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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Nathan Cochran (search for this): chapter 127
officers. Enlisted men. Commissioned officers. Enlisted men. First brigade 2 38 10 145 25 811 37 994 Second brigade 5 34     18 407 33 441 Third brigade 1 109 3 131 8 160 12 400 Total 8 181 13 276 51 1,378 72 1,835 In conclusion, I beg to bear testimony to the courage, fidelity, and efficiency of my staff during the battle of the tenth. As has always been the case, they performed their whole duty. My orderlies, Francis De Freitas, of the Hundred and Fourteenth, and Nathan Cochran, of the Seventy-second, deserve especial mention for their conspicuous gallantry and intelligent performance of every trust. I have the honor to forward herewith official reports of commanding officers of brigades, to which you are respectfully referred for a more particular notice of those officers worthy of mention. I have the honor to be, Captain, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, W. L. Mcmillen, Colonel Ninety-fifth Ohio Infantry, Commanding Division. Captain W.
Robert Cowden (search for this): chapter 127
ommanding. Third brigade: Colonel Edward Bouton, Fifty-ninth United States infantry (colored), commanding; Fifty-fifth United States infantry, (colored), Major E. M. Lowe, commanding; Fifty-ninth United States infantry, (colored,) Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Cowden, commanding; Battery F, Second United States artillery (colored), Captain C. A. Lamburgh commanding. During the organization of the infantry division the large supply and ammunition train was brought up by the cavalry and turned oth Minnesota again took a conspicuous part, and the colored regiments fought with a gallantry which commended them to the favor of their comrades in arms. I desire to bear testimony to their bravery and endurance, as well as the gallantry of Colonel Cowden and Major Lowe, commanding regiments. This checked the pursuit and ended the fighting for that evening. The whole column was then put in motion for Ripley. Upon reaching the crossing of the Hatchie the wagon train was found stuck and the r
ing brigades and batteries: First brigade, Colonel McMillen, Ninety-fifth Ohio volunteer infantry; Second brigade, Colonel Wilken, Ninth Minnesota volunteer infantry; Third brigade, Colonel Woods, Twelfth Iowa volunteer infantry; Fourth brigade, Colonel Ward, Fourteenth Wisconsin volunteer infantry. This brigade was a detachment from the Seventeenth Army Corps, temporarily assigned to my command. Second Iowa battery, Lieutenant Reid commanding; First Illinois, company E (one section), Lieutenant Cram; and a battery, four Rodmans, belonging to company M, First Missouri, but manned by Captain Miller's company, Sixth Indiana battery. We arrived at Pontotoc on the twelfth instant, and on the morning of the thirteenth moved toward Tupelo. The colonel commanding brigade of colored troops, which was in rear of my division about nine miles of Tupelo, sent word to me that he was threatened by a large force of the enemy. I directed Colonel Ward, whose brigade had been marching on the r
es on one side. We soon arrived at the slope where part of the train had been abandoned and a portion burned. Shortly after passing the creek I discovered the skirmishers of the Third brigade in the open fields on our left. Perceiving an officer with them, I directed him to have the men form on the right of the Ninth Minnesota, in a thicket in front of which were large open fields over which the enemy must pass. He informed me that he was not in command, but pointed out to me Lieutenant-Colonel Crawdon, who was severely wounded. The Ninth Minnesota formed, the One Hundred and Fourteenth Illinois being on the right, as I am informed by Lieutenant-Colonel King. The enemy soon appeared in large numbers, but not in line, when a heavy fire was opened upon them from the thicket, which was kept up for about twenty minutes, and large numbers fell. They retired in confusion. This was between sundown and dark, and the enemy did not again appear in force. About eight o'clock in the eve
ourteenth Illinois respectively on the right of the road as you go toward Ripley, and sent out skirmishers, who soon found the enemy in front. Lieutenant-Colonel King having informed me that his ammunition was almost exhausted, I directed Lieutenant Cruse, Ninth Minnesota volunteers, A. A. A. G., to proceed to the rear to procure a supply, but finding no means of transportation, he brought back one box on his horse. The fighting at this time was severe, continuing for over half an hour, and s, for information in regard to the roads over which we passed in the retreat. I cannot speak too highly of the conduct of each member of my staff. The duties imposed upon them were onerous in the extreme, owing to their limited number. Lieutenant Cruse, Adjutant of the Ninth Minnesota, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, although under fire for the first time, conducted himself with all the coolness of a veteran. Lieutenant Hosmer, of the One Hundred and Thirteenth Illinois, Inspector of t
