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Browsing named entities in a specific section of William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. Search the whole document.

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April 3rd (search for this): chapter 8
ttox — the Twenty-fourth Corps lost 149 killed, and 565 wounded; total, 714. When General Ord moved the Army of the James to Petersburg, March 27, 1865, he left Devens' (3d) Division of the Twenty-fourth, and one division of the Twenty-fifth, in front of Richmond, on the north bank of the James. Upon the fall of Petersburg these troops, under General Weitzel, the commander of the Twenty-fifth Corps, marched on Richmond, and encountering little or no opposition entered that city on the 3d of April. Foster's and Turner's Divisions returned to Richmond after the victory at Appomattox, and the corps remained in Virginia until August 1, 1860, when the existence of the organization ceased officially, many of the regiments having already returned to their homes. Although this corps does not display any long list of battles, it should be remembered that its regiments were veterans of many hard-fought fields before they were assigned to it. They had withstood the shock of many battles, a
April 6th (search for this): chapter 8
ing Forts Gregg and Whitworth, which they carried by a determined and brilliant attack; but not without a serious loss, and a final struggle in which bayonet; were used. General Gibbon describes this assault as one of the most desperate in the war. The fall of Petersburg immediately followed as the result of the victorious assaults of the Twenty-fourth, Sixth, and Ninth Corps, after which the Twenty-fourth joined in the pursuit of Lee's Army. During this pursuit it had a sharp fight, April 6th, at Rice's Station, or High Bridge. On April 9th, the day of Lee's surrender, the corps was sharply engaged in the forenoon, the Twenty-fourth Corps having the honor of making the last infantry fight of that campaign, and of the war. Gibbon arrived at Appomattox Court House about ten o'clock, and intercepted Lee's troops who were driving the cavalry back in their attempt to escape. General Ord, commanding at that time the Twenty-fourth, Fifth, and Twenty-fifth (colored) Corps, states tha
April 9th (search for this): chapter 8
, after which the Twenty-fourth joined in the pursuit of Lee's Army. During this pursuit it had a sharp fight, April 6th, at Rice's Station, or High Bridge. On April 9th, the day of Lee's surrender, the corps was sharply engaged in the forenoon, the Twenty-fourth Corps having the honor of making the last infantry fight of that cafantry-volley of the war had been fired. This fight, on the day of Lee's surrender, was known by the troops as Clover Hill. During this campaign, March 29th to April 9th,--from Hatcher's Run to Appomattox — the Twenty-fourth Corps lost 149 killed, and 565 wounded; total, 714. When General Ord moved the Army of the James to Petas present in the fighting at the fall of Petersburg, after which it joined in the pursuit of Lee's Armny, and participated in the closing battle at Clover Hill, April 9th, the day of Lee's surrender. In the meantime, Kautz‘ Division accompanied General Weitzel to Richmond, the colored troops of the Twenty-fifth Corps being the
April 18th (search for this): chapter 8
leans. The troops were assigned to duty at various places in the Department of the Gulf,--in Texas and Louisiana. General Osterhaus was succeeded in command of his division by General C. C. Washburn. The Third and Fourth Divisions fought at Grand Coteau, La., November 3, 1863. The winter of 1863-4 was spent in the vicinity of New Orleans and the Lower Mississippi, a part of the corps being stationed in Texas. Corps headquarters were in Texas, but were moved to Alexandria, La., on the 18th of April, as the Third and Fourth Divisions had accompanied Banks on his Red River Expedition of April, 1864. General McClernand was again in command of the corps; the Third Division was commanded by General Cameron, and the Fourth, by General Landram. The First and Second Divisions remained in Texas during the Red River Expedition, excepting Lawler's (2d) Brigade, of the First Division, which joined Banks' Army about the 20th of April. The Third and Fourth Divisions of the Thirteenth Corps wer
April 20th (search for this): chapter 8
ers were in Texas, but were moved to Alexandria, La., on the 18th of April, as the Third and Fourth Divisions had accompanied Banks on his Red River Expedition of April, 1864. General McClernand was again in command of the corps; the Third Division was commanded by General Cameron, and the Fourth, by General Landram. The First and Second Divisions remained in Texas during the Red River Expedition, excepting Lawler's (2d) Brigade, of the First Division, which joined Banks' Army about the 20th of April. The Third and Fourth Divisions of the Thirteenth Corps were actively engaged at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1864, in which they sustained considerable loss. They were also engaged at Cane River, and at Cloutiersville, La. The corps organization was discontinued, June 11, 1864, and the troops transferred to other commands. It was reorganized, Feb. 18, 165, and Major-General Gordon Granger, of Chickamauga fame, was placed in command; the divisions were commanded
