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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 15, 1865., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
e associated press. A similar proposition was introduced in that body during the preceding Congress and discussed, as was the resolution to-day, but without, at that time, any result. It seems to be the opinion of some of these gentlemen that they can be best represented to the country through such arrangement by a reporter responsible only to themselves. Sentence commuted. Edward Lambert, of the Twenty-eighth Louisiana infantry (Confederate), who was sentenced to be hung, for murder, on Friday next, had his sentence commuted to-day by the President to ten years imprisonment in the penitentiary. The United States Supreme Court Test oath. It is believed that Messrs. Garland, of Arkansas, and Marr, of Louisiana, are the only two who have applied to the United States Supreme Court to be re-admitted to that bar without being required to take the oath of loyalty as prescribed by Congress. The question as to the constitutionality of the oath will be argued on Friday.
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): article 1
ed, at three P. M., there were about one hundred and fifty persons, including a good many ladies, who had not obtained admission. The Senate full — almost. The arrival of Senator Cragin, of New Hampshire, makes the attendance now complete of the Senators from all of the States at present represented. There is a vacancy from Iowa, caused by the appointment of Mr. Harlan to the Cabinet. Senator McDougal, of California, is in the city, but he has not yet appeared in his seat. The Tennessee members on the floor. The members elect to Congress from Tennessee, so far as they are present, to-day availed themselves of the privilege yesterday accorded to them in the House of occupying seats on the floor. Universal (negro) suffrage in the District. A large number of memorials in favor of universal suffrage are being presented in the House under the rule. Senator Morrill, of Maine, Chairman of Senate Committee on District of Columbia, is preparing a bill for enforc
Jefferson (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
eirpoint, of Virginia, addressed to the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House, enclosing a copy of an act passed by the General Assembly of Virginia repealing the assent heretofore given to the division of the State by the formation of the State of West Virginia. The letter was printed and laid upon the desks of members, and attracted much comment. It seems that the question first came up in the Virginia Legislature on a bill to settle the status of the two counties of Jefferson and Berkeley, in the Shenandoah Valley, which have been in disputed jurisdiction. This act was so amended as to repeal the assent given in 1863 to the formation of West Virginia. In order to be effective, the assent of the latter State must be had, as it has been recognized by all the departments of the Government, legislative, executive and judicial. A Virginia Senator on the floor. Mr. Segar, of Virginia, a Senator elect, has unlimited privilege to a seat on the floor of the S
California (California, United States) (search for this): article 1
eral Grant for his strictures upon his military career. When the doors closed, at three P. M., there were about one hundred and fifty persons, including a good many ladies, who had not obtained admission. The Senate full — almost. The arrival of Senator Cragin, of New Hampshire, makes the attendance now complete of the Senators from all of the States at present represented. There is a vacancy from Iowa, caused by the appointment of Mr. Harlan to the Cabinet. Senator McDougal, of California, is in the city, but he has not yet appeared in his seat. The Tennessee members on the floor. The members elect to Congress from Tennessee, so far as they are present, to-day availed themselves of the privilege yesterday accorded to them in the House of occupying seats on the floor. Universal (negro) suffrage in the District. A large number of memorials in favor of universal suffrage are being presented in the House under the rule. Senator Morrill, of Maine, Chairman
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
riod of time. The influence of such on the committee could only be deleterious. " Virginia and West Virginia. Washington, December 13. --Considerable surprise is manifested here at the receipt of a letter from Governor Peirpoint, of Virginia, addressed to the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House, enclosing a copy of an act passed by the General Assembly of Virginia repealing the assent heretofore given to the division of the State by the formation of the State of West Virginia. The letter was printed and laid upon the desks of members, and attracted much comment. It seems that the question first came up in the Virginia Legislature on a bill to settle the status of the two counties of Jefferson and Berkeley, in the Shenandoah Valley, which have been in disputed jurisdiction. This act was so amended as to repeal the assent given in 1863 to the formation of West Virginia. In order to be effective, the assent of the latter State must be had, as it has
