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Theodore P. Terry (search for this): chapter 14
died soon after. The captain's aide, Mr. S. B. Brittan, Jr., had fallen by the shot as it passed through the gun-deck before entering the boiler. A seaman named James Coffey, who was shot-man to the No. 2 gun, was on his knees in the act of taking a shell from the box to be passed to the loader. The escaping steam and hot water had struck him square in the face, and he met death in that position. Jack Matthews had gone overboard badly scalded. He was picked up by the boats. Third Master Theo. P. Terry was severely scalded, and died in a few days. H e was a brave officer. Our loss in killed, wounded and missing amounted to 32. Of these three were killed instantly, four died that night, several were drowned (the number not definitely known), and about one-half the wounded recovered. The Flag-officer continued approaching nearer and nearer to the fort, pouring shot and shell from the boats at still shorter range . . . until they showed the white flag to surrender. When
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ort Henry. Shortly after the battle of Belmont the Confederates established a strong line of operations reaching to the centre of Kentucky. On their left was Columbus, where they had collected a strong force and 140 guns. One of their largest armies was at the junction of the Louisville and Nashville, and Memphis and Ohio Raiall calibres. Our Navy had already recaptured 211 of these Norfolk guns, and it remains to be seen what account it will render of those which now confront it at Columbus, Fort Henry and Fort Donelson. Grant knew the nature of these works better than any other officer, and saw that Bowling Green and Columbus could both be turneColumbus could both be turned as soon as Henry and Donelson fell. Halleck and others were making great strategic movements, which amounted to nothing, but Grant kept his mind steadily fixed on these two forts, knowing the effect their fall would have. On the 23d of January Grant visited Halleck at St. Louis, and urgently requested permission to make the
Wickliffe (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ow clearly demonstrated that the naval vessels on the Western rivers could sustain the fire of the heaviest batteries, notwithstanding the high authority to the contrary. To give an idea of some of the dreadful scenes to which our gun-boats were liable, we insert an interesting letter written after the battle of Fort Henry, by James Laning, the Second Master of the Essex, in which he thus describes the engagement: On February 1st, 1862, the iron-clad gun-boat Essex, whilst lying off Fort Holt, received orders from Flag-officer A. H. Foote, commanding the Western flotilla, to proceed up the Tennessee River, and anchor some five miles below Fort Henry, blockading the river at that point. The ironclads Carondelet, Commander Henry Walke; the Cincinnati, Commander Stembel, and the St. Louis, Lieutenant Commanding Leonard Paulding, were completed and put into commission a few days previous, making, with the Essex, four iron-clads, besides the wooden gun-boats Taylor, Lexington and C
Dover, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ver. Embrasures had also been formed by placing sand-bags on the parapets between the guns. On the land side there was an entrenched camp, and beyond this an extended line of rifle-pits, located on commanding ground. The earthworks covered the Dover road, by which alone communication could be held with Fort Donelson. The heights on the west commanded Fort Henry, but the works at this point were unfinished. Grant's plan was to land and attack the enemy in the rear, while Foote was to attaed General C. F. Smith to seize the heights on the west with two brigades. The rest of Grant's force, under Gen. McClernand, was to move at 11 A. M. on the 6th to the rear of Fort Henry, and take position on the road leading to Fort Donelson and Dover. where they could intercept fugitives and hold themselves in readiness to take the works by storm promptly on the receipt of orders. Commodore Foote's iron-clad gun-boats at Cairo. The fleet got under way at two o'clock on the day of the
Marshall Ford (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
nutes after the explosion our gallant ship (which had, in the language of Flagofficer Foote, fought most effectually through two-thirds of the engagement) was drifting slowly away from the field of glory; her commander badly wounded, a number of her officers and crew dead at their posts, whilst many others were writhing in their last agony. As soon as the scalding steal would admit, the forward gun-deck was explored. The pilots, who were both in the pilot-house, were scalded to death. Marshall Ford, who was steering when the explosion took place, was found at his post at the wheel, standing erect, his left hand holding the spoke, and his right hand grasping the signal bell-rope. Pilot James McBride had fallen through the open hatchway to the deck below; he was still living, but died soon after. The captain's aide, Mr. S. B. Brittan, Jr., had fallen by the shot as it passed through the gun-deck before entering the boiler. A seaman named James Coffey, who was shot-man to the No. 2
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
