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April 21st (search for this): chapter 30
hat I could not deny her. Words can hardly say how I suffered in giving up the trip and disappointing so many people. ... As I lay taking my afternoon rest, my heart said to God, You cannot help me in this; but He did help me, for I was able soon after this to interest myself in things at hand. I heard Mabilleau's lecture on French art in its recent departure. It was brilliant and forcibly stated, but disappointing. He quoted with admiration Baudelaire's hideous poem, Un Carogne. .. . April 21. In the afternoon attended anniversary of the Blind Kindergarten, where I made, as usual, a brief address, beginning with God said, Let there be light, a sentence which makes itself felt throughout the human domain, where great-hearted men are stirred by it to combat the spirits of darkness. Spoke also of the culture of the blind as vindicating the dignity of the human mind, which can become a value and a power despite the loss of outward sense. Alluded to dear Chev's sense of this and hi
April 30th (search for this): chapter 30
of the Papa I said at the end: zhtw= to\ *(ellh/nikon e)/thnos. My speech and Greek sentence were much applauded. A young Greek lady presented me with a fine bouquet of white carnations with blue and white ribbons, the colors of Greece. Sanborn read from dear Chev's letters of 1825. Michael spoke at great length, with great vehemence and gesticulation. I understood many words, but could only guess at the general drift. I imagine that it was very eloquent, as he was much applauded. April 30. Lorin Deland called to talk about the verses which I am to write and read at his theatre. The thought of Cassandra seized me. She, coming to the house of the Atridue, had a vision of its horrors; I, coming to this good theatre, have a vision of the good things which have been enjoyed there and which shall still be enjoyed. Wrote down some five or six lines, lest I forget. Mr. and Mrs. Deland were among her best friends of the second generation. Indeed, there was such a sympathy and c
lluded to dear Chev's sense of this and his resolve that the blind, from being simply a burden, should become of value to the community. The care of them draws forth tender sympathy in those whose office it is to cherish and instruct them. Spoke of the nursery as one of the dearest of human institutions. Commended the little blind nursery to the affectionate regard of seeing people. The children did exceedingly well, especially the orchestra. The little blind 'cellist was remarkable. May 2. Dreamed last night that I was dead and kept saying, I found it out immediately, to those around me..... May 28. My prayer for the new year of my life beginning to-day is, that in some work that I shall undertake I may help to make clear the goodness of God to some who need to know more of it than they do.... June 22. Mabel Loomis Todd wrote asking me for a word to enclose in the corner-stone of the new observatory building at Amherst [Massachusetts]. I have just sent her the followin
e, had a vision of its horrors; I, coming to this good theatre, have a vision of the good things which have been enjoyed there and which shall still be enjoyed. Wrote down some five or six lines, lest I forget. Mr. and Mrs. Deland were among her best friends of the second generation. Indeed, there was such a sympathy and comprehension between her and Margaret that the latter playfully declared herself a daughter abandoned in infancy, and was wont to sign herself, Your doorstep Brat ! May 5. .. . Without religion you will never know the real beauty and glory of life; you will perceive the discords, but miss the harmony; will see the defects, but miss the good in all things. In these years an added burden was laid upon her, in the general and affectionate desire for her presence on all manner of occasions. The firemen must have her at their ball, the Shoe and Leather Trade at their banquet, the Paint and Oils Association at their dinner. Their festivities would not be comp
ears an added burden was laid upon her, in the general and affectionate desire for her presence on all manner of occasions. The firemen must have her at their ball, the Shoe and Leather Trade at their banquet, the Paint and Oils Association at their dinner. Their festivities would not be complete without her; she loved them, went to their parties, had the right word to say, and came home happy, her arms full of flowers. It was all beautiful and heart-warming, but it had to be paid for. May 10 brought the punishment for this season. Annual Woman Suffrage supper. I was to have spoken at this occasion and to have recited the poem which I wrote for Castle Square Theatre, but it was otherwise ordained. I rose as usual, my head a little misty. A mighty blow of vertigo seized me.... The elder Wesselhoeft pronounced it a brain fag, not likely to have serious results, but emphatically a warning not to abuse further my nervous strength. Got up in afternoon and finished Villa Claudia
