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th sharpshooters thus posted, the regiment was relieved by infantry and moved further to the right of the line of battle. After the battle of Williamsburg the Confederate army continued its retreat on Richmond, the cavalry protecting the rear. The Black Horse participated in the dangers and hardships of this service, in performing which they were compelled to subsist on parched corn. Near Hanover Court-House, while on picket duty, the Black Horse assisted in checking the pursuit of General Branch's North Carolina troops by Fitz John Porter, who had overpowered and badly worsted them, and in this effort lost many men wounded and prisoners. The command took part in Stuart's raid around McClellan's army as it lay before Richmond, which was esteemed at the time a brilliant and hazardous feat, and participated in the fight at the old church in Hanover, where the gallant Captain Latane was killed. The regiment to which the Black Horse was attached was now, for a time, camped near
supposed to have been made by one of Stuart's raiding parties, and in consequence a New Jersey brigade of infantry, stationed below Manassas, was ordered up to retake the place. Possessed with this belief, the command marched to within a short distance of the fortifications, when it was found that it had to cope with Jackson's infantry, instead of Stuart's cavalry. The guns from the fortification opened upon the advancing Federals in front, while on their left flank they were assailed by Braxton's Battery. In this trying situation the brigade behaved in a soldierly manner, and marched from the field with ranks unbroken and colors flying. But when they reached the woods they broke when they were charged by a detachment of twenty of the Black Horse, commanded by Jackson in person, and many prisoners were taken. Noiselessly and swiftly Jackson traversed the country between Hinson's ford and Bristow Station. With such caution was his march conducted, under the shelter of forest
John Brown (search for this): chapter 43
report to Governor Henry A. Wise, at Charlestown, Virginia, at which point were being collected the volunteer companies of the State to insure the execution of John Brown and his associates. When the command reached Piedmont station, now Delaplane, on the Manassas Railroad, it fell in with the Mountain Rangers, a cavalry companyecution, while the rest of the command was employed in keeping clear the streets, for it was feared even at the last moment that an attempt would be made to rescue Brown. Upon the return of the command to Warrenton, the ladies of that patriotic town received them graciously, and gave in their honor a handsome ball. So early was the strong and lasting covenant made between the women and the soldiers of the South! The John Brown war, as the people called it, gave an immense impulse to the secession sentiment of Virginia, and when South Carolina seceded and coercion was talked of, the captain of the Black Horse immediately tendered his command to Governo
John Buford (search for this): chapter 43
ring the skirmishing which took place with the Federal cavalry, several prisoners were captured, from whom information was gained that Lieutenant Payne had struck Buford's Brigade of Federal cavalry, who, having captured some of Jackson's stragglers, had heard from them, for the first time, of his. movement. The next day General t he ordered General Fitz Lee, with whom the Black Horse was serving, to cross the Rapidan at Raccoon and Morton's fords, where he found himself face to face with Buford's cavalry division. In the fight which ensued, the Black Horse lost some of its bravest men, and the Fourth Virginia two of its most gallant officers. This spirited attack, combined with an attack by General Lomax's Brigade, compelled Buford's retreat to the direction of Stevensburg, closely pursued by Lomax. Captain Randolph, in command of the Black Horse, with some other men from the regiment, arrived at Stevensburg as the Third Virginia Cavalry had been repulsed. Being in line of b
tle valued as life. To him, by general consent, therefore, the rifle was awarded as the bravest of the brave. About this time General Lee, having heard that Burnside had been moved by sea from North Carolina, and was at Fredericksburg, sent a brigade of cavalry, which embraced the Black Horse, to make a reconnoissance in thatLee crossed the Blue Ridge, at Chester gap, and took position on the south bank of the Rappahannock. He was there informed that McClellan had been relieved, and Burnside promoted to the command of the Federal army, and that he had indicated his intention of marching toward Fredericksburg. Lee again put his army in motion, and posted it on the Spottsylvania Heights, at Fredericksburg, and confronted Burnside on the opposite side of the river. The Union army again suffered defeat, and again changed its general. In the winter of 1863, while General Hooker was on the north bank of the Rappahannock, the Black Horse was detached from the Fourth Virginia C
Andrew Campbell (search for this): chapter 43
