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d still do some good work. Yes! my strong friend, my heart said, I will abide in thee, and a bit of the old Easter anthem came back to me, He sitteth at the right hand of God, in the glory of the Father. No, it is a verse of the Te Deum. In October a lecture in South Berwick gave her the opportunity, always greatly enjoyed, of a visit to Sarah Orne Jewett and her sister Mary. November 1. South Berwick. A delightful drive. Mary Jewett, Annie Fields, and I to visit Mrs. Tyson in the Hame a spur, and this morning I have writ the President a long letter, to the effect desired. God grant that it may have some result! July 17. I despaired of being able to write a poem as requested for the Kansas semi-centennial celebration in October, but one line came to me: Sing us a song of the grand old time and the rest followed .. . This poem is printed in At Sunset. July 21. Writ ... to Mrs. Martha J. Hosmer, of Rock Point, Oregon, who wrote me a kindly meant letter, exhorting
October 2nd (search for this): chapter 30
elp me to renew my youth.... September 25. I could not go to church to-day, fearing to increase my cold, and not wishing to leave my dear family, so rarely united now. Have been reading Abbe Loisy's Autour d'un petit Livre, which is an apologetic vindication of his work LaEvangile et laEglise, which has been put upon the Index [Expurgatorius]. I feel sensibly all differences between his apologetic wobbly vindication of the Church of Rome, and the sound and firm faith of Thomas Hill. October 2. Mr. Fitzhugh Whitehouse, having left here a copy of my From Sunset Ridge for me to furnish with a sentiment, I indited the following:--From Sunset Ridge we view the evening sky, Blood red and gold, defeat and victory; If in the contest we have failed or won, 'T was ours to live, to strive and so pass on. October 5.... To Peace Congress, where Albert Smiley was presiding. A wonderful feature came in the person of a Hindu religionist, who came to plead the cause of the Thibetan Llama.
October 5th (search for this): chapter 30
t Ridge for me to furnish with a sentiment, I indited the following:--From Sunset Ridge we view the evening sky, Blood red and gold, defeat and victory; If in the contest we have failed or won, 'T was ours to live, to strive and so pass on. October 5.... To Peace Congress, where Albert Smiley was presiding. A wonderful feature came in the person of a Hindu religionist, who came to plead the cause of the Thibetan Llama. He said that the Thibetans are not fighting people: are devoted to relould not make distinct letters. Then I forced myself to pen some rough draft and now the pen goes better, but not yet quite right. I had the same experience last winter once. I suppose that I have overtired my brain; it is a warning. .. . October 5.... I had a moment of visioning, in which I seemed to see Christ on the cross refusing to drink the vinegar and gall, and myself to reach up a golden cup containing the love pledge of humanity. Coming home I scrawled the verses before lying do
October 9th (search for this): chapter 30
ar in mind that it is sacredly pledged to maintain justice. The brightest intellects, the most profound study, should be devoted to the promotion of this end. The Greek bishop met me in the ante-room and said, We always pray for you. . . . October 9. I have felt more strongly than ever of late that God is the only comforter ... These great serious things were always present to work for in days in which I exerted myself to amuse others and myself too. It is quite true that I have never givereach up a golden cup containing the love pledge of humanity. Coming home I scrawled the verses before lying down to rest. These verses are printed in At Sunset, under the title of Humanity, and at the head of chapter XI of this volume. October 9. After a week of painful anxiety I learn to-day that my screed for the Cosmopolitan is accepted. I felt so persuaded to the contrary that I delayed to open the envelope until I had read all my other letters ... October 25. Meeting of Boston
October 25th (search for this): chapter 30
and gall, and myself to reach up a golden cup containing the love pledge of humanity. Coming home I scrawled the verses before lying down to rest. These verses are printed in At Sunset, under the title of Humanity, and at the head of chapter XI of this volume. October 9. After a week of painful anxiety I learn to-day that my screed for the Cosmopolitan is accepted. I felt so persuaded to the contrary that I delayed to open the envelope until I had read all my other letters ... October 25. Meeting of Boston Authors' Club ... Worked all the morning at sorting my letters and papers. ... Laura, Maud, and I drove out to Cambridge. I had worked hard all the morning, but had managed to put together a scrap of rhyme in welcome of Mark Twain. A candle was lit for me to read by, and afterwards M. T. jumped upon a chair and made fun, some good, some middling, for some three quarters of an hour. The effect of my one candle lighting up his curly hair was good and my rhyme was well
Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 In music hall Looking down upon the white heads of my contemporaries Beneath what mound of snow Are hid my springtime roses? How shall Remembrance know Where buried Hope reposes? In what forgetful heart As in a canton darkling, Slumbers the blissful art That set my heaven sparkling? What sense shall never know, Soul shall remember; Roses beneath the snow, June in November. J. W. H. The year 1903 began with the celebration at Faneuil Hall of the fortieth anniversary of Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. She was one of the speakers. I felt much the spirit of the occasion, and spoke, I thought, better than usual, going back to the heroic times before and during the war, and to the first celebration forty years ago, at which I was present. Work of all kinds poured in, the usual steady stream. January 6. Wrote a new circular for Countess. Who the Countess was, or what the circular was about, is not know
November 1st (search for this): chapter 30
y did Christ's words come to me, Abide in me, etc. I felt that if I would abide in Him, old as I am, I could still do some good work. Yes! my strong friend, my heart said, I will abide in thee, and a bit of the old Easter anthem came back to me, He sitteth at the right hand of God, in the glory of the Father. No, it is a verse of the Te Deum. In October a lecture in South Berwick gave her the opportunity, always greatly enjoyed, of a visit to Sarah Orne Jewett and her sister Mary. November 1. South Berwick. A delightful drive. Mary Jewett, Annie Fields, and I to visit Mrs. Tyson in the Hamilton House described by Sarah in her Tory Lover. . . . Most interesting. Mrs. Tyson very cordial and delightful..... She came over later to dinner and we had such a pleasant time! In afternoon copied most of my screed for the Boston Globe. It surely was not on this occasion that she described dinner as a thing of courses and remorses! November 2. Took reluctant leave of the Jewett
November 2nd (search for this): chapter 30
Orne Jewett and her sister Mary. November 1. South Berwick. A delightful drive. Mary Jewett, Annie Fields, and I to visit Mrs. Tyson in the Hamilton House described by Sarah in her Tory Lover. . . . Most interesting. Mrs. Tyson very cordial and delightful..... She came over later to dinner and we had such a pleasant time! In afternoon copied most of my screed for the Boston Globe. It surely was not on this occasion that she described dinner as a thing of courses and remorses! November 2. Took reluctant leave of the Jewett house and the trio, Sarah, Mary, and Annie Fields. We had a wonderful dish of pigeons for lunch .... It was delightful to see our mother and Miss Jewett together. They were the best of playmates, having a lovely intimacy of understanding. Their talk rippled with light and laughter. Such stories as they told! such songs as they sang! who that heard will ever forget our mother's story of Edward Everett in his youth? He was to take three young lad
November 8th (search for this): chapter 30
ave always agreed with me perfectly! Indeed, till the very latest years, her digestion had never failed her. It was in the eighties that she said to one of us, I have a singular sensation that I have never felt before. Do you think it might possibly be indigestion? She described it, and it was indigestion. We are reminded of a contemporary of hers who, being gently rebuked for giving rich food to a delicate grandchild, replied with lofty scorn, Stuff and nonsense Teach his stomach! November 8.... In late afternoon some visioning, i.e., lying down to rest and asking and answering questions in my mind:-- Question: Can anything exceed the delight of the first mutual understanding of two lovers? Answer: This has its sacredness and its place, but even better is the large affection which embraces things human and divine, God and man. Question: Are Saviour and Saints alive now? Answer: If you believe that God is just, they must be. They gave all for His truth: He owes th
November 12th (search for this): chapter 30
self to amuse others and myself too. It is quite true that I have never given up serious thought and study, but I have not made the serious use of my powers which I ought to have made. The Peace Congress has left upon my mind a strong impression of what the lovers of humanity could accomplish if they were all and always in earnest. I seem to hope for a fresh consecration, for opportunities truly to serve, and for the continuance of that gift of the word which is sometimes granted me. November 12. I to attend meeting of Council of Jewish Women; say something regarding education. .... I was warmly received and welcomed, and recited my Battle Hymn by special request. This last gave me an unexpected thrill of satisfaction. The president said: Dear Mrs. Howe, there is nothing in it to wound us. I had feared that the last verse might trouble them, but it did not. November 19. Was busy trying to arrange bills and papers so as to go to Gardiner to-morrow with my Richards son-in
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