warning not to abuse further my nervous strength. Got up in afternoon and finished Villa Claudia ; was bitterly sad at disappointing the suffragists and Deland. Dr. Wesselhoeft was asked on this occasion why, at her age, so severe an attack as this had not resulted in paralysis. Because, he replied, she brought to receive it the strength of forty years of age! Sure enough, the next day she felt as if her nervous balance was very well restored, and in a week she was at work again. May 18.... In the evening had word of a Decoration Day poem needed. At once tried some lines. May 19. Doubted much of my poem, but wrote it, spending most of the working hours over it; wrote and rewrote, corrected again and again. Julia Richards mailed it at about 4 P. M.... Just as I went to bed I remembered that in the third verse of my poem I had used the words tasks and erect as if they rhymed. This troubled me a good deal. My prayer was, God help the fool. May 20. My trouble of mind
; was bitterly sad at disappointing the suffragists and Deland. Dr. Wesselhoeft was asked on this occasion why, at her age, so severe an attack as this had not resulted in paralysis. Because, he replied, she brought to receive it the strength of forty years of age! Sure enough, the next day she felt as if her nervous balance was very well restored, and in a week she was at work again. May 18.... In the evening had word of a Decoration Day poem needed. At once tried some lines. May 19. Doubted much of my poem, but wrote it, spending most of the working hours over it; wrote and rewrote, corrected again and again. Julia Richards mailed it at about 4 P. M.... Just as I went to bed I remembered that in the third verse of my poem I had used the words tasks and erect as if they rhymed. This troubled me a good deal. My prayer was, God help the fool. May 20. My trouble of mind about the deficient verse woke me at 6.30 A. M. I tossed about and wondered how I could lie still
s at work again. May 18.... In the evening had word of a Decoration Day poem needed. At once tried some lines. May 19. Doubted much of my poem, but wrote it, spending most of the working hours over it; wrote and rewrote, corrected again and again. Julia Richards mailed it at about 4 P. M.... Just as I went to bed I remembered that in the third verse of my poem I had used the words tasks and erect as if they rhymed. This troubled me a good deal. My prayer was, God help the fool. May 20. My trouble of mind about the deficient verse woke me at 6.30 A. M. I tossed about and wondered how I could lie still until 7.30, my usual time for rising. The time passed somehow. I could not think of any correction to make in my verse. Hoped that I should find that I had not written it as I feared. When I came to look at it, there it was. Instantly a line with a proper rhyme presented itself to my mind. To add to my trouble I had lost the address to which I had sent the poem. My gran
've had a lot of birthdays and I'm growing very old, that's why they make so much of me, if once the truth were told. And I love the shade in summer, and in winter love the sun, and I'm just learning how to live, my wisdom's just begun. Don't trouble more to celebrate this natal day of mine, but keep the grasp of fellowship which warms us more than wine. Let us thank the lavish hand that gives world beauty to our eyes, and bless the days that saw us young, and years that make us wise. May 27. my eighty-sixth birthday. I slept rather late, yesterday having been eminently a bootandsaddle day.... the Greeks, mostly working-people, sent me a superb leash of roses with a satin ribbon bearing a Greek inscription. My visitors were numerous, many of them the best friends that time has left me. T. W. H. Was very dear. My dear ones of the household bestirred themselves to send flowers, according to my wishes, to the children's Hospital and to Charles Street jail. May 28.... a great
. The little blind 'cellist was remarkable. May 2. Dreamed last night that I was dead and kept saying, I found it out immediately, to those around me..... May 28. My prayer for the new year of my life beginning to-day is, that in some work that I shall undertake I may help to make clear the goodness of God to some who need This was Mr. S. H. Butcher, the well-known Greek scholar. She enjoyed his visit greatly, and they talked high and disposedly of things classical and modern. May 28. My meeting of Women Ministers. They gathered very slowly and I feared that it would prove a failure, but soon we had a good number. Mary Graves helped me very very dear. My dear ones of the household bestirred themselves to send flowers, according to my wishes, to the children's Hospital and to Charles Street jail. May 28.... a great box of my birthday flowers ornamented the pulpit of the church. They were to be distributed afterwards to the Sunday-School children, some to the Pr
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