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
whole subject of reconstruction would have been, we have no doubt, wisely disposed of by the standing committees; but unless the special committee is constituted with more discretion than the movers of it have yet displayed, we fear the question will be treated in a spirit of extreme partisanship rather than of statesmanship. There are unfortunately a few men in Congress who would like to see the present abnormal condition of things protracted; they do not scruple to speak of the late Confederate States as conquered and air of the Austrian bureaux; and they express a willingness to hold them in vassalage for an indefinite period of time. The influence of such on the committee could only be deleterious. " Virginia and West Virginia. Washington, December 13. --Considerable surprise is manifested here at the receipt of a letter from Governor Peirpoint, of Virginia, addressed to the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House, enclosing a copy of an act passed by t
Berkeley County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Virginia, addressed to the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House, enclosing a copy of an act passed by the General Assembly of Virginia repealing the assent heretofore given to the division of the State by the formation of the State of West Virginia. The letter was printed and laid upon the desks of members, and attracted much comment. It seems that the question first came up in the Virginia Legislature on a bill to settle the status of the two counties of Jefferson and Berkeley, in the Shenandoah Valley, which have been in disputed jurisdiction. This act was so amended as to repeal the assent given in 1863 to the formation of West Virginia. In order to be effective, the assent of the latter State must be had, as it has been recognized by all the departments of the Government, legislative, executive and judicial. A Virginia Senator on the floor. Mr. Segar, of Virginia, a Senator elect, has unlimited privilege to a seat on the floor of the Senate, and of
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 1
ground that he is occupying between the President and the majority in Congress, and from which he can hereafter go over to either side. He says: "Now that it is clear that no party can stand up against the irresistible doctrine that the States are all in the Union, the admission of Senators and Representatives will be a personal question; whether the individual applicant has borne arms against the Union, or whether he can take the above-printed Congressional oath? Thus, a State like Alabama may send six applicants for admission into the House of Representatives, three of whom can, and three of whom cannot, take the oath. The first three will be received, the last three returned to their constituents, who, if they choose, can perform the farce of John Wilkes to their own satisfaction as often as they please." The New York Evening Post, always a radical paper, advocates the President's policy openly — a good indication. It thus speaks of some of its party friends: "
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
uding a good many ladies, who had not obtained admission. The Senate full — almost. The arrival of Senator Cragin, of New Hampshire, makes the attendance now complete of the Senators from all of the States at present represented. There is a vacancy from Iowa, caused by the appointment of Mr. Harlan to the Cabinet. Senator McDougal, of California, is in the city, but he has not yet appeared in his seat. The Tennessee members on the floor. The members elect to Congress from Tennessee, so far as they are present, to-day availed themselves of the privilege yesterday accorded to them in the House of occupying seats on the floor. Universal (negro) suffrage in the District. A large number of memorials in favor of universal suffrage are being presented in the House under the rule. Senator Morrill, of Maine, Chairman of Senate Committee on District of Columbia, is preparing a bill for enforcement of qualified negro suffrage in the District of Columbia. It is pr
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 1
gal, of California, is in the city, but he has not yet appeared in his seat. The Tennessee members on the floor. The members elect to Congress from Tennessee, so far as they are present, to-day availed themselves of the privilege yesterday accorded to them in the House of occupying seats on the floor. Universal (negro) suffrage in the District. A large number of memorials in favor of universal suffrage are being presented in the House under the rule. Senator Morrill, of Maine, Chairman of Senate Committee on District of Columbia, is preparing a bill for enforcement of qualified negro suffrage in the District of Columbia. It is proposed to have it take effect at the next June election. So many intimations are heard in intelligent and influential republican quarters of the certainty of the passage of an act authorizing negro suffrage here, or the alternative of the repeal of the city charter, that the public are satisfied that one or the other will prevail in Con
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