attack on Fort Henry. Shortly after the battle of Belmont the Confederates established a strong line of operations reaching to the centre of Kentucky. On their left was Columbus, where they had collected a strong force and 140 guns. One of their largest armies was at the junction of the Louisville and Nashville, and Memphis and Ohio Railroads (the northernmost point then held by the Confederates west of the Alleghany Mountains). These armies threatened Northern Kentucky and protected Nashville and Middle Tennessee. At the centre of this strategic line the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers formed the natural avenues into all the disputed territory north of the cotton States. These two streams approach within twelve miles of each other, at a point near the boundary between Kentucky and Tennessee. Here, at a bend in each river, the Confederates had erected two batteries, Fort Henry, on the Tennessee, and Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland. These forts completely commanded the nav
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): chapter 14
of the Alleghany Mountains). These armies threatened Northern Kentucky and protected Nashville and Middle Tennessee. At the centre of this strategic line the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers formed the natural avenues into all the disputed territory north of the cotton States. These two streams approach within twelve miles of ements from Danville and the mouth of Sandy River, as well as from Fort Donelson. The country around Fort Henry was all under water from the overflow of the Tennessee River, which impeded the movements of the troops on both sides. The rain fell in torrents on the night of the 5th of February, and Grant having an insufficiency of2, the iron-clad gun-boat Essex, whilst lying off Fort Holt, received orders from Flag-officer A. H. Foote, commanding the Western flotilla, to proceed up the Tennessee River, and anchor some five miles below Fort Henry, blockading the river at that point. The ironclads Carondelet, Commander Henry Walke; the Cincinnati, Commander
Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ieman evacuated. the gun-boats open fire on Fort Henry. description of the battle by a Confederate of the Essex. vessels engaged in attack on Fort Henry. Shortly after the battle of Belmont the sted permission to make the attempt to take Forts Henry and Donelson; both of which General C. F. SDonelson. The heights on the west commanded Fort Henry, but the works at this point were unfinishedas from Fort Donelson. The country around Fort Henry was all under water from the overflow of thessee River, and anchor some five miles below Fort Henry, blockading the river at that point. The irry, after reconnoitering up the Tennessee to Fort Henry, we fired a few shots at the fort and returnails of your great success in the capture of Fort Henry, is just received. I had previously informend gallantry exhibited in the bombardment of Fort Henry. Resolved by the General Assembly of the St wounded on the iron-clads in this battle at Fort Henry, a small number for so long a fight, but thi[17 more...]
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
Shortly after the battle of Belmont the Confederates established a strong line of operations reaching to the centre of Kentucky. On their left was Columbus, where they had collected a strong force and 140 guns. One of their largest armies was at ads (the northernmost point then held by the Confederates west of the Alleghany Mountains). These armies threatened Northern Kentucky and protected Nashville and Middle Tennessee. At the centre of this strategic line the Tennessee and Cumberland f the cotton States. These two streams approach within twelve miles of each other, at a point near the boundary between Kentucky and Tennessee. Here, at a bend in each river, the Confederates had erected two batteries, Fort Henry, on the Tennessee,bidding any advance of the Union gun-boats or transports, prevented the transportation of our army by water, either into Kentucky or Tennessee. The reader may think it strange that the Confederates, with nothing like the Federal resources, should
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
[Signed] Gideon Welles. Flag-officer A. H. Foote, U. S. N., Commanding Gun-boat Flotilla, &c., Cairo, Ill. Official thanks to the Army and Navy. The State of Ohio deemed this battle sufficiently important to merit a vote of thanks, as appears from the following: Relative to a vote of thanks to General Grant, Flag Officer Foote and others, for their courage and gallantry exhibited in the bombardment of Fort Henry. Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Ohio, That the thanks of the people of Ohio be, and through their representatives are, hereby tendered to General Grant and Flag-officer Foote, and the brave men under their commanOhio be, and through their representatives are, hereby tendered to General Grant and Flag-officer Foote, and the brave men under their command, for the courage, gallantry and enterprise exhibited in the bombardment and capture of Fort Henry, a victory no less brilliant in itself than glorious in its results, giving our Army a foothold in Tennessee, and opening the way for early advance to the capital of the State. Resolved, That the Governor transmit copies of these
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