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Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 43
Upon the advance of General McDowell, the Black Horse rejoined the army at Manassas. On the 4th of July, in an attempt to ambuscade a detachment of the enemy, two members were killed and several wounded by the mistaken fire of a South Carolina regiment of infantry. In the memorable battle of the 21st of July, in which so absolute a victory was won by the Confederate arms, the Black Horse Cavalry distinguished itself in the pursuit of the flying enemy, and the next day were thanked by President Davis in a speech. Soon after the battle of Manassas, the Black Horse Cavalry was selected by General Joseph E. Johnston, commanding the army, to be his body-guard. In this capacity it received Prince Napoleon and his suite, consisting of Count Sartiges and others, upon their visit to the Confederate army, escorted them to the general's headquarters, and was, the next day, the escort at a review of the army at Centreville. In the fall of 1861 the command was incorporated in the Fourth V
point had been moved toward Spottsylvania Court-House, and to discover, if possible, at what point Grant was concentrating his army. The scouts, being entirely unacquainted with the country, were sent to General Early, in the hope of obtaining a guide. But while Early could not furnish them a guide, he concerted with them signals, which, being communicated to the pickets, would enable them to re-enter his camp at any hour of the night, and himself conducted them through the lines of General Joe Davis' Brigade. Protected by the darkness, they soon found themselves in the midst of Grant's moving army, and made the discovery that the troops from Chancellorsville had been moved up to Spottsylvania Court-House, and that the centre of Grant's camp was south thirty degrees east from a particular house which had been marked on General Lee's diagram of the country, and furthermore that the Federals were throwing up earthworks. As soon as this information was communicated to General Lee, h
mand was incorporated in the Fourth Virginia Cavalry, when Captain William H. Payne was promoted to be major of the regiment, and Lieutenant Robert Randolph succeeded to the captaincy, but was soon after detached to form the body-guard of General Earl Van Dorn, commanding a division at Manassas. When General Earl Van Dorn was assigned to an independent command in the further South, he made an unsuccessful application to be allowed to carry the Black Horse with him. In the spring of 1862 the coGeneral Earl Van Dorn was assigned to an independent command in the further South, he made an unsuccessful application to be allowed to carry the Black Horse with him. In the spring of 1862 the command accompanied General Johnston to Yorktown, and on the march was employed as scouts in the rear, and as guides to the brigade and division commanders, on account of their familiarity with the roads, water-courses, and points suitable for camping. When the army reached Culpepper county it was reported that the enemy, under General Sumner, had advanced as far as Warrenton Junction. General Stuart ordered a detail of ten of the Black Horse to change overcoats with the Governor's Guard, their
Jubal A. Early (search for this): chapter 43
er battle at some point between Warrenton and Bealton. With this object in view he had crossed Early's Brigade, of Ewell's Division, on what is known as the Sandy Ford dam, a point two miles below entrating his army. The scouts, being entirely unacquainted with the country, were sent to General Early, in the hope of obtaining a guide. But while Early could not furnish them a guide, he conceEarly could not furnish them a guide, he concerted with them signals, which, being communicated to the pickets, would enable them to re-enter his camp at any hour of the night, and himself conducted them through the lines of General Joe Davis' B cavalry raiders. In August, 1864, General Fitz Lee's cavalry division was sent to reinforce Early in the Valley, who had fallen back after his campaign against Washington. In the fight at Wayneck Horse was the leading squadron of the Fourth Regiment, and was especially complimented by General Early. After driving the enemy through the town, the Confederate cavalry halted on a hill in the
e sound policy of secession would then have been vindicated, and have marked the beginning of a great nation instead of being hawked at as a perfidious bark built in the eclipse that has wrecked the fortunes of a people. The army marched for Edwards' ferry. Along the route there was manifested by the people the greatest curiosity and desire to see their great General-Stonewall Jackson, as he had been baptized on the battle-field. Groups would be collected on the road, composed of all ages object of the cavalry charge had been attained and the guns were withdrawn in safety, and the timely arrival of the rest of the brigade saved the detachment from destruction. When Stuart discovered Hooker's intention to cross the Potomac at Edwards' ferry, he left two brigades of cavalry posted between Lee and the Federal army to continue to perform outpost duty, while with the rest of his division he moved to the rear of the enemy's cavalry, and placed himself between the Federal army and
