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Fashion. For the benefit of our lady friends, we give a little gossip about the fashions for January in New York and Philadelphia: A favorite dinner dress is of violet Irish poplin, trimmed with blase bands of white poplin, arranged to simulate an overskirt. The coiffure is of point applique lace and violet velvet. The hair is rolled from the face and caught up in a waterfall at the back. This is an admired home dress: Ruby reps, trimmed with velvet buttons and ruby silk t be very ugly, utterly destroying the outline of the foot. The fashions of New York and Philadelphia are not pretty. There is an air of over-trimming, vulgar glitter, and an all-pervading flavor of shoddy and petroleum. We have given the fashions, but we entreat the ladies of Richmond not to wear them. The material points of this article are from the Ladies' Book for January, a copy of which the enterprising news dealers, Messrs. Cole & Turner, laid upon our table several days since.
ses have, in a great measure, given place to antique-looking bandeaux of gilt, steel or silver, either plain, engraved or filigreed. Some are ornamented with a richly-enamelled butterfly, poised on a fine wire, in the centre. The newest boots for young ladies are of lasting, laced up in front over a tongue of colored silk, which can be changed at pleasure to suit the dress. A small rosette of velvet, matching the tongue in color, is worn on the toe of the boot. This rosette on the toe must be very ugly, utterly destroying the outline of the foot. The fashions of New York and Philadelphia are not pretty. There is an air of over-trimming, vulgar glitter, and an all-pervading flavor of shoddy and petroleum. We have given the fashions, but we entreat the ladies of Richmond not to wear them. The material points of this article are from the Ladies' Book for January, a copy of which the enterprising news dealers, Messrs. Cole & Turner, laid upon our table several days since.
Fashion. For the benefit of our lady friends, we give a little gossip about the fashions for January in New York and Philadelphia: A favorite dinner dress is of violet Irish poplin, trimmed with blase bands of white poplin, arranged to simulate an overskirt. The coiffure is of point applique lace and violet velvet. The hair is rolled from the face and caught up in a waterfall at the back. This is an admired home dress: Ruby reps, trimmed with velvet buttons and ruby silk cord. The hair is crimped and arranged in a loose coil at the back. The coiffure consists of a band of ruby velvet studded with jet beads, and tied at the back with a ruby chenille cord. Also an evening dress, rather flashy than elegant, of white crepe puffed over silk. The cuffs are confined by bands of scarlet velvet edged with black lace. The overskirt of crepe is bordered by scarlet velvet and black lace, and festooned up very high on the left side by a bunch of white flowers and loo
ses have, in a great measure, given place to antique-looking bandeaux of gilt, steel or silver, either plain, engraved or filigreed. Some are ornamented with a richly-enamelled butterfly, poised on a fine wire, in the centre. The newest boots for young ladies are of lasting, laced up in front over a tongue of colored silk, which can be changed at pleasure to suit the dress. A small rosette of velvet, matching the tongue in color, is worn on the toe of the boot. This rosette on the toe must be very ugly, utterly destroying the outline of the foot. The fashions of New York and Philadelphia are not pretty. There is an air of over-trimming, vulgar glitter, and an all-pervading flavor of shoddy and petroleum. We have given the fashions, but we entreat the ladies of Richmond not to wear them. The material points of this article are from the Ladies' Book for January, a copy of which the enterprising news dealers, Messrs. Cole & Turner, laid upon our table several days since.