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Grant Ulysses Grant (search for this): chapter 43
Orange Court- House. In the spring of 1864, before Grant, who now commanded the Union army, began his forwardf Northern Virginia. In May they broke camp to meet Grant's advance from Culpepper into the Wilderness by way re fought the battles of the Wilderness, after which Grant commenced upon Richmond his celebrated movement by hhich the cavalry was employed to stem the torrent of Grant's advance until the infantry could be marched aroundt-House, and to discover, if possible, at what point Grant was concentrating his army. The scouts, being entirdarkness, they soon found themselves in the midst of Grant's moving army, and made the discovery that the troopto Spottsylvania Court-House, and that the centre of Grant's camp was south thirty degrees east from a particul beloved officer never perished on the field. On Grant's arrival near Richmond, a desperate engagement occurt of the day resisted and obstructed the advance of Grant's whole army, until Lee had time. to get his troops
D. McM. Gregg (search for this): chapter 43
orse shared, with their comrades of Fitz Lee's Division, the last rays of glory that fell on the Army of Northern Virginia, capturing an infantry brigade, and slaying its commander on the field. Near Farmville, the cavalry repulsed a division of Gregg's cavalry, which came upon them unawares, and nearly succeeded in capturing General Lee. But, instead, in this collision, General Gregg was taken prisoner. On April 9th, General Fitz Lee was ordered to hold the road from Appomattox Court-House General Gregg was taken prisoner. On April 9th, General Fitz Lee was ordered to hold the road from Appomattox Court-House to Lynchburg, which he did, in spite of repeated efforts by the enemy's cavalry to wrest it from him, until a flag, conveying the intelligence of a truce, compelled him to pause in his advance upon the enemy. Thus, sword in hand, the Black Horse, which had formed the nucleus of the Army of Northern Virginia, was found at the post of duty and of danger when that army of tattered uniforms and bright muskets surrendered to overwhelming numbers and resources. Of this army it might be said: Vital
Wade Hampton (search for this): chapter 43
nd for staff duty. In this raid Stuart took with him fifteen squadrons of horse, composed of details from his regiments, one of which the writer of this commanded. The raiders crossed an obscure ford of the Potomac, above Harper's Ferry, General Wade Hampton, with a battery of horse artillery, being in the van, and camped that night at Chambersburg. The next day they passed through Emmettsburg on their return to the Potomac, and, marching all night, early the ensuing day reached White's ford and deliver the heavy blow which the next day he inflicted on the Federal army at the Second Cold harbor. In this sanguinary engagement the Black Horse lost more than half the men taken into action. Soon after, at Trevellyann's Station, General Hampton fought, perhaps, the bloodiest cavalry fight of the war, in which the Fourth Virginia Regiment behaved with conspicuous gallantry, sustaining again a heavy loss. Sheridan was now compelled to retire upon the main body, harassed by the Conf
Isham G. Harris (search for this): chapter 43
ear Richmond, in which General Stuart was mortally wounded. On the 12th, they engaged the head of Sheridan's column, at Meadow bridge, on the Chickahominy, but, overwhelmed by the weight of superior numbers, were compelled to withdraw. In the execution of this order, Lieutenant Colonel Randolph, a former captain of the Black Horse, was instantly killed. A braver and more beloved officer never perished on the field. On Grant's arrival near Richmond, a desperate engagement occurred near Harris' shop, in which the Southern cavalry behaved with great gallantry, fighting for many hours as infantry, and for the greater part of the day resisted and obstructed the advance of Grant's whole army, until Lee had time. to get his troops up from his line of battle and deliver the heavy blow which the next day he inflicted on the Federal army at the Second Cold harbor. In this sanguinary engagement the Black Horse lost more than half the men taken into action. Soon after, at Trevellyann'
Erasmus Helm (search for this): chapter 43
Groveton, a place on the Warrenton turnpike, below New Baltimore. As soon as the two corps of the Confederate army were again united, Lieutenant Payne, with his detachment, was ordered to report to his command. The Black Horse, thus consolidated, took part in the great battle of the 30th, the Second Manassas, in which General Pope was as disastrously defeated as McDowell had been on the same ground. In this engagement, many members of the Black Horse were fatally wounded, among them Erasmus Helm, Jr., than whom there was no braver soldier nor more charming gentleman. The second battle of Manassas continued through three days, and was unsurpassed for severity by any fought during this bloody war. The effect of the heavy rain, which had prevented Lee from crossing his army at the Fauquier Springs, was now experienced in all its force; for Pope, in this prolonged struggle, was heavily reinforced from McClellan's army transported from Harrison's Landing, which could not have been d