by his command, dashed alone into the midst of the Black Horse. No one fired at him, the men not wishing to kill so brave an officer. With his sabre he wounded several of the command, and some one knocked him from his horse, and might have killed him but for the interposition of Captain Henry Lee, a brother of Fitz Lee, who, observing the dismounted officer to make the Masonic sign, went to his assistance. During this campaign, and after the affair just mentioned, George W. Martin and Campbell, of the Black Horse, with a member of the First Virginia Regiment, were returning from a scout late in the evening. It was raining, and the soldiers had their oilcloths thrown over their shoulders, which, in a great measure, concealed their uniform. On looking back, they saw three mounted men coming up behind them, whom they inferred were Union soldiers, as they were in the rear of Sheridan's forces. Drawing and cocking their pistols, they rode slowly, that they might be overtaken. The
James H. Childs (search for this): chapter 43
The lost principle. Robert Randolph, a young lawyer of the Warrenton bar, was chosen first lieutenant; Charles H. Gordon, a planter, residing near Bealton, was elected second lieutenant. The noncommissioned officers were: William R. Smith, first sergeant, who was during the war elected a lieutenant of the command, and was afterward one of the most distinguished captains of Mosby's Partisan Battalion, but was killed, sword in hand, in a night attack on a Federal camp at Harper's Ferry; James H. Childs was elected second sergeant; Richard Lewis was elected third sergeant; Robert Mitchell was elected fourth sergeant. The corporals were: Wellington Millon, Madison Tyler, N. A. Clopton, and M. K. James. These were all young gentlemen of the first respectability, and were either themselves planters or the sons of planters. The rank and file were composed of young men of the same social material with the officers. Among then were to be found James Keith, now well known as one of the a
N. A. Clopton (search for this): chapter 43
. The noncommissioned officers were: William R. Smith, first sergeant, who was during the war elected a lieutenant of the command, and was afterward one of the most distinguished captains of Mosby's Partisan Battalion, but was killed, sword in hand, in a night attack on a Federal camp at Harper's Ferry; James H. Childs was elected second sergeant; Richard Lewis was elected third sergeant; Robert Mitchell was elected fourth sergeant. The corporals were: Wellington Millon, Madison Tyler, N. A. Clopton, and M. K. James. These were all young gentlemen of the first respectability, and were either themselves planters or the sons of planters. The rank and file were composed of young men of the same social material with the officers. Among then were to be found James Keith, now well known as one of the ablest and most distinguished judges in Virginia, and William H. Payne, a leading member of the Virginia bar, who, during the war, rose to be a brigadier general in Stuart's cavalry divis
and that the cause for which they had all fought had been lost. The Black Horse Cavalry was then disbanded, on the margin of the same river on which it had been organized, and but two miles lower down the stream. The Black Horse Cavalry may now be found settled, for the most part, in their native seat, Lower Fauquier, as diligent in peace as they were courageous and faithful in war. But members of the command may be found scattered among the States, assiduous, in all the fields of enterprise, to catch the golden six miles of fortune. Of the Black Horse it may be said, as it was said of Cromwell's Ironsides, except that they tread the higher walks of life: That, in every department of honest industry, the discharged warriors prospered beyond other men; that none were charged with theft or robbery; that none were heard to ask an alms; and that if a baker, a mason, or a wagoner attracted notice by his diligence or sobriety, he was, in all probability, one of Oliver's old soldiers.
Orange court (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 43
affair took place between the two armies, the Fourth Virginia Cavalry holding Roberson's ford on the Rapidan and repelling the efforts of the enemy's cavalry to effect a passage of the river at that point. From this point the Black Horse, with the exception of Sergeant Reid's party, were sent to Upper Fauquier and Loudon counties to observe and report the enemy's movements, on which duty they remained during the winter, at the close of which they were ordered to report to the regiment at Orange Court- House. In the spring of 1864, before Grant, who now commanded the Union army, began his forward movement, General Sedgwick made a reconnoissance in force in the direction of Madison Court-House, and was met by A. P. Hill's Corps. In the collision which ensued Second Lieutenant Marshall James, one of the most gallant officers of the Black Horse, with a small detachment, greatly distinguished himself. In the latter part of April the cavalry corps marched to Fredericksburg and took posit
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