April 26th (search for this): chapter 8
nfantry and artillery. It encountered some fighting in forcing disputed crossings at some of the larger rivers, and captured Columbia, S. C., General C. R. Woods' Division occupying the city at the time it was burned. The corps was also in line at the battle of Bentonville, N. C., March 19, 1865; but General Slocum had won a substantial victory with his wing of the Army, and but little fighting, comparatively, devolved upon the Army of the Tennessee. Johnston's Army having surrendered April 26th, time corps continued its northward march, and, arriving at Washington May 20th, participated in the Grand Review of May 24, 1865. It proceeded, June 2d, to Louisville, Ky., and in the latter part of that month the Second Division was ordered to Little Rock, Ark., where it served with the Army of Occupation. The organization was discontinued August 1, 1865. Sixteenth Corps. Hernando Coldwater Town Creek Siege of Vicksburg Jackson Collierville Meridian March Snake Cre
April 30th (search for this): chapter 8
s immediately ordered to the Peninsula, Hamilton's Division embarking on the 17th, and leading the advance of the Army of the Potomac on that memorable campaign. During the siege of Yorktown the corps was at its maximum, the morning reports of April 30th showing an aggregate of 39,710, with 64 pieces of light artillery, and 34,633 reported as present for duty. But this aggregate was maintained but for a short time, as Porter's Division was taken away soon after to form part of the newly organized Fifth Corps. Hamilton was relieved on April 30th, and General Philip Kearny took his place, Hamilton going to the Army of the Mississippi, where he was assigned to a division command. Upon the evacuation of Yorktown, the Third Corps led the pursuit of the retreating enemy, attacking him, May 5th, at Williamsburg, with Hooker's and Kearny's Divisions. This battle was fought almost entirely by the Third Corps; of the 2,239 casualties on that field, 2,002 occurred within its ranks; and thr
24, 1865. The Second Division having arrived at Savannah, General Grover was assigned to the command of the district, and General H. W. Birge to the command of the division. In March, 1865, Birge's Division, containing three brigades, eighteen regiments, was ordered to North Carolina, where it was attached temporarily to the Tenth Corps and was designated as the First Division of that corps. The Fourth Brigade of Birge's Division was left at Savannah, the whole division returning there in May. The Nineteenth corps remained at Savannah and vicinity until August, 1865; some of the regiments remained until 1866. The corps organization, however, was officially discontinued March 26, 1865. The portion of the corps left behind at New Orleans remained in the Department of the Gulf, and, in the spring of 1865, participated with the Thirteenth and Sixteenth corps in General Canby's operations against Fort Blakely, Spanish Fort, and Mobile. Twentieth Corps. (McCook's.) Stone's
e, but was not present at the battle, after which it went into winter-quarters at Stafford, Va. General Sigel having asked to be relieved, General O. O. Howard was appointed in his place. General Howard commanded the corps at Chancellorsville, May 1--3, 1863, at which time it numbered 12, 169 effectives, and was composed of the divisions of Generals Devens, Von Steinwehr, and Schurz. It contained 27 regiments of infantry, of which 13 were German regiments. The men of the Eleventh Corps werit was left to guard the Nashville & Decatur R. R., while Sherman with the Fifteenth corps moved on to Chattanooga. Two divisions, the Second and Fourth, commanded respectively by Generals Sweeny and Veatch, participated in the Atlanta campaign, May 1 to September 4, 1864. These two divisions, or the Sixteenth Corps as it was designated, were under the command of Major-General Grenville M. Dodge, and formed one of the three corps constituting the Army of the Tennessee. During the Atlanta cam
th, and General Philip Kearny took his place, Hamilton going to the Army of the Mississippi, where he was assigned to a division command. Upon the evacuation of Yorktown, the Third Corps led the pursuit of the retreating enemy, attacking him, May 5th, at Williamsburg, with Hooker's and Kearny's Divisions. This battle was fought almost entirely by the Third Corps; of the 2,239 casualties on that field, 2,002 occurred within its ranks; and three-fourths of them in Hooker's Division, the bruntat Spotsylvania. General Cutler, of the Iron Brigade, succeeded to Wadsworth's command, while Robinson's Division was broken up, and its regiments were distributed to the other three divisions. The losses of the Fifth Corps, at the Wilderness, May 5th and 6th, were 487 killed, 2,817 wounded, and 1,828 missing; total, 5,132. At Spotsylvania, May 8th-13th, it lost 657 killed, 3,448 wounded, and 375 missing; total, 4,480. During the hard fighting and bloody assaults at Cold Harbor, the Fifth
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