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Winnsboro (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
body, that the deliberate system of robbery, rapine, murder, starvation and burning, now carried on against this people, is not war, but a gigantic crime against humanity and against God. Our readers will recollect the scene in Columbia, where four thousand people were turned out of doors amidst roaring flames, and the communion vessels of a church were plundered and used in their orgies by drunken soldiers, blaspheming, as they drank, the name of Jesus Christ; and the later scene, in Winnsboro', where, as the church was burning, they sang blasphemous songs to the organ amid the sea of fire. Men wonder, when they read such accounts, that Heaven itself does not interpose, and, by some signal interposition of its vengeance, mark its sense of the crime. But that is not God's ordinary mode of dealing with man. In the dispensations of His Providence, "sentence against an evil work is not executed speedily." Men are treated as free agents, which they could not be if every step the tr
Jesus Christ (search for this): article 2
an account of the deeds done in the body, that the deliberate system of robbery, rapine, murder, starvation and burning, now carried on against this people, is not war, but a gigantic crime against humanity and against God. Our readers will recollect the scene in Columbia, where four thousand people were turned out of doors amidst roaring flames, and the communion vessels of a church were plundered and used in their orgies by drunken soldiers, blaspheming, as they drank, the name of Jesus Christ; and the later scene, in Winnsboro', where, as the church was burning, they sang blasphemous songs to the organ amid the sea of fire. Men wonder, when they read such accounts, that Heaven itself does not interpose, and, by some signal interposition of its vengeance, mark its sense of the crime. But that is not God's ordinary mode of dealing with man. In the dispensations of His Providence, "sentence against an evil work is not executed speedily." Men are treated as free agents, which th
w fearful that judgment will be, He waits with wonderful patience and benignity, exhausting the treasures of his goodness and long-suffering to bring them, if possible, to repentance, before he summons them to a bar where the voice of Mercy is no longer heard, and Justice condemns the guilty to pay, to the uttermost farthing, the long arrears of their crime. But as nations have no hereafter, and must hence be punished here for their wickedness; and as the North, in the re-election of Mr. Lincoln, has deliberately sanctioned his mode of conducting this war, those of its people who have any belief in a God cannot look to the future of their country without some dismal forebodings. "With that measure ye mete to others, it shall be meted to you again," is as true of nations as individuals. We are aware that the North is now exempt from calamities and misery; that it flourishes like a green bay tree, and riots in wealth, luxury and licentiousness. But who knows that, amid its revelr