A. P. Hill (search for this): chapter 43
he Black Horse, with the exception of Sergeant Reid's party, were sent to Upper Fauquier and Loudon counties to observe and report the enemy's movements, on which duty they remained during the winter, at the close of which they were ordered to report to the regiment at Orange Court- House. In the spring of 1864, before Grant, who now commanded the Union army, began his forward movement, General Sedgwick made a reconnoissance in force in the direction of Madison Court-House, and was met by A. P. Hill's Corps. In the collision which ensued Second Lieutenant Marshall James, one of the most gallant officers of the Black Horse, with a small detachment, greatly distinguished himself. In the latter part of April the cavalry corps marched to Fredericksburg and took position on the right of the Army of Northern Virginia. In May they broke camp to meet Grant's advance from Culpepper into the Wilderness by way of Germanna ford. On the 4th and 5th of May were fought the battles of the Wild
Old Joe Hooker (search for this): chapter 43
confronted Burnside on the opposite side of the river. The Union army again suffered defeat, and again changed its general. In the winter of 1863, while General Hooker was on the north bank of the Rappahannock, the Black Horse was detached from the Fourth Virginia Cavalry, and ordered to Lower Fauquier and Stafford county to During this time the command performed many brilliant exploits in its numerous encounters with the enemy, captured three hundred prisoners, and minutely reported Hooker's movements. Its services were handsomely acknowledged by General Lee and General Stuart in general orders. An incident that occurred at this time illustratettained and the guns were withdrawn in safety, and the timely arrival of the rest of the brigade saved the detachment from destruction. When Stuart discovered Hooker's intention to cross the Potomac at Edwards' ferry, he left two brigades of cavalry posted between Lee and the Federal army to continue to perform outpost duty, w
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 43
atest curiosity and desire to see their great General-Stonewall Jackson, as he had been baptized on the battle-field. Groupses and both sexes, black and white crowded together. When Jackson would be pointed out to them they would send up a great shHorse sent forward one of their members to ride as near to Jackson as military etiquette would allow. He was, by all odds, twith the utmost complaisance, received their compliments. Jackson, of course, had galloped on as usual. When the General, tntil the novelty wore off. The Black Horse accompanied Jackson in his expedition to Williamsport, Martinsburg, and Harper party halted, and built a fire in a skirt of woods. Here Jackson slept while a party was sent to discover the position of L gathering strength for another invasion of Virginia. But Jackson would not agree to Stuart's proposal. He said: I know the river at Harper's Ferry, Lee was encamped at Winchester. Jackson then restored the Black Horse to its place in the cavalry
Thomas J. Jackson (search for this): chapter 43
e was assigned to duty at the headquarters of Jackson, who was about to make his celebrated flank aCatlett's Station. But the blow delivered by Jackson was a far more serious one; for, in order to nt of twenty of the Black Horse, commanded by Jackson in person, and many prisoners were taken. Noiselessly and swiftly Jackson traversed the country between Hinson's ford and Bristow Station. est of the Black Horse command, remained with Jackson. The lieutenant retraced his steps, and repo the direction of Salem, the track over which Jackson had just passed, and encamped for the night be, for the rest of Stuart's cavalry were with Jackson. He dashed into the village, but was soon dried virtue and binding up its wounds, Lee and Jackson, sitting on a fallen tree, were engaged in cld the Potomac. From the crest of a high hill Jackson saw the retreating columns, and, at the same e thrown out to protect the Federal retreat. Jackson immediately attacked it, but with an inadequa[4 more...]
Thomas Jonathan Jackson (search for this): chapter 43
ven thousand fell into the hands of the captors uninjured, and many others in a condition that admitted of repair. A large proportion of the hands employed were sent, with the uninjured machinery, to an armory established in North Carolina. The Black Horse Cavalry, after remaining several days on picket duty at Harper's Ferry, was ordered on similar service, to Berlin bridge, which crosses the Potomac from the county of London. It was while the command were at Harper's Ferry that Major Thomas J. Jackson, of the Virginia Military Institute, was ordered, by Governor Letcher, to take command, and the high reputation which he had won in the Mexican war inspired the volunteers with cheerfulness and confidence. From Berlin bridge, the Black Horse was ordered back to Warrenton, where the vacant captaincy was filled by the election of William H. Payne, heretofore, as before stated, a private in the command. This gentleman was, at that time, a member of the Warrenton bar, and had been
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