er, along the roads and through woods in our immediate front, and to maintain it until the infantry were well under way, and that I would form another line, a short distance in the rear, to keep the enemy from the cross-roads until they could get their pieces away. This new line was a prolongation of that occupied by the Seventy-second Ohio infantry, and was formed by that regiment, the Ninety-fifth Ohio infantry, and about two hundred dismounted men of the Tenth Missouri cavalry, under Captain Currry, who reported to me for orders on the field, and rendered valuable and gallant service in assisting to hold the enemy in check until the retreating column had passed. The main portion of the First and Second brigades, which had been hotly engaged with the enemy for nearly three hours, now retired under cover of this new line, and continued to march by the flank to the rear. Just after crossing a small stream, about a quarter of a mile in the rear of the cross-roads, I met the Fifty-f
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 127
ollow the Salisbury road, and toward evening was joined by Captain Foster, Fifty-ninth regiment A. D., with about six hundred of his own and the Fifty-fifth regiment A. D., he having crossed over from the Salem road, which he considered unsafe. That night we bivouacked near Brooks', about five miles from Salisbury. The next morning at daylight we resumed the march, and after proceeding about three miles turned to the left, taking a settlement road leading to Davis' mills. Upon arriving at Davis', I found the bridge partially destroyed, and upon halting to repair it we were fired upon by a considerable number of the enemy, who were soon driven back, after wounding two of our men on the hill, and one of the flankers of the One Hundred and Fourteenth Illinois, and hitting the horse of Lieutenant-Colonel King, while passing the swamps beyond the bridge. Soon after, we were again attacked in front, but owing to the vigilance of the half-breed scouts of company H, Ninth Minnesota, and t
Doc. 49. expedition to Tupelo, Mississippi General Mower's report. headquarters First division, Sixteenth Army corps, Memphis, Tennessee, July 27, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by my division on the late expedition to Tupelo, Mississippi: I left La Grange on the morning of the fifth instant with my command, which was composed of the following brigades and batteries: First brigade, Colonel McMillen, Ninety-fifth Ohio volunteer infantry; Second brigade, Colonel Wilken, Ninth Minnesota volunteer infantry; Third brigade, Colonel Woods, Twelfth Iowa volunteer infantry; Fourth brigade, Colonel Ward, Fourteenth Wisconsin volunteer infantry. This brigade was a detachment from the Seventeenth Army Corps, temporarily assigned to my command. Second Iowa battery, Lieutenant Reid commanding; First Illinois, company E (one section), Lieutenant Cram; and a battery, four Rodmans, belonging to company M, First Missouri, but manned by
Charles G. Eaton (search for this): chapter 127
Minnesota infantry, commanding; Seventy-second Ohio infantry, veteran volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Charles G. Eaton, commanding; Ninety-fifth Ohio infantry volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Jefferson kirmishers, were seen crossing the open field in our rear, and toward the Ripley road. Lieutenant-Colonel Eaton, commanding the Seventy-second Ohio, in connection with the dismounted cavalry, opened e. Having proceeded about half a mile, Brigadier-General Grierson rode up and directed Lieutenant-Colonel Eaton to form his regiment behind the fences on the right of the road, in rear of open fieldsred and Fourteenth Illinois; Lieutenant-Colonel Brombeck, commanding Ninety-fifth Ohio; Lieutenant-Colonel Eaton, commanding Seventy-second Ohio; Lieutenant-Colonel Marsh, commanding Ninth Minnesota; ndled their respective comands. I am much indebted to Lieutenant-Colonels King, Brombeck, and Eaton, and Lieutenant-Colonel Floyd, of the One Hundred and Twentieth Illinois, and other officers, fo
olonel Hoge's regiment came up they were deployed on the right of the Baldwin road, extending the line in a semi-circular form in the direction of the Guntown road, relieving the cavalry as they took position. As soon as the regiments took their position in line, skirmishers were thrown forward, and the men told that the enemy was in their immediate presence in force, and that they must be prepared to meet a heavy attack soon. The skirmish line was established along the whole front by Captain Fernald, Seventy-second Ohio infantry, acting aid-de-camp, under a constant fire from the enemy. Chapman was ordered in battery in the open ground about Brice's house, and directed to open upon the enemy over the heads of our men. Soon after Hoge's brigade was placed in position, the First brigade, Colonel Wilken, came up, the Ninety-fifth Ohio infantry in advance. This regiment was immediately placed in line on the left of the Baldwin road, with instructions to assist the regiments of Hog
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