been extinguished, to her bitter exasperation. The telling blows that Perry, Decatur, Hull, Chauncey, McDonough, and others, delivered, humbled her pride upon her favorite element. She would have forgiven the successes of General Scott in the North, and of Jackson in the South, but her naval disasters were a rankling thorn which the hand of time could neither extract nor soothe.--Up to that period, she had been the acknowledged naval mistress of that element, and it was necessary she should be so to protect the trade by which she lives, and to secure her existence as a first-rate Power.
ever reach the measure of her crime. For thirty years she has labored with deep and unflagging determination to produce the disunion of the American States. She was actuated in those labors by the combined influences of interest and revenge. She never forgave the American Revolution. The loss of the most resplendent jewels of her crown was an unpardonable sin. The late war added a fresh flame, which has never yet been extinguished, to her bitter exasperation. The telling blows that Perry, Decatur, Hull, Chauncey, McDonough, and others, delivered, humbled her pride upon her favorite element. She would have forgiven the successes of General Scott in the North, and of Jackson in the South, but her naval disasters were a rankling thorn which the hand of time could neither extract nor soothe.--Up to that period, she had been the acknowledged naval mistress of that element, and it was necessary she should be so to protect the trade by which she lives, and to secure her existence
ould neither extract nor soothe.--Up to that period, she had been the acknowledged naval mistress of that element, and it was necessary she should be so to protect the trade by which she lives, and to secure her existence as a first-rate Power. Napoleon once declared that, geographically, England was but a province of the Grand Empire, but between France and England rolled an ocean which even the genius of Napoleon could never bridge over to his coveted prey. Suddenly appeared upon the waters Napoleon could never bridge over to his coveted prey. Suddenly appeared upon the waters a flag which, for the first time, caused the meteor glories of the British banner to trail the sea. In all the late war she only gained two victories in the contest of ship to ship — a poor consolation for a long series of crushing defeats. Thenceforth the spell of British naval supremacy was broken. There was another nation whose sailors were as good as her own — a nation with nautical tastes and aptitudes, and with unlimited resources of ship- building and of men. As time passed on, the
F. Jackson (search for this): article 1
labors by the combined influences of interest and revenge. She never forgave the American Revolution. The loss of the most resplendent jewels of her crown was an unpardonable sin. The late war added a fresh flame, which has never yet been extinguished, to her bitter exasperation. The telling blows that Perry, Decatur, Hull, Chauncey, McDonough, and others, delivered, humbled her pride upon her favorite element. She would have forgiven the successes of General Scott in the North, and of Jackson in the South, but her naval disasters were a rankling thorn which the hand of time could neither extract nor soothe.--Up to that period, she had been the acknowledged naval mistress of that element, and it was necessary she should be so to protect the trade by which she lives, and to secure her existence as a first-rate Power. Napoleon once declared that, geographically, England was but a province of the Grand Empire, but between France and England rolled an ocean which even the genius of
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