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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

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October 22nd (search for this): chapter 12
lley district. Under this order, the troops were for the first time formed into divisions. Its last clause indicated an important policy of the government in the organization of the Confederate armies--that is, the brigading of the regiments by States. This policy no doubt added greatly to esprit de corps of the brigades. It was distinctive of the organization of the Confederate army, and was not adopted in the Federal. In a subsequent order (No. 18), 15th November, 1861, that of the 22d October was modified, so as to extend this principle to divisions as well as brigades, but the extension of the principle was not carried out, except in the case of Pickett's division, which afterwards consisted of four Virginia brigades. Records War of Rebellion, Vol. 5, p. 960. When, after the able defence of the Peninsula by General Johnston, and the brilliant and extraordinary campaign of Jackson in the Valley, the armies composing the department of Northern Virginia had converged, in
October 31st (search for this): chapter 12
statement universally would do great injustice to the numerous efeves of the Virginia Military Institute—the socalled West Point of the South—some of whom were to be found among the officers of every Virginia regiment, and not a few from other States, who estimated these matters as highly as any Prussian martinet, and who spent the late fall and winter of 1861 in industriously and successfully drilling officers and men in every nicety of the art-military.—[Letter in Charleston Sunday News, October 31, signed K.] No doubt it would have been unjust and untrue to have said that there were no regiments in the Confederate service trained and drilled in these things; but I think still that the observation is generally true, as I have made it—that is, that there were few regiments which were so drilled. Besides the graduates of the Virginia Military Institute there were also the graduates of the South Carolina Military Academy, who did for some South Carolina regiments what those of th
December 31st (search for this): chapter 12
1861. The first organization of troops for actual service and for a definite period, was made under a resolution of the Convention of South Carolina, which passed the ordinance of secession. The General Assembly of the State, which was in session at the same time, had, on the 17th December, 1860, passed an act providing for an armed military force to be organized into a division of two or more brigades; but as it was deemed necessary to raise a smaller body of troops at once, on the 31st December, four days after the Charleston volunteer companies had taken possession of the forts in the harbor, the Convention passed a resolution authorizing the governor to cause to be enlisted in the service of the State, for the term of twelve months, one regiment of six hundred and forty privates, to be divided into eight companies. Under this resolution, Governor Pickens commissioned and empowered Colonel Maxcy Gregg, who afterwards fell as Brigadier-General at Fredericksburg, to organize
trength of the Confederate armies, and I had intended in this address to discuss the question, and have sought and obtained some considerable material for doing so, but failing to obtain some returns to perfect a table I have had in preparation, I have deferred to some other occasion its consideration. the total armed forces reach the enormous amount of nearly four millions drawn from a population of only thirty-two millions—figures before which the celebrated uprising of the French Nation in 1793, or the recent efforts of France and Germany in the war of 1870-1871 sink into insignificance. I have thought, my comrades, that instead of taking for the subject of our recollections on this occasion of our annual reunion, any of the great achievements in battle of the famous army in which it was our fortune to have served, and our well justified pride to have belonged, I would rather, quoting General Colley's estimate of the forces of the Southern army for my text, talk to you this eve
December 17th, 1860 AD (search for this): chapter 12
for actual service and for a definite period, was made under a resolution of the Convention of South Carolina, which passed the ordinance of secession. The General Assembly of the State, which was in session at the same time, had, on the 17th December, 1860, passed an act providing for an armed military force to be organized into a division of two or more brigades; but as it was deemed necessary to raise a smaller body of troops at once, on the 31st December, four days after the Charleston volas authorized to retain, with the colors, upon its reorganization after the expiration of its six months term, notwithstanding the fact that another regiment of the State—the first of those organized under the act of the Legislature of the 17th December, 1860—bore the same designation. This was unfortunate, but I think I can truthfully say that neither regiment found cause to be ashamed of the name borne by the other. We fell upon a modus vivendi, by calling our's Gregg's First, and were prou