ahannock, to cross his army at the Fauquier Springs, and occupying Lee's ridge and the adjacent highlands, to compel Pope to deliver battle at some point between Warrenton and Bealton. With this object in view he had crossed Early's Brigade, of Ewell's Division, on what is known as the Sandy Ford dam, a point two miles below the Springs, to protect the men engaged in repairing the bridge at the Springs, over which the army was to pass. But this able plan was defeated by heavy rains, which fen order to regain his lost ground, the Federal commander was compelled to fight the second battle of Manassas. When Jackson struck the railroad at Bristow Station, where the sound of his cannon first apprised Pope of his whereabouts, he left General Ewell to guard the crossings of Broad run. He then moved down the railroad to Manassas, where he captured, in addition to several trains of cars, a large amount of army supplies, all of which were destroyed, except such as could be applied to imme
Randolph Fairfax (search for this): chapter 43
the rest of the brigade saved the detachment from destruction. When Stuart discovered Hooker's intention to cross the Potomac at Edwards' ferry, he left two brigades of cavalry posted between Lee and the Federal army to continue to perform outpost duty, while with the rest of his division he moved to the rear of the enemy's cavalry, and placed himself between the Federal army and Washington. This he effected, crossing the Bull Run mountain, and, after raiding through Prince William and Fairfax counties, recrossed the railroad at Burk's Station, where he found a large store of forage of great value to his tired animals. From this point he marched to the Potomac, at Senecca falls, where, as the fording was deep, the caissons were emptied and the bombshells carried over by cavalrymen in their hands. After capturing a canalboat laden with commissary stores, Stuart proceeded to Rockville, in the direction of Washington City. Here a large Union flag was flying, which he would not a
patiently awaited the approach of night, and, under its friendly cover, sought their various homes, which, four years before, they had left to fight for and protect. But the command was again collected at the Fauquier Springs, by order of Lieutenant Ficklin, Captain A. D. Payne being then a prisoner of war. They had resolved to repair to Johnston's standard, which was still, as they thought, flying in North Carolina. But the writer of this article repaired to their rendezvous, and informed LiLieutenant Ficklin that General Johnston, too, had surrendered, and that the cause for which they had all fought had been lost. The Black Horse Cavalry was then disbanded, on the margin of the same river on which it had been organized, and but two miles lower down the stream. The Black Horse Cavalry may now be found settled, for the most part, in their native seat, Lower Fauquier, as diligent in peace as they were courageous and faithful in war. But members of the command may be found scatter
he best contested of the war, the number of troops on the Confederate side being taken into account. The Fourth halted and then slowly fell back, passing Fort Magruder. The Federals followed, and when they reached the edge of the woods, ran out Gibson's Battery — to engage a Confederate battery in the fort. At the same time a company of the Richmond Howitzers, stationed on elevated ground on the opposite side of the road, also engaged the Federal battery, and a brisk cannonade was exchanged. General Johnston, who occupied a favorable position for observation, discovered that Gibson's Battery was worsted in the encounter and ordered the Fourth Virginia to charge. The regiment was already stripped for the fight, and passing Fort Magruder in a rapid charge, captured the Federal battery. Leaving a few men to take care of the capture, the regiment proceeded by that road into a dense wood, the land on either side of it being too miry for the operations of cavalry. At about two hundred
Charles H. Gordon (search for this): chapter 43
o establish the independence of a Southern Republic. Already had the storm-cloud began to gather, the hurricane to lower in the distance, and the organization of the Black Horse Cavalry was the first step which was taken in Fauquier county to meet the prognosticated war. The first captain elected was John Scott, a planter, residing in the neighborhood of Warrenton, and the author of The lost principle. Robert Randolph, a young lawyer of the Warrenton bar, was chosen first lieutenant; Charles H. Gordon, a planter, residing near Bealton, was elected second lieutenant. The noncommissioned officers were: William R. Smith, first sergeant, who was during the war elected a lieutenant of the command, and was afterward one of the most distinguished captains of Mosby's Partisan Battalion, but was killed, sword in hand, in a night attack on a Federal camp at Harper's Ferry; James H. Childs was elected second sergeant; Richard Lewis was elected third sergeant; Robert Mitchell was elected fourt
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