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Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): article 2
The restoration of General Johnston to military duty has given great satisfaction to the country. It will impart still greater satisfaction to the army, which has the most complete confidence in his genius for command. The rank and file are, in general, the best judges of the competency of their leaders. The public at lach evidence of ignorance and fickleness. When it once gives a leader its full trust, it does so upon intelligent grounds, and he retains it to the end. General Johnston has always enjoyed, in an eminent degree, the confidence and admiration of military men and of the rank and file — those noble fellows who offer up their li all practice toleration for the errors of each other, and confide in the common sincerity and patriotism. Of one thing we entertain an abiding confidence. General Johnston, if he is able to rally around him an adequate force, will assist General Sherman to discover that a march like his through the interior of a great country i
aced him where he may, in some degree, retrieve the misfortunes of the past. His name alone will rally again to the Confederate standard those veterans of the South who, under his guidance, would long ago have interrupted the triumphal march of Sherman through an unresisting land. It is useless to mourn over the past. Let us all practice toleration for the errors of each other, and confide in the common sincerity and patriotism. Of one thing we entertain an abiding confidence. General Johnnresisting land. It is useless to mourn over the past. Let us all practice toleration for the errors of each other, and confide in the common sincerity and patriotism. Of one thing we entertain an abiding confidence. General Johnston, if he is able to rally around him an adequate force, will assist General Sherman to discover that a march like his through the interior of a great country is no longer to be a holiday pageant and may terminate in anything but a prosperous journey to Richmond