December 27th, 1860 AD (search for this): chapter 12
w militia companies. The Army of Northern Virginia in Charleston harbor around Fort Sumter, and the army of the West at Pensacola before Fort Pickens. When South Carolina seceded, and Major Anderson made the first move of the war, on the 27th December, 1860, abandoning and burning Fort Moultrie, and taking possession of Fort Sumter, the State of South Carolina had but the volunteer companies of the city of Charleston available for seizing and occupying the other strategic points around Charlese formed the nucleus of the army so long commanded by General Bragg, who may be said to have organized them there. The volunteer companies of the Fourth brigade, South Carolina militia, that is the Charleston volunteer companies, on the 27th December, 1860, seized Castle Pinckney, Fort Moultrie, Morris Island, Fort Johnson and the arsenal in the city. They thus took the field without an hour's notice, and held these points until relieved by other troops raised by the State; and indeed were o
rder of things now existing did not in the least prevent us from being true to our convictions of 1861-‘65, and that we have by no means ceased to honor our Confederate leaders or our noble Confederatfederation of which it is a part. Let us not be afraid then, to-night, to rekindle the flames of 1861. Let us light them again if we can, and take into our common country the undying love for the lamated these matters as highly as any Prussian martinet, and who spent the late fall and winter of 1861 in industriously and successfully drilling officers and men in every nicety of the art-military.— suffered from panic, or was routed as the Federal army in both the battles on Manassas Plains in 1861 and ‘62, and at Chancellorsville. Our system of recruiting was certainly wiser than that of the her numbers in the field. Had we been able to arm the volunteers who offered their services in 1861 the result of the war might have been very different. Mr. Davis has been blamed for not having r<
March, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 12
more than double her numbers in the field. Had we been able to arm the volunteers who offered their services in 1861 the result of the war might have been very different. Mr. Davis has been blamed for not having raised at once an army of 500,000, which he could just as easily have mustered as 10,000. But an army without arms is little better than a mob, and we did not have the arms to put in the hands of the men who were willing to go forward. The act of the Confederate Congress of March, 1861, authorizing the President to ask for and accept any number of volunteers not exceeding 100,000, expressly provided that the volunteers should furnish their own clothes, and, if mounted, their own horses and equipments, and when mustered into the service should be armed by the States from which they came. It was not until August, 1861, that Congress authorized the Secretary of War to provide and furnish clothing for the forces of the Confederacy, nor was such clothing furnished until the
April, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 12
, the distinguished and accomplished British officer, General G. Pomeroy Colley, C. B., who soon after fell in that wretched little Boerer war in the Transvaal, after giving a brief sketch of the armies of the world, ancient and modern, of the rise and organization of each, and of all the great levees of history, closing with an account of the American army, and its strange military history, says: The total number of men called under arms by the Government of the United States between April, 1861, and April, 1865, amounted to 2,759,049, of whom 2,656,053 were actually embodied in the armies. If to these we add the 1,100,000 men embodied by the Southern States during the same time, This is, I am satisfied, an overestimate of the strength of the Confederate armies, and I had intended in this address to discuss the question, and have sought and obtained some considerable material for doing so, but failing to obtain some returns to perfect a table I have had in preparation, I have
April 13th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 12
aid to have organized them there. The volunteer companies of the Fourth brigade, South Carolina militia, that is the Charleston volunteer companies, on the 27th December, 1860, seized Castle Pinckney, Fort Moultrie, Morris Island, Fort Johnson and the arsenal in the city. They thus took the field without an hour's notice, and held these points until relieved by other troops raised by the State; and indeed were on duty with but little intermission until the fall of Fort Sumter on the 13th April, 1861. The first organization of troops for actual service and for a definite period, was made under a resolution of the Convention of South Carolina, which passed the ordinance of secession. The General Assembly of the State, which was in session at the same time, had, on the 17th December, 1860, passed an act providing for an armed military force to be organized into a division of two or more brigades; but as it was deemed necessary to raise a smaller body of troops at once, on the 31st
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